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Europe Top News and Analysis France

  • Nouriel Roubini

    The rally in gold prices is developing into a bubble and the precious metal faces "significant risks of a downward correction," Nouriel Roubini, chairman of RGE Monitor, said in a research note, the Financial Times reported Wednesday.

  • The renewed rivalry between France and the UK is still growing. And this time agriculture is the altercation.

  • mohamed el-erian

    Dubai's debt woes may serve as a catalyst for a correction in stock markets but it does not signal a new crisis, investment manager Mohammed El-Erian told CNBC.

  • Strauss-Kahn.jpg

    The crisis is not over as unemployment is likely to continue rising for the next 10 to 11 months, Dominique Strauss-Kahn, managing director of the IMF, told CNBC Thursday.

  • The value of gold and silver are on the rise, but this spells trouble for the declining dollar index which could push as low as 66 points, according to Chris Zwermann, strategist from Zwermann Financial.

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  • Recession-themed newsprint cuttings

    The world will slump into a depression similar to that in the 1930s if stimulus measures are pulled out too soon, an economist warned. But investors have a chance to make good money in stock markets, a strategist said.

  • European Central Bank President Jean-Claude Trichet

    ECB chief Jean-Claude Trichet discussed exchange rates with euro zone finance ministers on Monday but said nothing new on a dollar slide that some fear could hurt Europe's economic recovery.

  • Do you remember that very strong European Competition czar who battled Microsoft and Intel, accusing them of anti-competitive behavior? The question now is: will she be strong enough to battle Germany’s Angela Merkel?

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    Stocks and gold are crowded markets and there is a risk that everybody will want to exit at the same time, Hugh Hendry, chief investment officer at Eclectica, told CNBC Friday.

  • President Nicolas Sarkozy's 23-year-old son and fellow conservatives are defending his bid for a highly visible job overseeing France's biggest business district.

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    Australia's rate hike may not signal a stampede to raise rates. But smaller central banks could be tempted to tighten sooner rather than later.

  • McDonald's Meal

    Three new stories may offer hope for the class warfare that has run roughshod over our national psyche of late: a Cadbury descendant called Kraft that "American plastic cheese company", Michael Moore's "Capitalism" movie flopped, and the Louvre is opening a McDonald's.

  • Nouriel Roubini

    High unemployment and a lack of stimulus for private demand by countries like Japan and Germany could slow down the world recovery, famous bear Nouriel Roubini, chairman of RGE Monitor, told CNBC Monday.

  • Former French President Jacques Chirac sent his dog to a farm in the French countryside after it was unable to cope with life after the presidential palace, according to media reports.

  • Munich is the most attractive European city for real estate investment judging by the level of demand, surpassing London and Paris, due to its diversified economy and growing population, according to a report by LaSalle Investment Management.

  • What's Next?

    The crisis the world went through is just an appetizer for a future one because the weaknesses that created it have not been addressed, Marc Faber, author and publisher of the Gloom, Doom and Boom Report, told CNBC Friday.

  • London and New York still hold the top spots as the world’s most competitive financial centers, but the economic crisis has seen Asian cities such as Hong Kong and Singapore surge up the rankings, according to the Global Financial Centres Index.

  • Asian economic growth is becoming increasingly driven by international consumers and this will eventually make the Asian market much more profitable than the West, according to Puru Saxena from Puru Saxena Wealth Management.

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.

    The Federal Reserve is preparing regulation that would see it veto banks' compensation policies if it believes they encourage bank employees to take too much risk, the Wall Street Journal reported Friday.