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  • Don't fret over Japan's less-than-stellar GDP: Pro

    Despite weaker-than-expected fourth-quarter growth, Japan is seeing signs of wage increases and higher household income, says Alexander Treves, head of Equities, Japan, at Fidelity Worldwide Investment.

  • Japan is 'out of technical recession': S&P

    While growth in the fourth-quarter was softer-than-expected, it showed that Japan is headed in the right direction, says Paul Gruenwald, Chief Economist for Asia Pacific at Standard and Poor's Ratings Services.

  • This week, all eyes on the euro and yen

    Jeffrey Halley, senior manager for FX Trading at Saxo Capital Markets and Richard Harris, CEO of Port Shelter Investment Management, discuss the outlook of the euro and Japanese yen this week.

  • Big week ahead in Asia

    Ahead of the Lunar New Year holiday on Thursday, markets will be on the lookout for Japan's fourth-quarter GDP, alongside China's property data and a slew of central bank decisions.

  • Europe ends higher as GDP beats; DAX hits all-time high

    European equities closed higher on Friday with investor sentiment boosted by better-than-expected growth numbers out of the euro zone and the prospect of a cease-fire deal between Ukraine and Russia.

  • Dixon: Euro GDP is positive, but I'm skeptical

    Euro zone GDP data has boosted by 0.3 percent. Peter Dixon, economist at Commerzbank, says that Germany's GDP data has given the euro zone data "a real lift," however "I'm skeptical" on whether it can be sustained.

  • Pernod CFO: China slowly improving

    How will Pernod Ricard address the China slowdown? Gilles Bogaert, CFO of Pernod Ricard, says things are gradually improving, while adding how they hope to address this for the better.

  • Malaysia slowdown likely to continue: Expert

    Krystal Tan, economist at Capital Economics, expects Malaysia's growth in 2015 to be around 5 percent, down from almost 6 percent last year.

  • '2015 won't be easy for Malaysia': CIMB

    Song Seng Wun, regional economist at CIMB, says Malaysia's outlook for the year will depend on whether commodity prices and external demand see meaningful rebounds.

  • 'Boring' key to what investors want: Pro

    Alison Deans, CRT Capital CIO, and Christopher Wolfe, Merrill Lynch Wealth Management, share perspective on market turbulence and the best way to navigate risks.

  • What happens if Fed raises rates

    Deutsche Bank's David Bianco, and Jason Trennert, Strategas Research Partners, share their outlook on the markets, earnings and the strong U.S. dollar.

  • Downward revisions to GDP estimates

    CNBC's Steve Liesman is tracking Q4 and Q1 GDP estimates.

  • Indonesia 2014 GDP seen around 5%

    Indonesian growth likely slowed last year but going forward, Jokowi's economic measures are expected to boost growth, says Wellian Wiranto, Economist at OCBC Bank.

  • Is China's slowdown here to stay?

    Charlie Diebel, head of macro strategy at Aviva Investors, says that despite data underlining China's slowdown, the country is doing a "good job" at controlling it.

  • Commuters at Canary Wharf underground tube station

    There was good news for U.K. businesses on Monday, after an influential economic group said a long-awaited uptick in lending would start this year.

  • US markets: Shake shack, China & US jobs

    Alan Knuckman, chief options strategist at Bulls-Eye Options, discusses U.S. markets, including Shake Shack's IPO, global GDP data, China PMI data and the upcoming jobs report.

  •  Beijing will stick to targeted easing: StanChart

    Monday's PMI data is in line with the ongoing narrative of slowing growth in China so authorities will stick to the script of targeted easing, says Clive McDonnell, Head of Equity Strategy at Standard Chartered.

  • FX markets seeing 'risks of disappointment': Pro

    Robert Rennie, Global Head of FX Strategy at Westpac Bank, discusses how data over the weekend, namely lower-than-expected U.S. GDP and Chinese factory activity, are impacting global currencies.

  • Russia's economy ministry said on Saturday it expected gross domestic product to fall 3 percent this year, more optimistic than many analysts' forecasts of a 4-5 percent drop.

  • Federal Reserve Board Chairwoman Janet Yellen speaks in Washington.

    Two market strategists stick to Fed rate hike this year.