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Europe News Europe

  • Silvio Berlusconi's resurgence and the rise of a foul-mouthed populist comedian have thrown Italy's weekend election wide open, with deep uncertainty over whether the poll can produce a positive outcome.

  • The European Central Bank made 555 million euros ($732 million) last year from Greek sovereign bonds acquired under its first bond-buy plan.

  • For more than a century unskilled Italians have gone abroad to escape poverty, but these days the people running for the exits are among the country's top brains.

  • Iceland

    Iceland's biggest IT company CCP is what the island needs to leave its economic crisis behind. It is global, growing and employs hundreds but its tale is also one of frustration that echoes concerns about the country's future.

  • Silvio Berlusconi

    The president of the European Parliament, warned Italians on Thursday not to back the scandal-ridden media tycoon at the ballot box.

  • Spain sold more bonds than it had targeted in its third debt sale of the week on Thursday, as the Treasury makes the most of a recent easing in investor concerns.

  • With the ability to produce electricity far beyond the requirements of its population, Iceland is looking into the possibility of laying an enormous "extension cord", which would enable them to export to the huge European market.

  • Shareholders of coal miner Bumi will vote on co-founder Nat Rothschild's overhaul plan and a bid to oust the current board on Thursday in a public showdown.

  • Just three months after Hong Kong rolled out a tough new round of property cooling measures, home prices have again climbed to record highs with demand unusually strong for new flats.

  • St. Peter's Basilica in Rome, Italy.

    Regardless of who wins next weekend's parliamentary election, Italy's long economic decline is likely to continue because the next government won't be strong enough to pursue the tough reforms needed to make its economy competitive again.

  • The head of U.S. tire maker Titan launched a vitriolic attack on French productivity after the country’s government suggested he buy a factory in the north of France.

  • Nicosia, Cyprus

    Cyprus faces a "material and rising risk" of defaulting on its sovereign debt, especially if the euro zone and International Monetary Fund do not come up with aid, rating agency Standard & Poor's said on Wednesday.

  • greece financial crisis--1922986959_v2.jpg

    Tens of thousands of Greeks took to the streets of Athens on Wednesday during a nationwide strike against wage cuts and high taxes that kept ferries stuck in ports, schools shut and hospitals with only emergency staff.

  • Santander.jpg

    Spanish lender Santander shrank its directors' pay by almost 35 percent in 2012 as profits fell, with Chairman Emilio Botin taking one of the bigger cuts in remuneration among top executives.

  • The Euro Zone Is ‘Shaping Up Quite Well’: Think Tank

    Investor optimism about the euro zone tally with an untimely credit squeeze within the bloc over the past couple of months.

  • The number of Britons in work hit a new all-time high late last year and the number of people claiming unemployment benefit fell much more than expected in January, official data showed on Wednesday.

  • Eiffel Tower in Paris, France.

    A British-based private equity consortium is preparing a bid of 3.5 billion euros for French catering company Elior in what would be the biggest buyout in continental Europe since Lehman Brothers collapsed in 2008.

  • Italian showman Beppe Grillo

    Italy's mainstream politicians have failed to understand a change in mentality in Italy, the head of the anti-establishment "5 Star Movement" (M5S) told CNBC in an interview, adding that his party is now "unstoppable".

  • A sign reading "Visit our pilot housing, funded by Bankia" stands near new residential apartment blocks under construction in Navalcarnero, near Madrid, Spain.

    Banks in Spain may take bigger losses than they hoped this year on real estate repossessed from borrowers, as they compete for buyers with the agency clearing up the weaker banks.

  • Credit Agricole posted a 6.5 billion-euro ($8.68 billion) full-year loss - the worst since the French bank went public in 2001 - as taxes on the sale of its Greek unit pushed the bank even deeper into the red than expected.