Government Agencies FBI

More

  • Is government-proof encryption next?

    Discussing the issue of privacy versus security in light of Apple's fight with the FBI with Mary Galligan, former cyber chief at the FBI, Deloitte & Touche's Cyber Risk Services Practice.

  • Public sentiment shouldn't decide action in Apple/FBI fight

    Jason Calacanis, CEO & Founder of Inside.com, discusses Apple asking Congress to weigh in on its stand-off with the FBI and how the public is reacting.

  • Rep. Pompeo: Apple-FBI case easy

    Apple CEO Tim Cook and the FBI Director James Comey have been asked to testify before the House Energy and Commerce Committee. Rep. Mike Pompeo (R-Kan.) of the Energy & Commerce Committee, says Apple needs to give the information over to the government.

  • Apple's fight just a PR move?

    Discussing Apple's fight with the FBI and whether this is just a business decision or a greater security issue are Eli Dourado, Director of Technology at Mercatus Center and Nathan Hecht, DStrux CEO.

  • A man walks outside the Apple store on the Fifth Avenue in New York on February 17, 2016.

    Neither the FBI nor Apple are clear winners when it comes to consumer attitudes.

  • I think Apple will lose this case: Ret. FBI deputy director

    Discussing the law enforcement angle of the Apple/FBI fight is Timothy Murphy, Retired FBI Deputy Director and Thomson Reuters Specials Services President.

  • The tug and pull between privacy and security

    Discussing Bill Gates weighing in on the Apple/FBI stand-off is AOL Ventures co-founder Jon Brod.

  • Loretta Lynch: We must protect people

    Speaking in Washington, Attorney General Loretta Lynch sides with law enforcement on the issue of Apple's fight with the FBI. CNBC's Eamon Javers reports.

  • Gen. Hayden: No black and white between privacy and security

    Former NSA Director Gen. Michael Hayden, discusses his new book, "Playing to the Edge" which chronicles his tenure as the head of national security.

  • Defending Apple: Gen. Hayden

    America is more safe with end-to-end encryption, says former NSA Director Gen. Michael Hayden, discussing the politics of privacy and why the nation is safer without back doors.

  • Bill Gates backs FBI hack request

    Billionaire Bill Gates breaks ranks with Silicon Valley in the fight between Apple and the FBI over encryption.

  • Tim Cook, CEO, Apple

    The majority said Apple should unlock the iPhone used by a shooter in the San Bernardino terrorist attack. Re/code reports.

  • Apple CEO Tim Cook.

    Apple is right to fight the FBI's demand for a backdoor into Sayed Farook's iPhone, says Rick Orloff, who calls it a "slippery slope."

  • Weighing the risks and benefits of Apple complying with FBI

    Aneesh Chopra, Fmr. US Chief Technology Officer, discusses the fight between Apple and the FBI, including how threatening a potential backdoor could be in the wrong hands.

  • Apple in an awkward position: Tim Cook

    CNBC's Eamon Javers reports on the latest in the fight between Apple and the FBI, including a letter from Tim Cook to his employees.

  • Amb. Jeffrey: Tim Cook is right

    Former Deputy National Security Advisor Amb. James Jeffrey, suspects the courts will support the government in the Apple case, but fears the consequential dangers of the unlocking capability.

  • Rep. Issa: Creating a backdoor is unlawful, unwise & unsafe

    Rep. Darrell Issa, Oversight & Government Reform Committee Chairman, (R) California explains why he's on Apple's side in the fight against the FBI.

  • Tim Cook: This case bigger than a single phone

    Apple CEO Tim Cook sent a letter to employees saying "we knew we had to speak out" upon receiving the government order, reports CNBC's Eamon Javers. Jim Cramer, weighs in.

  • Apple's public battle heats up

    CNBC's Landon Dowdy reports the latest developments in the standoff between Apple and the FBI.

  • John McAfee: I can crack the iPhone

    John McAfee, McAfee Founder, discusses his offer to unlock the iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino shooters, privacy concerns, and a potential global cyber war.