Politics George W. Bush

  • National party conventions are known as much for their nonstop partying as they are for their politics — a time for lobbyists, politicians and corporate executives to gather at lavish receptions and elegant dinners.

  • obama_supporters_young_1.jpg

    Television networks are assigning reporters to a new beat this election year: people who don’t watch the evening news. With polls showing a surge in primary-season ballots cast by voters under 30, media outlets are out to convert the newly energized voters into viewers.

  • As Sen. John McCain and the GOP leadership nationalize the drill, drill, drill message, the Republican party might conceivably be riding a summer political rally. The question of offshore drilling has suddenly become the biggest political and economic wedge issue of this election.

  • fannie_mae_logo.jpg

    Fannie Mae, the largest provider of funding for U.S. residential mortgages, on Wednesday said it grew its investment portfolio in June at the fastest annualized rate in nearly five years.

  • fannie_freddie_logos3.jpg

    Rescue legislation sailed through the House Wednesday aimed at helping 400,000 homeowners avoid foreclosure and to prevent Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac from collapsing.

  • Congress looks set to pass a housing rescue bill that will backstop Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, create tougher oversight of the mortgage finance giants and spend billions to prevent home foreclosures.

  • Can bad Washington policies sometimes work to the benefit of financial markets? In the short run the answer is certainly yes. Nothing illustrates this point better than the gigantic Fannie-Freddie housing bailout bill that will soon pass Congress and be signed into law by President Bush.

  • congress.jpg

    In a vote of no confidence in the housing market, President Bush this morning revoked his threat to veto the housing rescue bill, which is making its way to a vote on the House floor today.

  • fannie_freddie_logos3.jpg

    Shares of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac surged after President Bush dropped opposition to a housing rescue bill, which would offer a lifeline to the mortgage giants.

  • Many economists have concluded that a second dose of government stimulus spending is required to prevent a broad economic unraveling and provide relief to millions of Americans grappling with joblessness, plunging home prices and tight credit.

  • In a dramatic move yesterday President Bush removed the executive-branch moratorium on offshore drilling. Today, at a news conference, Bush repeated his new position, and slammed the Democratic Congress for not removing the congressional moratorium on the Outer Continental Shelf and elsewhere.

  • bush_george_president_1.jpg

    President Bush urged lawmakers to move quickly in putting into force legislation designed to help prop up mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac while declaring the nation's financial system to be "basically sound."

  • oil_rigs_3.jpg

    Congress should follow President Bush’s lead in opening up the outer continental shelf to oil and gas exploration and seek other non-partisan solutions to fulfill the nation’s glowingly urgent energy needs, says John Hoffmeister. the former head of Shell Oil's US operations.

  • oil_rig.jpg

    Putting pressure on congressional Democrats to back more exploration for oil, President Bush on Monday lifted an executive ban on offshore drilling that has stood since his father was president.

  • Dollars and Euro

    The almighty dollar is mighty no more. It has been declining steadily for six years against other major currencies, undercutting its role as the leading international banking currency. The long slide is fanning inflation at home and playing a major role in the run-up of oil and gasoline prices everywhere.

  • U.S. President George W. Bush said on Sunday the American economy was not growing as quickly as he would like and that his administration supported a strong U.S. dollar policy.

  • congress.jpg

    Democrats in Congress are gearing up to pass a second election-year economic stimulus package, but unlike the $152 billion measure that passed in February, they are not counting on getting the support of President Bush.

  • President George W. Bush was strong and in good spirits as he met this morning with a small group of journalists for about 90 minutes in the Oval Office. Topics across the board were discussed.

  • Tony Crescenzi

    In light of the immense strain that higher energy costs are imposing on the American people and threats to America posed by its dependence on foreign oil, there is no better time than now for President Bush to rally the nation into taking actions that result in an immediate and substantive impact on energy demand and hence energy prices.

  • President Bush praised Congress Friday for moving forward on a bill giving permitting government eavesdropping in the war on terrorism, saying "it will help our intelligence professionals learn enemies' plans for new attacks."