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  • 80-year-old Sumi Abe is rescued from her destroyed house nine days after the 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami on March 20, 2011 in Ishinomaki, Miyagi, Japan.

    In the wake of Japan’s cascading disasters, signs of economic loss can be found in many corners of the globe, from Sendai, on the battered Japanese coast, to Paris to Marion, Ark., reports the New York Times.

  • Fukushima Daiichi Plant_200.jpg

    Plans to develop new nuclear reactors may have to be put on hold until world leaders assess the causes of Japan's nuclear disaster and how to prevent a repeat of the accident, Luis Echavarri, director of the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency told CNBC.

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    The Group of Seven nations have agreed to a secret protocol to guide their coordinated intervention and won’t reveal it in order to keep currency markets guessing, according to people familiar with the matter.

  • As the market begins the process of second guessing the G7’s coordinated action to keep the yen lower, High Frequency Economics is warning investors the damage caused by the disaster in Japan is being both understated by the government and underappreciated outside of people in the immediate vicinity.

  • A factory building has collapsed in Sukagawa city, Fukushima prefecture, in northern Japan. A massive 8.9-magnitude earthquake shook Japan, unleashing a powerful tsunami that sent ships crashing into the shore and carried cars through the streets of coastal towns.

    Japan will get what it wants from the Group of Seven teleconference of finance ministers and central bankers Thursday night, but G-7 sources say the group is still waiting for Japan to ask.

  • A Libyan rebel fighter flashs the victory sign as he carries rocket propelled grenades at a check point near the key city of Ajdabiya on March 23, 2011 as government forces have encircled the town.

    It is often said that a picture speaks a thousand words, but these images arguably speak volumes about the violence and political turmoil in Libya and Bahrain.

  • Nuclear Power Plant

    As Japan’s nuclear crisis intensified Wednesday, governments across Europe remained at odds over whether to scale back nuclear power programs or continue plans to expand, reports the New York Times.

  • Indian Point Nuclear Plant

    As Japan's nuclear crisis continues to unfold, many are wondering whether the U.S.'s nuclear plants face a similar threat.  A look at where the risks are.

  • On March 11, 2011, an earthquake measuring 9.0 on the Richter scale struck Japan, bringing a destructive tsunami along with it. One of the sites most affected by the devastation was the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, which experienced a partial meltdown two days after the quake. The incident is being called the worst nuclear accident since the 1986 disaster at Chernobyl, and it has shown few signs of slowing down. Click ahead to see 11 other history-making nuclear disasters.

    On March 11, 2011, an earthquake measuring 9.0 on the Richter scale struck Japan, bringing a destructive tsunami along with it. See 11 other history-making nuclear disasters.

  • The International Energy Agency says Libyan oil exports have "ground to a halt" because of the fighting between rebels and forces loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi.

  • Pepsico's New Plant-Based Bottle

    PepsiCo on Tuesday unveiled a bottle made entirely of plant material, which it says bests the technology of competitor Coca-Cola and reduces its potential carbon footprint.

  • Following the huge losses on the Nikkei, with more than $700 billion dollars wiped off the Japanese market in just two sessions, one economist is predicting the tragic events in Japan will be an "excuse" 'to move to quantitative easing in all major markets.

  • The coal fueled Fiddlers Ferry power station emits vapour into the night sky on November 16, 2009 in Warrington, United Kingdom.

    The world's biggest nuclear power is France, where 58 plants generate 75 percent of the nation's electricity.

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    The biggest earthquake on record to hit Japan in 140 years sent stock markets across the globe sharply lower, while the yen and oil prices also fell.

  • The spike in the price of an oil barrel has been caused by “market pricing and risk premium on the future oil supply,” not a lack of supply, Rex Tillerson, CEO and chairman of Exxon Mobil, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • An oil refinery in Elizabeth, N.J. is shown in this aerial photo of Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2007. Oil prices extended their rise above $78 a barrel Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2007 after finishing at a record close the previous session as a production increase from OPEC failed to calm market concerns about the availability of supplies for winter in the Northern Hemisphere. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

    While US crude is usually seen as the best gauge for global oil prices, the recent tumult in the Middle East and North Africa is now making Brent a more reliable yardstick.

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    Speculators have set a new record for making bets whether oil will keep pushing higher, a trend that some market experts believe could push the commodity to record levels.

  • Throughout the recent unrest in the Middle East, virtually no oil production has been affected, save in Libya, Sara Akbar, CEO of Kuwait Energy, told CNBC Tuesday.

  • Global Warming

    It's time to stop taking crude oil and other fossil fuels for granted and start seriously developing new energy sources while practicing energy conservation.

  • jane_split_hawaii_wyoming_520.jpg

    I'm in Hawaii to cover the unique economic challenges facing the Aloha State. I'm also here to moderate the state's CFA annual forecast dinner.