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  • Farrell: Germany's Southern Discomfort Wednesday, 19 May 2010 | 11:08 AM ET
    Greece

    Germany and France can't borrow or tax enough to cover all the debts of their southern neighbors.

  • What Will German Short Ban Mean for Investors? Wednesday, 19 May 2010 | 4:20 AM ET
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    Germany's ban on kinds of naked short selling will have no effect on investors' ability to bet on declining prices, analysts told CNBC.

  • Nouriel Roubini

    Current efforts to reform financial regulation are “cosmetic” and won’t prevent another crisis, economist Nouriel Roubini said Tuesday.

  • Morici: Lessons from Greece for the United States Tuesday, 18 May 2010 | 4:52 PM ET
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    As the Flash Crash in U.S. equity markets May 6 illustrated, problems in Greece can have grave consequences for not merely other Mediterranean economies and Europe, but U.S. and the broader global economy.

  • March 2009 Lows Will Be Tested: Strategist Tuesday, 18 May 2010 | 5:22 AM ET

    The stock markets' March 2009 lows could be tested and even broken as sovereign debt continues to grow in Europe and stimulus measures wane, Philippe Gijsels, head of research at BNP Paribas Fortis global markets, told CNBC.com Tuesday.

  • Could America Live with European Austerity? Tuesday, 18 May 2010 | 4:26 AM ET
    Riot policemen push back demonstrators as they try to approach the finance ministry in Athens.

    European finance ministers meet in Brussels Tuesday and much of the talk will focus on how the sinners can be punished.

  • How Close Did Europe Come to Lehman-Style Crisis? Monday, 17 May 2010 | 4:15 AM ET
    european_union_crack2_200.jpg

    1st paragraph of story should go here

  • Fears Intensify that Euro Crisis Could Snowball Monday, 17 May 2010 | 3:52 AM ET
    Euro bills and coins

    After a brief respite following the announcement last week of a nearly $1 trillion bailout plan for Europe, fear in the financial markets is building again, this time over worries that the Continent’s biggest banks face strains that will hobble European economies, the New York Times reported.

  • UK Stops Supplying €500 Notes to Fight Crime Thursday, 13 May 2010 | 9:01 AM ET
    euro500.jpg

    Banknote wholesalers will no longer supply the 500 euro note in the UK as part of measures to prevent money laundering, the Serious Organized Crime Agency (SOCA) announced Thursday on its Web site.

  • ECB's 'Bazooka' Fights Speculators, Hurts Euro Thursday, 13 May 2010 | 4:03 AM ET
    The European Debt Crisis - See Complete Coverage

    The European Central Bank's decision to buy government bonds in the secondary markets will likely stop speculators, but it may push the euro down by more than 10 percent.

  • 'Psychotic' Dow Swings Leave Europe Gun Shy Wednesday, 12 May 2010 | 5:44 AM ET
    New York Stock Exchange

    Last Thursday’s intraday volatility, which saw the Dow plummeting nearly 1000 points, has left European investors tentative about Wall Street, according to market participants.

  • Great Recovery an 'Illusion': Economist Wednesday, 12 May 2010 | 4:56 AM ET
    global_economy_down.jpg

    The great recovery is an illusion, and the banking crisis is likely to be very costly for the world economy, according to economist Jamie Dannhauser at Lombard Street Research.

  • Debt Aid Package for Europe Took Nudge From Washington Tuesday, 11 May 2010 | 10:47 AM ET
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel

    Weeks of hesitant half-steps to address Greece’s debt problems had only worsened market worries about the euro, and were threatening the still-fragile economic recoveries in the United States and Asia. In response, President Obama told Mrs. Merkel that the Europeans needed an overwhelming financial rescue to end speculation that the euro — and European unity — could crumble. The NYT reports.

  • Big-Bang, Trillion-Dollar Euro Burial? Tuesday, 11 May 2010 | 10:41 AM ET
    european_union_200.jpg

    What the European leaders really meant to do with their big-bang, trillion-dollar sovereign-debt rescue was to save the euro currency, not to bury it. But with the cave in by European Central Bank head Jean-Claude Trichet (formerly a hard-money man and closet gold watcher) to use the "nuclear option" to buy up dubious sovereign debt, the euro is likely to keep depreciating.

  • Why Are Europe's CEOs So Miserable? Tuesday, 11 May 2010 | 9:12 AM ET
    The European Debt Crisis - See Complete Coverage

    If the support package put smiles back on the faces of the politicians, it did little to lift the mood of the business people gathered at the WEF meeting in Brussels.

  • What the Euro Rescue Means for Investors Monday, 10 May 2010 | 4:53 PM ET
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    The unprecedented action by European politicians and bankers has led to a massive sigh of relief from investors, because the ECB is promising to buy European government debt—in the open market—for the first time ever.

  • Global Markets Rebound Sharply Monday, 10 May 2010 | 3:43 PM ET

    Recall that many global markets and several sectors hit highs in April - before accumulating losses through Friday's trading.

  • Farr: Trillion Dollar Bail-Out, Here We Go Again! Monday, 10 May 2010 | 10:55 AM ET
    The European Debt Crisis - See Complete Coverage

    The expected surge in share prices this morning is accompanied by sighs of relief and breathless anticipation of new highs. THIS IS NOT RESILIENCE! This is the effect of a trillion dollar injection. It represents new debt and commitments to support governments that have not lived within their means.

  • EU Bailout a 'Double-Edged Sword ': Strategist Monday, 10 May 2010 | 5:20 AM ET

    The EU's 500 billion-euro crisis fund will provide 'immediate relief'; however, austerity measures attached to the bailout will harm the growth prospects of the Eurozone, said Beat Lenherr, chief global strategist at LGT Capital Management.

  • Yoshikami: Thursday's Plunge – Your Wake-up Call Friday, 7 May 2010 | 10:55 AM ET
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    It was pretty wild out there. But instead of chalking this up as simply panic in the market, we should see it as a huge wake up call. All is not well.