Weather Environment

  • Simulated oil splatter on a BP gas station sign in Manhattan, New York.

    BP’s internal inquiry into the causes of the disastrous Gulf of Mexico oil spill provoked an immediate backlash from contractors and  U.S. politicians who said the British group was “happy to slice up blame, as long as it gets the smallest piece”. The FT reports.

  • Making the economy more efficient by arguing who can cut the most wasteful carbon emissions—a bidding war that would only happen down under, right?

  • BP sign

    The cap that ended BP's three-month oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico was set to come off Thursday as a prelude to raising a massive, failed piece of equipment and preparing for a final seal on the broken seafloor well.

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    The Kraft says its Philadephia cream cheese is made using renewable energy sources.

  • West Virginia Patriot mining operations at the Guston strip mine just outside of Starcity West Virginia.

    Blasting off mountaintops to reach coal in Appalachia or churning out millions of tons of carbon dioxide to extract oil from sand in Alberta are among environmentalists’ biggest industrial irritants. But they are also legal and lucrative.

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    The Obama administration proposed on Monday two alternatives to the window stickers in new vehicles, including one that would assign letter grades for fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions. The New York Times reports.

  • A new survey finds the average price of regular gasoline in the United States has dropped 7.43 cents in the last two weeks. The Lundberg Survey of fuel prices released Sunday says the price of a gallon of regular fell to 2.70.

  • Transocean Offshore Installation Manager Chris Wokowsky stands on the deck of the Development Driller II, which is drilling a relief well, at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana.

    Engineers will start work Monday to remove the temporary cap out of BP's blown-out Gulf well so that crews can raise a key piece of equipment from the seabed.

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    After Hurricane Katrina, as the city lost billions of dollars in tourism business, the New Orleans Convention and Visitors Bureau embarked on a mission to overcome unprecedented brand impairment. Today, the tourism industry stands taller, stronger than before.

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    A major disaster sets the perfect stage for grandstanding. And nothing was more “major” at the time than Hurricane Katrina. Business and government leaders  laid out their dramatic plans to come to the rescue. 

  • Then And Now: New Orleans Five Years After The Katrina Disaster

    The Katrina anniversary is all about contrasts. More than one resident has called it a tale of two cities and, as cliched as that phrase may be, it certainly applies here.  Unemployment is below the national average, but poverty is twice the national rate.

  • Marine from Camp Lejeune, N.C., marks a home to indicate he found no occupants as houses in the lower Ninth Ward are checked for bodies or people who are still stranded more than two weeks after Hurricane Katrina hit.

    To really know if we have succeeded, to really know if we have created a New Orleans region better than before, we have to go out ten years. Here we will find the “new normal” that will come to pass after the Katrina money has run dry, and the economy is left to stand on its own.

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    It's a tall order to transform New Orleans by 2030, but that's the aim of the city's new master plan—five years after Hurricane Katrina hobbled this historic place and the surrounding Gulf coast region.

  • BP sign

    BP said Thursday that it decided not to bid for a drilling license near Greenland, a move government officials there say may be due to its tarnished safety image after the disastrous blowout of a deepwater well in the Gulf of Mexico.

  • new_orleans_surge_barrier_200.jpg

    Nearly five years after Katrina and the devastating failures of the levee system, New Orleans is well on its way to getting the protection system Congress ordered: a ring of 350 miles of linked levees, flood walls, gates and pumps that surrounds the city and should defend it against the kind of flooding that in any given year has a 1 percent chance of occurring.

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    A bill in California could pass this week banning wasteful single-use plastic bags if state legislators can be convinced that consumers can bring his/her own sack for carting off a loaf of bread.

  • Gavel

    Federal investigators are hearing testimony from BP executives in a joint probe into the cause of the explosion that led to the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

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    Using infrared and microwave images of the entire planet taken twice a day, Lanworth can distinguish between each type of agricultural commodity—corn, soybeans, wheat and on and on—and discover the total number of acres of each planted overall.

  • Simulated oil splatter on a BP gas station sign in Manhattan, New York.

    Though BP owns just a fraction of the United States service stations that carry its brand, independent station owners are suffering from public reaction to the oil spill. The NYT reports.