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  • There are two known dates and one unknown date that will cause volatility and uncertainty surrounding the Euro. All three will likely occur in the next three weeks.

  • The Parthenon in Greece

    The bailout of Greece has stirred ferocious debate and fallout in Germany, which has an election shortly.

  • Nouriel Roubini

    The sovereign debt crisis will get worse and bond vigilantes could move on to even bigger economies like the United States and Japan when they are done sweeping through vulnerable European nations, according to economist Nouriel Roubini.

  • Euro bills

    The man who is likely to succeed Jean-Claude Trichet as the President of the European Central Bank told CNBC that the Greek bailout will be implemented soon and dismissed the idea that the euro zone is at risk of falling apart.

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    There is no evidence of contagion from the Greek debt debacle to other markets, but the country's woes will help push the euro down, boosting exports for some countries in the single European currency area, David Bloom, global head of foreign exchange research at HSBC, told CNBC Monday.

  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel

    The German language has been "enriched" by a new word that might well make it into international dictionaries: Sich durchmerkeln.

  • Close-up of a pen on stock price chart

    Greece gave in to market pressure and officially requested financial aid from the European Union and the International Monetary Fund Friday, but analysts and traders say the rollercoaster ride for investors is not over.

  • With Greek debt continuing to soar at record levels, there is growing concern in some European markets that they too will soon face the same problems.

  • FT3.jpg

    “Stockholm syndrome” – in which captives become sympathetic to their captors – is to blame for the “extremely limited” efforts at improved regulation seen since the financial crisis, the FT reports.

  • Goldman Sachs

    Financial markets are all about anticipating what happens next, not about what is right and wrong or fair or justified. And right now, financial markets might just decide to do to the bankers of Goldman Sachs what they have done to the likes of Greece for these past months.

  • windmills_154x116.jpg

    From cutting-edge technology to ancient ingenuity, take our quiz to find out how much you know about alternative energy.

  • The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission seal hangs on the facade of its building in Washington, DC.

    The Securities and Exchange Commission's (SEC) charge of fraud against Goldman comes at a bad time for the company but it is unlikely to spell the end of Wall Street's most famous investment bank, Dennis Gartman, author of the Gartman Letter, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • Government lawyers are facing many potential pitfalls as they attempt to prove the civil fraud charges against Goldman Sachs.

  • European Commission President Jose-Manuel Barroso on Sunday called for Europe to co-ordinate any steps to address the economic impact of Icelandic Volcano which has grounded flights across the continent.

  • Investors looking to benefit from emerging market growth should buy German export stocks, Matthias Born, portfolio manager at Allianz Global Investors, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • Investors are underestimating the strength of the German and French economies, which will return to strong growth in the second and third quarters on the back of export and investment strength, Bob Parker, an analyst with Credit Suisse, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • The Parthenon in Greece

    Over the weekend, the EU and IMF announced a support package for Greece that appeared initially to mollify German constitutional concerns.

  • The next 24 hours will be critical for Greece and its economy. After news over the weekend that the euro zone put together a rescue package, Athens will now test the markets reaction.

  • Before we blame Greenspan for the past bubble and bust, it is worth reiterating that of course there was a lot of blame to go around in this area.

  • UBS

    Swiss banking giant UBS said Monday its pre-tax profit will be at least 2.5 billion Swiss Francs ($2.33 billion) in the first quarter, when outflows of funds continued.