Weather Environment

  • Sydney's Royal Botanic Gardens, home to 20,000 fruit bats is being forced to drive them out because of the damage done.

  • Floodwater engulfs a farm in Missouri

    Energy traders' fears are rising right along with the flood levels along the Mississippi River.

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    Enforcing pollution laws and investing in cleantech will save lives and money in the future.

  • Natural Gas

    We have not had an energy policy in the United States in the nearly three decades I have been in the utility business. What we have is a strange mix of mandates and markets that we sometimes call energy policy. Electricity—like horseracing, gambling and prostitution in Nevada—is too much fun for politicians to leave to the market.

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    Now that Earth Day 2011 is past, let's set our sights on making Earth Day 2012 a lot “greener” — in every sense of that word — with a bigger sense of urgency and a little help from some friends, says Terry Tamminen.

  • An Angolan woman shops in a market in Cabinda.

    Much like housing years ago, food has become something bigger than itself. It's about far more than sustenance. It's about commodities trading, global trade, energy, biotechnology and government policy. Our special report, "Food Economics, explores all of those dimensions.

  • Recent events in the Middle east and northern Africa have show that the supply and price of food can lead to major social unrest and even the downfall of a government. Many in the developed world take food for granted, but in most developing nations it can be a daily struggle and a life-and-death issue. The global recession of 2008-09 took some the wind out of surging agricultural prices, but there's growing concern that globalization will ultimately tax food supplies. Population and income grow

    Many in the developed world take food for granted, but in most developing nations it can be a daily struggle and a life-and-death issue. Click to see which countries are most vulnerable to food shock.

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    Farmers markets are popping up across the country as often as a new crop of corn. But the problem of making a profit—for themselves and the farmers that supply them—grows as well.

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    A growing interest in small-scale agriculture  — blending entrepreneurism and sustainability — is beginning to reverse a decades-long flight from the farm.

  • Reichstag Parliment building, Berlin, Germany

    Could there really be a "Green" German Chancellor one day? What would that mean? How "green" can Germany get? ... Questions I am being asked rather often these days - even and especially from outside Germany, says CNBC's Silvia Wadhwa.

  • A recent survey shows people in Hong Kong say it is acceptable to leave shark fin soup off banquet menus. The NYT reports.

  • Workers pull aboard boom being used to help block the flow of the oil spill from the Deepwater Horizon in Cat Bay on June 28, 2010 near Grand Isle, Louisiana.

    One year after the tragic BP oil spill, the cleanup isn't done and neither is the haggling over BP's  $20 billion dollar fund to compensate individuals and businesses over lost income.

  • CNBC Investing In Green Tech 2011

    The U.S. was an early leader in many areas, but has since slipped a bit. Some say cleantech could be the nest Internet and that the U.S. needs to exploit its considerable expertise. What do you think?

  • A boat works uses a protective boom to collect oil that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Exactly one year ago, on April 20th, 2010, shares in Transocean - already listed on the NYSE - started trading on the Swiss stock exchange.

  • Crisis in the Gulf

    Investing is a cold-hearted endeavor, and as the response to the BP spill evolved, investors tried to find ways to profit from it. Shares of oil-dispersant maker Nalco rose in the wake of the disaster but have since fallen, as its product is alleged to have been as bad for the ecology as the oil that spilled.

  • CNBC Investing In Green Tech 2011

    Oil and gas companies injected hundreds of millions of gallons of hazardous or carcinogenic chemicals into wells in more than 13 states from 2005 to 2009, according to an investigation by Congressional Democrats. The New York Times reports.

  • CNBC Investing In Green Tech 2011
  • CNBC Investing In Green Tech 2011

    Developing alternative fuels takes money and policies as much as it does will and time.  Take NASA as an example.

  • CNBC Investing In Green Tech 2011

    Optimists say there's plenty of untapped oil in the world. Skeptics say there's a finite amount and we're certain to run out. What do you think?