Europe Top News and Analysis Germany

  • Oil Barrels

    Oil prices are heading back towards the $80 - $100 a barrel sweet spot which will boost oil stocks and take pressure off the global economy, according to Jens Zimmermann, a senior equity analyst at ABN AMRO Private Banking in Zurich.

  • European shares were expected to fall on Tuesday after gaining for eight straight sessions, with a drop in commodity prices seen hurting mining and energy stocks.

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    European stock markets were indicated to open higher after news that Al Qaeda's leader Osama bin Laden was killed in Pakistan.

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    Germany ends work restrictions on some citizens from the new, former communist European Union members torn between fears of a wave of immigration and hopes for help in its booming construction sector.

  • The Dow Jones has tended to stay rather flat on the seven previous occasions when there have been royal weddings, Chris Zwermann’s, global strategist at Zwermann Financial, told CNBC Friday.

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    Economic growth is not taking hold and current policy is insufficient, Moorad Choudhry, Head of Business Treasury, Global Banking & Markets at the Royal Bank of Scotland writes.

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    European stocks were indicated to open mixed Friday in think volume, with London Stock Exchange closed for a bank holiday celebrating the Royal Wedding.

  • What's Next?

    The headwinds facing the global economy, while significant, have yet to impact stock markets as investors have focused on rising profitability and the "risk-on" trade being underpinned by loose monetary policy.

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    When Europe’s political elite created the single currency in the 1990s the chances of an Italian running the newly-formed European Central Bank would have been seen as very low.

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    Financial bookmakers expect the leading European benchmark indexes to rally on Thursday, tracking gains on Wall Street after the Fed signaled it would not raise rates.

  • Lehman Brothers

    The specter of Lehman Brothers continues to haunt policymakers. Nowhere is its presence more apparent than the euro zone, where twin banking and sovereign debt crises are raging, reports the FT.

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    It's Fed-watch time for dollar traders, and it's Germany time for investors awaiting a decision on European Central Bank leadership. Time for your FX Fix.

  • Car Manufacturing

    High production costs and supply constraints caused by the Japanese Earthquake could slow any nascent revival in UK manufacturing, according to the Confederation of British Industries.

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    As we await Ben Bernanke’s first ever press conference this afternoon, the debate over whether the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) should extend unconventional measures rages on.

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    European stocks were set for a mixed open Wednesday, with Germany’s Dax indicated to open higher, while London’s FTSE and the Paris Cac-40 were on course for a slightly lower open.

  • Goldman Sachs

    With Mario Draghi, Italy’s central bank chief, looking almost certain to become its next president, the European Central Bank is set for a significant change of style – but not necessarily in strategic direction, the FT reports.

  • The Parthenon in Greece

    With opposition to the bailouts of Greece, Ireland and now Portugal rising fast in the euro zone’s prosperous north, one analyst warns Greece to get on with restructuring its debt.

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    European shares were set to slip on Tuesday, tracking falls on Wall Street and in Asia as investors take a cautious stance ahead of the start of the latest Federal Reserve meeting.

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    The won is wafting close to new highs, but the greenback still has the blues. Time for your Earth Day FX Fix.

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    Widespread expectations of a Greek debt deal are clouding the outlook for the euro. But it might not be as painful as some investors think.