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  • BCBS chairman Nout Wellink talks with BCBS secretary general Stefan Walter

    European regulators should stop banker-bashing and allow banks to do their job or risk losing ground to competition from the US, Middle East and Asia in the financial sector, Howard Wheeldon, senior strategist at BGC Partners, told CNBC.com.

  • Anti-Gaddafi rebel runs away as smoke rises following an air strike by Libyan warplanes.

    Fears that the world economy is facing another downturn are being overplayed, despite the political upheaval caused by recent unrest in the Middle East and the earthquake and subsequent tsunami in Japan, Jim O'Neill, chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management, said.

  • An RAF Tornado GR4 aircraft is prepared for launch, the first UK air combat mission in support of UN Resolution 1973, at RAF Marham on March 19, 2011 in Norfolk, England.

    Analysts are warning that the decision of the BRIC nations not to support the no-fly zone in Libya is an indication that in years to come Gaddafi-like dictators will find it easier to wage war on their people without external intervention.

  • CNBC - Ctia Wireless 2011- The Wireless Connection

    The $20 billion bridge loan JP Morgan provided to AT&T in order to help cement its planned purchase of Deutsche Telekom’s T-Mobile USA unit is the largest commitment the bank has ever made to a client, according to people at the firm.

  • Visitors lay down flowers and condolence messages at Knut's enclosure at the Berlin Zoo on March 20, 2011 in Berlin, Germany.

    Hundreds of fans of Knut the polar bear flocked to his zoo enclosure Sunday to mourn the sudden death of the celebrity who burst into the limelight as a cuddly, fluffy cub hand-fed by his keeper.

  • shaking_hands_3_200.jpg

    German telecoms giant Deutsche Telekom has agreed to sell mobile network operator T-Mobile USA to AT&T for $39 billion, paving the way for a partial exit from a market which had turned into a headache for the Bonn-based group.

  • A Rescue worker wipes his forehead after carrying a body from the rubble of a village destroyed by the devastating earthquake March 16, 2011 in Kesennuma, Miyagi province, Japan.

    The world economy is still very fragile and the impact of the Japanese earthquake and the nuclear crisis is distressing, Stephen Roach, non-executive chairman at Morgan Stanley, Asia, told CNBC in an interview.

  • EU building flags brussels

    Jean Monnet, the father of European integration, once remarked that “Europe will be forged in crises, and will be the sum of the solutions adopted in crises.”

  • Euro bills and coins

    Did euro area policymakers finally pull a real live rabbit out of the hat? The headlines from Friday's summit are certainly impressive, advancing much quicker than expected and delivering the surprise of allowing the EFSF to intervene in the primary debt markets.

  • "I think this whole thing is a Ponzi scheme in which governments that are already in deep red ink are trying to generate more red ink," Niall Ferguson, history professor at Harvard University, told CNBC.

  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel

    Markets have cheered a surprisingly broad European package of measures to tackle the government debt crisis that has over the past year threatened the existence of the euro currency.

  • eu building brussels

    Friday night’s deal in Brussels was only made possible by sovereign downgrades and skyrocketing bond yields that still have the potential to push the periphery countries over the edge.

  • shaking_hands_3_200.jpg

    Euro zone leaders have agreed to coordinate their economic policies more closely — more or less. 

  • baby_steps_200.jpg

    Debt crisis? What debt crisis? The EU leaders want to work on their competitiveness pact at their March 11 meetup. Expect the euro to continue slipping.

  • Wealthy Saudi investor Prince Alwaleed bin Talal expressed confidence in Citigroup's earnings potential and also called for the bank to issue a dividend to shareholders.

  • If the European Central Bank raises rates, people will wonder whether the central bank is taking the position of country's facing debt problems into account, John Bruton, former Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister) told CNBC Wednesday.

  • Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi

    Switzerland has also moved to freeze the assets of the Libyan regime. But it seems unlikely that Colonel Gaddafi and his cronies would be stashing their wealth in Zurich these days.

  • Traders tell me stock markets are down in Europe today over fears about how its world class exporters could be hit by rising oil prices, specifically in emerging markets.

  • Protests in Libya
  • Euro bills

    Traders point to the fact that there is no sign that Europe’s credit markets are beginning to seize up as they did last spring, with banks worrying about each other’s counter-party risk. That’s evident from the fact that there is no spike in LIBOR, the interest rate at which banks borrow unsecured cash from each other on London's wholesale market.