Weather Environment

  • Oil Refinery

    Oil prices have recovered from a short sharp sell-off late last month to hit fresh highs but could be about to sell off again, according to Julian Jessop, the chief international economist at Capital Economics.

  • A boat works uses a protective boom to collect oil that has leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Transocean acknowledged that its description of 2010 as its "best year in safety" despite a blowout that sank one of its rigs, killing 11 workers and causing a huge oil spill, might be insensitive.

  • Stocks closed mixed Monday with tech stocks lower after the market traded within a narrow range during much of a quiet session with the market at or near highs for the year.  Johnson & Johnson led the Dow higher, while HP fell.

  • Stocks gained moderate strength in the final hour of trading Monday, although largely remained within a narrow range, amid another quiet trading session with the market at or near highs for the year. Johnson & Johnson and Wal-Mart gained, while HP fell.

  • Stocks traded slightly higher amid another day of quiet trading and after a week of strong gains.. GE and Wal-Mart rose, while Intel fell.

  • Stock index futures rose slightly ahead of the open Monday as investors waited for direction from Federal Reserve speakers at the start of a week which will see central bank policy decisions take center stage.

  • BP sign

    BP will resume drilling in the Gulf of Mexico as early as July, less than 15 months after an accident that killed 11 workers and led to the worst offshore oil disaster in US waters, the Financial Times reports.

  • car_key_hands_200.jpg

    General Motors, Ford, Honda, Hyundai and Nissan all reported higher U.S. sales of new vehicles in March, helped by strong demand for models that get better gas mileage.

  • A pedestrian road has collapsed in the massive 8.9-magnitude earthquake in Urayasu city, Chiba prefecture. The earthquake shook Japan, unleashing powerful tsunamis that sent ships crashing into the shore and carried cars through the streets of coastal towns.

    There seems to be little news to merit any optimism. The challenges facing Japan are great and daunting. But let's not discount the resilience and determination of the Japanese and let's not dismiss the Japanese economy.

  • Mercedes

    Supply disruptions related to the earthquake and related crisis in Japan haven't affected Mercedes-Benz yet, but could down the road, warned Ernst Lieb, the automaker's U.S. CEO, in an interview with CNBC.

  • Quake-damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Futaba, Fukushima

    A CNBC analysis of how markets reacted to previous nuclear accidents may help explain and predict the impact of the emergency in Japan.

  • tsunami_japan_140.jpg

    The tsunami that devastated Japan's coast is a tragic reminder that we have an uneasy relationship with our oceans. If we do nothing to address climate change, by the end of this century ocean levels will rise 30 to 55 inches, turning future tsunami into full-blown disasters.

  • Natural Gas

    Natural gas may be having its day, as its rival energy sources come under a cloud. The serious problems at the nuclear power plant in Japan have raised new doubts about the safety of nuclear energy the New York Times reports.

  • 80-year-old Sumi Abe is rescued from her destroyed house nine days after the 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami on March 20, 2011 in Ishinomaki, Miyagi, Japan.

    In the wake of Japan’s cascading disasters, signs of economic loss can be found in many corners of the globe, from Sendai, on the battered Japanese coast, to Paris to Marion, Ark., reports the New York Times.

  • Fukushima Daiichi Plant_200.jpg

    Plans to develop new nuclear reactors may have to be put on hold until world leaders assess the causes of Japan's nuclear disaster and how to prevent a repeat of the accident, Luis Echavarri, director of the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency told CNBC.

  • international_business_deal_200.jpg

    The Group of Seven nations have agreed to a secret protocol to guide their coordinated intervention and won’t reveal it in order to keep currency markets guessing, according to people familiar with the matter.

  • As the market begins the process of second guessing the G7’s coordinated action to keep the yen lower, High Frequency Economics is warning investors the damage caused by the disaster in Japan is being both understated by the government and underappreciated outside of people in the immediate vicinity.

  • A factory building has collapsed in Sukagawa city, Fukushima prefecture, in northern Japan. A massive 8.9-magnitude earthquake shook Japan, unleashing a powerful tsunami that sent ships crashing into the shore and carried cars through the streets of coastal towns.

    Japan will get what it wants from the Group of Seven teleconference of finance ministers and central bankers Thursday night, but G-7 sources say the group is still waiting for Japan to ask.

  • A Libyan rebel fighter flashs the victory sign as he carries rocket propelled grenades at a check point near the key city of Ajdabiya on March 23, 2011 as government forces have encircled the town.

    It is often said that a picture speaks a thousand words, but these images arguably speak volumes about the violence and political turmoil in Libya and Bahrain.

  • Nuclear Power Plant

    As Japan’s nuclear crisis intensified Wednesday, governments across Europe remained at odds over whether to scale back nuclear power programs or continue plans to expand, reports the New York Times.