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Central Banks European Central Bank

  • Reichstag Parliment building, Berlin, Germany

    The German obsession with inflation has been difficult to overcome because Germans perceive themselves as more vulnerable to inflation today than their neighbors are, writes Nicholas Kulish in the New York Times.

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    Home sales rise and prices stabilize, growth is better than expected, Obama beats Romney and the euro survives and prospers.

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    The euro plunges against the U.S. currency, gold prices slump, and the Euro debt crisis  bailout costs $2 trillion.

  • Great Wall of China

    China's move this week to keep its economy afloat isn't getting the big headlines that Europe got, but it may be more significant for the world economy.  Here's why.

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.

    Federal Reserve assistance to shore up Europe's sagging banks may be good geo-politics but it is bad economics. Only abandoning the euro, not printing money and Teutonic austerity, will fix Europe's banks and economies.

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    The U.S. is "Italy lagged about three years" unless the deficit is closed by 2013, former National Economic Council director Lawrence Lindsey told CNBC Thursday.

  • Money in Motion

    Amelia Bourdeau, Westpac Institutional Bank, discusses what's going to happen to the dollar on Friday's jobs report.

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    As European Union leaders prepare for yet another crisis summit meeting next week to discuss fundamental changes in economic governing, there are growing concerns that the latest potential approach will not be enough to stabilize the markets and preserve the euro. The NYT reports.

  • European Central Bank

    Bulgaria still wants to join the euro zone despite recent predictions that the single currency will collapse, but does not agree with a single tax rate in the currency area, Traicho Traikov, minister of economy for Bulgaria, told CNBC on Thursday.

  • Europeans keep negotiating, and Spain and France navigate bond sales - it's time for your FX Fix.

  • Traders work on the floor of the London Metal Exchange in London, U.K., on Friday, Aug. 5, 2011. Stocks dropped for an eighth day, the longest losing streak since January 2010, and commodities declined on concern the U.S. recovery is faltering. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images

    A move announced by central bankers on Wednesday to contain the European debt crisis resulted in euphoria in global stock markets, but it also prompted skeptics to wonder: will this time be different? The New York Times reports.

  • European Central Bank

    The European Central Bank could take on a greater role in attempts to tackle the debt crisis in the euro zone, conditional on national governments implementing economic reforms, Silvio Peruzzo, European Economist at RBS told CNBC.

  • Risk in the Markets

    If Europe moves from calamity to a chronic debt situation, the market will see improvement, says James Paulsen, Wells Capital Management chief investment strategist.

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    Stocks in Asia surged on Thursday, after the coordinated action by global central banks. But according to a number of analysts CNBC spoke to, the rally is unlikely to last, as the move merely buys time for Europe's leaders and doesn’t solve the region’s fundamental debt problems.

  • Betty Davis in 'All About Eve'

    Calling Bette Davis - there is plenty of fuel for a continued bumpy ride in the currency markets, this strategist says.

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    The euro has had a nice move up on reports of actual progress by European leaders on the debt crisis. But this strategist has other ideas.

  • Movies are filled with nail-biting moments of split-second disaster aversion. We hope that many of the world’s more difficult dilemmas will also be met with similar Hollywood-style happy endings.

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    Banks are the great poison of the stock market these days—not because of what is known about them, but rather what is unknown.

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    The concept of ‘hopium’ – that bizarre concoction of hope and optimism that may synthesize into an ‘economic drug,’ propelling the economy into an upward spiral, says CNBC's Brian Sullivan.

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    Currency swap spreads are contracting, volatility is falling and stocks are soaring following a coordinated move by central banks to make dollars cheaper.