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Weather Floods

  • A New York City Police car drives through a flooded intersection on 43nd Street in New York on August 28, 2011 as Hurricane Irene hits the city and Tri State area with rain and high winds.

    As the rain has moved past New York City and Long Island and wind gusts have subsided, it seems to me that we can learn some things from the experience that relate to the government's current handling of the economy.

  • Insurance Stocks in the Spotlight

    Insurance stocks are in the spotlight in the aftermath of Irene. Insight with Brian Meredith, UBS insurance analyst.

  • Susan Petrella, lower left, stands near the King Neptune statue as the first wind and rain of Hurricane Irene blow in on August 27, 2011 in Virginia Beach, VA.

    The eye of Irene made its way over the New York City Sunday, rolling directly over the borough of Queens, and though the storm unleashed intense rains and heavy winds on the city, it was downgraded to a tropical storm from a hurricane.

  • A fallen tree which also knocked over a power line is seen on Loughboro Road after Hurricane Irene swept through the area.

    Hurricane Irene was the 'Perfect Storm' for insurers in a different sense of the cliche. The weakened storm that spared New York city from major damage gave the wealthy and rarely hit Northeast enough of a scare because of ominous weather forecasts leading up the storm that property insurers will be able to raise pricing even more next year, according to a Morgan Stanley analyst.

  • A taxi passes by a warning sign on the side of the Port Authority in New York on August 28, 2011 as Hurricane Irene hits the city and the Tri State area with rain and high winds. Irene weakened to tropical storm status Sunday as it hit New York City.

    Hurricane Irene will take a very small bite out of a U.S. economy already struggling with debt and unemployment after businesses across the East Coast closed their doors ahead of the deadly storm.

  • A police officer patrols the beach next to the synthetic plank boardwalk in Spring Lake, New Jersey, which was mostly destroyed and rendered unusable by Hurricane Irene.

    Beaches along the Atlantic coast took a beating over the weekend from Hurricane Irene, which caused heavy damage to some popular seaside tourist towns while sparing others the worst of its powerful wind and waves.

  • The people of Mineral, Va., were starting to whether Mother Nature had it in for them.

  • Plastic tape blocks the entrance to the Chambers St subway station August 27, 2011 in New York City. In anticipation of a large storm or hurricane hitting the city, the New York City mass transit network, the nation’s largest, closed at noon on Saturday, ending subway, bus, and commuter rail service until Monday.

    Damage from Irene appears to be less than feared, a bit of reassuring news for a fragile economy.

  • irene_camry_submerged_nj_200.jpg

    From North Carolina to Pennsylvania, Hurricane Irene appeared to have fallen short of the doomsday predictions. But with rivers still rising, and roads impassable because of high water and fallen trees, it could be days before the full extent of the damage is known.

  • Plastic tape blocks the entrance to the Chambers St subway station August 27, 2011 in New York City. In anticipation of a large storm or hurricane hitting the city, the New York City mass transit network, the nation’s largest, closed at noon on Saturday, ending subway, bus, and commuter rail service until Monday.

    Hurricane Irene and the closure of at least 1,000 theater locations along the East Coast is expected to put a dent in this weekend's domestic box office.

  • So far in 2011, the storm of the Hurricane season is Irene, a category 2 hurricane that is expected to affect the Eastern US  The storm has already passed through the Carribean, causing widespread damage while the Eastern US prepares for landfall. The entire eastern seaboard is being told to expect high winds and flooding as a result of the storm, although the resulting damage is anyone's guess. CNBC.com will be updating this slideshow with fresh images of the storm as they come in, illustrating

    From emergency preparation to landfall, see how the Northeast is impacted by Hurricane Irene.

  • With more than 50 million people potentially in Hurricane Irene's path, residents along the US east coast stocked up on food and water and worked to secure homes, vehicles and boats.

  • Hurricane

    Hurricane Irene is expected to cause billions of dollars in damage in 14 states along the eastern U.S. seacoast, but property/casualty insurance companies are not expected to see much of a hit from damage claims.

  • Residents in N.C. Prep for Irene

    CNBC's Kayla Tausche has the story on how residents in North Carolina are preparing for the hurricane.

  • NYC's Financial Flood Zones

    CNBC's Courtney Reagan has the details on New Yorkers preparing for a possible evacuation in anticipation of strong storm surges from Hurricane Irene.

  • Hurricane Irene: Preparing for Power Outages

    Advice for residents of the Northeast during a possible power outage, with Vanessa Baird-Streeter, Long Island Power Authority.

  • Heading Into Irene's Path

    The Weather Channel's Mike Siedel has the details on how North Carolina, and particularly the Outer Banks, is preparing for a potentially intense hurricane, with Dare County Commissioner Mike Johnson.

  • With forecasters predicting 12 to 18 named storms in 2011, homeowners in the Southern United States may already be looking past the sunny days of summer and bracing for the hurricane season. Insurance providers have already bet on it. Homeowners in certain hurricane prone states are at the mercy of an entirely separate insurance market — the so-called “market of last resort” — created to pick up the slack from private insurers who don't provide coverage for hurricanes — or, for that matter, torn

    See average annual homeowners insurance premiums in these states, as well as average windstorm insurance premiums from the least expensive to the most expensive.

  • Stormy Weather - A CNBC Special Report

    Six years after Hurricane Katrina and countless subsequent disasters many are still questioning the effectiveness of  the Federal Emergency Management Agency . 

  • Stormy Weather - A CNBC Special Report

    This year has already been a record one for storm damage, with more severe weather of all kinds.