Central Banks European Central Bank

  • E.U. Flags

    Standard and Poor's should've waited at least a week to announce it had put 15 European Union nations on its CreditWatch for potential downgrade, said the chairman of tire maker Pirelli.

  • The European crisis is at a key point this week, and there are meetings galore on resolving it. Here's how to ride them out.

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    Standard and Poor’s has warned Germany and five other triple-A rated members of the euro zone that they risk having their top-notch ratings downgraded as a result of deepening economic and political turmoil in the single-currency bloc.

  • Critical Week forEuro

    The euro is holding firm against the dollar, boosted by optimism on Italian austerity measures and the Merkel-Sarkozy meeting, with Marc Chandler, Brown Brothers Harriman.

  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel

    Now that the euro has bankrupted Greece and pushed Italy and other Mediterranean states to the brink, Angela Merkel proposes tough, EU-administered disciplines on national deficits.

  • European Central Bank

    Markets appear to have high hopes for this week’s summit meeting in Europe to begin putting an end to the financial crisis. Yet there’s ample reason to believe the market’s hopes will be dashed again. Here's why.

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    European leaders huddle and the euro lifts - it's time for your FX Fix.

  • Merkel, Sarkozy to Tackle Euro Zone Issues on Monday

    As the German chancellor, Angela Merkel, and the French president, Nicolas Sarkozy, are about to meet in Paris, CNBC's Annette Weisbach in Frankfurt and Stephane Pedrazzi in Paris discuss what will be on the meeting's agenda.

  • Europe's Stability & Growth Pact

    Tai Hui, Regional Head of Economic Research, SE Asia at Standard Chartered Bank, Singapore, talks about Europe's long-term problems, which remain despite the coordinated move by central banks.

  • European Central Bank

    Europe's sovereign-debt crisis, which has dragged on for more than two years, is entering a pivotal week, as leaders across the continent converge to prevent a collapse of the euro and a financial panic from spreading.

  • The International Monetary Fund (IMF) headquarters building is seen in Washington, DC.

    The International Monetary Fund may be asked to assist further as leaders of the 17 European Union nations that use the euro prepare for a summit next week, reports the New York Times.

  • Christchurch, New Zealand

    Expectations are high for the upcoming European Union summit. Here's how to trade if reality falls short.

  • Capitalizing on Central Bank Blitz

    The currency trade behind next week's slew of central bank meetings, with CNBC's Simon Hobbs and the Money In Motion traders.

  • Money Match Up

    Will next week's EU summit ruin the risk on rally? The currency trade behind next week's EU meeting, with CNBC's Simon Hobbs and the Money in Motion traders. And will Mario Draghi increase the roll of the ECB, with Deutsche Bank's Joe LaVorgna?

  • CNBC.com Market Outlook

    The week's top business news and investment advice, including Europe plays & banking shorts.

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    With signs of progress on the European debt crisis, is it time to buy the euro? It depends against what.

  • Focus on EU Summit

    CNBC's Simon Hobbs has the story on the highly anticipated European Union summit next week as proposals are already starting to leak out.

  • What's The Deal With Europe

    CNBC's Jane Wells asks Americans what they think about the crisis in Europe.

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    U.S. futures were little changed after nonfarm payrolls were about in line with expectations at 123,000, but the headline unemployment rate of 8.6 percent, well below expectations of 9 percent, and October nonfarm payrolls were revised upward.

  • Enron

    A number of similarities exist between the collapse of Enron in 2001 and the current sovereign debt crisis in the euro zone, Joe Berardino, CEO at Alvarez & Marsal and the former CEO of Enron's accounting firm, Arthur Andersen, told CNBC.