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  • Hacking hacker cyber security

    Law enforcement agencies nationwide are being hit with ransomware viruses, NBCNews reports.

  • Microsoft vs. US government

    Raj Goel, Brainlink Chief Technology Officer, and Jeff Lanza, Retired FBI Special Agent, debate who's right in the latest fight for your security or your privacy.

  • FBI Director James Comey

    The FBI's secret method for unlocking the iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters would not work the later models.

  • A trader works at the Israeli stock exchange.

    Tech and cyber-security know-how, startup spirit, VC funds and even the climate make Israel a bit like the Bay Area, says Richard Beales.

  • Apple out of correction territory

    Nehal Chokshi, Maxim Group, shares his thoughts on Apple's new iPhone, the impact of its war on encryption on the stock, and where he sees the stock heading from here.

  • Cellebrite, the Israeli company that may have helped the FBI hack a terrorist's iPhone, may have used their Universal Forensic Extraction Device to do the job.

  • Apple vs. bears & the FBI

    Jon Brod, Co-Founder of both AOL Ventures and Confide, and Mike Isaac, Tech Correspondent for the New York Times, discuss Apple's exit from the bear market as well as the company's recent fight with the FBI.

  • Apple vs. FBI - who won?

    After news that the FBI had gained access to the contentious iPhone without Apple's help, technology lawyer Mark Grossman and criminal defense attorney Randy Zelin debate who fared better in the public eye: Apple or the U.S. government.

  • FBI didn't need Apple

    CNBC's Eamon Javers reports the latest in the story that the FBI has unlocked the iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino shooters without the help of Apple.

  • The Apple iPhone 6.

    The CNBC All-America Economic Survey shows 57 percent of Americans agreeing that privacy trumps needs of law enforcement in the encryption debate.

  • Discussing news the government was able to hack into a terrorist's iPhone, with former Apple chief evangelist Guy Kawasaki.

  • Foursquare co-founder talks securing customer info

    The government says it was able to access the iPhone of one of the San Bernardino terrorists without Apple's help. Foursquare co-founder Dennis Crowley, discusses keeping customer data safe, and evolving security technology.

  • Rep. Issa: Those worried about privacy should stay wary

    After news the government cracked into the iPhone of one of the San Bernardino terrorists without Apple's help, Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) discusses law enforcement and protecting information.

  • Steven Levy talks encryption: I once went to the NSA

    Backchannel editor in chief Steven Levy, shares his view on news the government was able to hack into the terrorist's iPhone without Apple's help.

  • Government's way out of Apple fight

    The government says it cracked the iPhone of one of the San Bernardino shooters without Apple's help. Former Apple PR Rep. Andy Cunningham; CNBC's Michael Santoli and; the "Squawk on the Street" crew, provide perspective on the news.

  • Public supports Apple over FBI: CNBC survey

    CNBC's Steve Liesman reveals the exclusive results of CNBC's survey on how Americans felt about the right to privacy versus security concerns.

  • DOJ unlocks iPhone, drops legal action against Apple

    CNBC's Josh Lipton reports on the reaction from Silicon Valley on word the Justice Department found a way to unlock the iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters.

  • Walking encryption tightrope

    Walter Isaacson, Aspen Institute CEO, weighs in on the privacy debate and regulating encryption.

  • FBI gains access to iPhone

    The high-profile legal battle between Apple and the U.S. government is officially over after the FBI managed to unlock the iPhone used by the San Bernardino terrorist without the tech giant's help, reports CNBC's Eamon Javers.

  • DOJ cracks iPhone

    CNBC's Eamon Javers reports the high-profile legal battle between Apple and the U.S. government is officially over after the FBI managed to unlock the iPhone used by the San Bernardino terrorist without the tech giant's help.