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Government Agencies FDA

  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned that popular acne products can cause rare but serious and life-threatening allergic reactions.

  • Cubist advances Sivextro

    Michael Bonney, Cubist Pharmaceuticals CEO, discusses the FDA's approval of Sivextro, a new antibiotic designed to treat skin infections. Bonney also explains why so many pharma companies have left the antibiotic space.

  • Genetics startup 23andMe said it is one step closer to resuming sales of its full-fledged health product.

  • POM Wonderful may take Coke to court to accuse it of misleadingly marketing one of its Minute Maid juices, the U.S. Supreme Court said.

  • Ariad CEO talks Iclusig trials

    Ariad Pharmaceuticals CEO Dr. Harvey Berger, says investors are responding to his company's better overall picture, and the progress on its leukemia drug Iclusig.

  • Walnuts by Sherman Produce recalled due to possible health risk.

    Two companies issued voluntary recalls of hummus dips and walnuts sold at major retailers after listeria was detected in samplings of the products.

  • LabDoor sheds light on supplement world

    Unlike prescription drugs the FDA does not inspect vitamins before they hit the market. Neil Thanedar, LabDoor CEO, provides independent product safety research and grading to help consumers learn what's really inside their vitamins.

  • Ethics of 'right to try' laws

    Lawmakers in four states are considering changing the rules to allow terminally ill people access to experimental drugs before they have FDA approval. Kenneth Goodman, University of Miami, thinks this would be a bad bet for patients. Miles Nadal, MDC Partners Chairman & CEO, weighs in.

  • The FDA said that people should use daily aspirin therapy only after assessing the benefits and risks.

  • Power Rundown: E-cig proposed regulations

    CNBC's Seema Mody, Bob Pisani and Tyler Mathisen looks at today's "Power Lunch" stories, including news the FDA is proposing the first regulations on electronic cigarettes.

  • FDA to regulate e-cigs

    Blu eCigs founder Jason Healy, discusses the FDA's "science based" proposed rules that call for strict regulation of electronic cigarettes. The measures will range from age restrictions to health warnings.

  • FDA proposes e-cigarette regulations

    The FDA is considering new rules for e-cigarettes that are similar to those that currently govern tobacco products, reports NBC's Tom Costello.

  • Sarepta CEO 'optimistic' for muscle drug approval

    Sarepta Therapeutics CEO Chris Garabedian discusses the prospects for what he calls a "potential accelerated approval" for its Duchenne muscular dystrophy drug Eteplirsen.

  • Sarepta muscle drug faces challenges

    Sarepta Therapeutics is developing a drug for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Its CEO Chris Garabedian discusses challenges the drug Eteplirsen has faced before the FDA.

  • A Customs and Border Protection Agriculture Specialist inspects an international food shipment at the port of Newark

    With rising food rates and an increase in food imports, food fraud is a growing problem that costs the industry up to $15 billion a year.

  • The Cefaly device uses a mild electric current to prevent migraines.

  • The Zohydro debate: More harm than good?

    Powerful new pain killer Zohydro, is prescribed to help people with chronic pain. Dr. Andrew Kolodny thinks the FDA has put out a drug that will kill people. Dr. Steven Garner, New York Methodist Hospital, thinks the drug will help many people who are suffering with lasting pain.

  • Controversial drug Zohydro here to stay?

    CNBC's Sheila Dharmarajan discusses the new pain killer Zohydro which contains the same addictive elements as Oxycodone.

  • Controversy grows over potent pain drug Zohydro

    Some medical experts and lawmakers are urging the FDA to reconsider its approval of the new narcotic painkiller Zohyrdo, reports CNBC's Sheila Dharmarajan.

  • Annie's CEO: Lowered guidance on higher commodity price

    John Foraker, Annie's CEO, discusses why its consumers are interested in non-GMO products. "Lowering our guidance had nothing to do with genetically modified ingredients," he explains.