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Central Banks European Central Bank

  • Spain

    Mariano Rajoy, Spain’s prime minister, has called for centralized control of national budgets in the eurozone in an unexpected gesture to mollify Brussels and Berlin on the eve of what is expected to be a crucial week for Madrid. The FT reports.

  • Scream 3

    Like the third sequel to a summer horror movie, stocks are set up for another selloff amid worries about a double-dip recession. "I’m starting to fear summer," one economist said.

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    The weak jobs report underscored America's economic crisis but also a bigger risk for the market: a synchronized global slowdown. El-Erian weighs in on what it means for investors.

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    The “Mad Money” host wants U.S. leaders to intervene in Europe’s debt crisis.

  • Federal_reserve_blg_seal3.jpg

    A confidence-crushing May jobs report has turned market talk back to more Fed easing. But how much more can the central bank do with Treasury yields at record lows?

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    Unemployment and Spanish bank woes weigh on the euro, and Britain has a smashing new coin — it's time for your FX Fix.

  • Joseph Stiglitz

    The European Central Bank has the ability to do more to tackle to the euro zone’s debt crisis than it has been doing, Nobel Laureate and Professor at Columbia University Joseph Stiglitz told CNBC’s “Worldwide Exchange” Friday.

  • Simon Derrick, head of the Bank of New York Mellon's currency strategy team, has put together some "scary numbers" about the euro zone crisis.

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    Mario Draghi, the European Central Bank president who pulled the Continent back from the financial brink late last year, is facing an even more daunting challenge as the debt crisis in Spain deepens. But this time, he may have a harder time fashioning a rescue plan that will work, the New York Times reports.

  • Spain

    Madrid was dealt a double blow on Thursday after it emerged that almost €100bn in capital had left the country in the first three months of the year and the head of the European Central Bank lambasted its handling of Bankia, the troubled Spanish lender.

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    An Irish vote could spell good luck for the euro, and Swiss growth is surging - it's time for your FX Fix.

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    Markets will face more difficulty as the protracted euro zone debt crisis limps along before things begin to get better and capital preservation dominates investors’ minds, one market expert told CNBC Thursday.

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    US benchmark borrowing costs plunged to levels last seen in 1946 and those for Germany and the UK hit all-time lows as investors took fright at what they see as a disjointed policy response to the debt crisis in Spain and Italy, the Financial Times reports.

  • Ireland and European Union

    While the euro zone bickers over how to stimulate growth, the process of implementing the austerity element of Berlin’s vision for Europe grinds on.

  • Zoe Konstantopoulou, a member of parliament for the left-wing, anti-bailout Greek party Syriza told CNBC that Greece’s bailout deal was a “death sentence for Greek society.” 

  • Spain

    A Spanish plan to recapitalise Bankia, the troubled lender, by indirectly tapping the European Central Bank for cash, was bluntly rejected as unacceptable by the ECB, European officials said, the Financial Times reports.

  • European Central Bank

    The European bailout of 130 billion euros ($163.4 billion) that was supposed to buy time for Greece is mainly servicing only the interest on the country’s debt — while the Greek economy continues to struggle, the New York Times reports.

  • European Union Flag

    Tens of billions of funding support for European banks appears to have shifted to the emergency lending assistance program of the European Central Bank from the long-term refinancing operations, an indication that some European banks may be in dire financial straits.

  • Ireland and European Union

    Irish voters head to the polls Thursday to vote on the new European treaty – but with substantial numbers of undecided voters, the result is far from a foregone conclusion and could isolate the country from the rest of the European Union.

  • A one Euro coin stands on a map of Brussels.

    Faced with so much market volatility and uncertainty, fund managers say they have sharply scaled back their exposure to countries in the euro-era “periphery”. They have, moreover, become highly selective about investing in banks, the Financial Times reports.