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Europe Top News and Analysis Germany

  • Share Price chart

    European shares were set to dip on Friday, reversing gains from the previous session to mirror a weak session in Asian equities, as some worries about the pace of global growth continued to weigh on investor sentiment.

  • Real Madrid coach Jose Mourinho

    Keeping costs under control remains the biggest challenge to European soccer clubs, with wage-to-revenue ratios worsening in 2009/2010 despite overall revenue increases, according to new research from Deloitte.

  • 2008 Mini Cooper hardtop

    BMW will invest 500 million pounds ($818 million) in its UK factories as it prepares its manufacturing network for the rollout of its next-generation Mini.

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    CNBC's Silvia Wadhwa Says: Why Not Print Your Own Money?

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    The European Union must save Greece and private bondholders have already begun to price in taking part in future efforts to bail out the indebted country, Herbert Stepic, Raiffeisen Bank International CEO, told CNBC.com.

  • Punkaharju, FINLAND: Iceland's Prime Minister Geir H. Haarde waves to photographers after steering a timber tractor during the Nordic premiers meeting in Punkaharju, 19 June 2007. The Nordic Prime Ministers meet in Punkaharju to discuss current topics on the United Nations and the European Union. AFP PHOTO LEHTIKUVA / Pekka Sakki *** FINLAND OUT *** (Photo credit should read PEKKA SAKKI/AFP/Getty Images)

    Geir Haarde, Iceland's former prime minister, has been charged with criminal negligence over his part in the collapse of the country's banking sector in 2008, the first credible attempt to hold a head of government accountable for the failures in oversight that led to the global financial crisis.

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    Economic data on both sides of the Atlantic pointing to a slowdown is rattling investors' nerves and is likely to keep them on the sidelines for the rest of the month, Barclays Capital expects.

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    Dominique Strauss-Kahn, naturally, isn't attending this year, and his likely successor Christine Lagarde is in China, but the Bilderberg Conference, which kicks off in the Swiss resort of St. Moritz on Thursday, retains its conspiratorial chic and pulling power.

  • Budapest, Hungary

    As its European neighbours continue to struggle, Hungary, which turned down part of an International Monetary Fund/European Union loan last year, has won grudging international acceptance for its focus on job creation.

  • Share Price chart

    European stock index futures pointed to a lower open on Thursday, with shares poised to lose ground for the seventh straight session as worries on the outlook for the global economy continue to rattle investors.

  • European Central Bank

    Whilst the Bank of England sits on the sidelines, the boss of the European Central Bank on Thursday is expected to signal he will raise rates next month to curb inflationary pressures.

  • European Central Bank

    The European Central Bank looks set to keep its benchmark interest rate stable at 1.25 percent at its June 9 meeting, analysts told CNBC.com. Policymakers will remain "strongly vigilant" on inflation and global growth concerns, meaning that a rate rise in July looks likely.

  • A local woman votes in the presidential election in the village of Kazakhstan, some 80 kms from Almaty on April 3, 2011. Kazakhstan votes on April 3 in a mostly ceremonial election that is set to stretch President Nurusltan Nazarbayev's rule into a third decade amid Western worries about democracy in the resource-rich state. AFP PHOTO / Vyacheslav Oseledko (Photo credit should read VYACHESLAV OSELEDKO/AFP/Getty Images)

    BT will forge partnerships with telecom operators in countries in Central Asia to boost its presence there but will not buy companies in the region, BT Group Chairman Sir Michael Rake told CNBC.com on Wednesday.

  • Exhaust plumes from cooling towers are seen at the Jaenschwalde lignite coal-fired power station in Janschwalde, Germany.

    European gas suppliers could see a boost from Germany's decision to phase out nuclear energy, with other countries set to follow Berlin's lead, Per Lekander, head of utilities research at UBS, told CNBC Wednesday.

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    What is one to make of recent economic data, particularly in the advanced countries? Is the world economy slowing? If so, should policy do anything about it and, if so, what might the alternatives be? The FT reports.

  • Employees of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant walk outside of the destroyed 4th block of the plant on February 24, 2011 ahead of the 25th anniversary of the meltdown of reactor number four due to be marked on April 26, 2011. Ukraine said early this year it will lift restrictions on tourism around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, formally opening the scene of the world's worst nuclear accident to visitors. Chernobyl's number-four reactor, in what was then the Soviet Union and now Ukraine, expl

    Nuclear safety watchdogs and G20 energy ministers gathering in Paris on Tuesday and Wednesday to work on reinforcing nuclear safety around the globe in the wake of the Japanese nuclear disaster at Fukushima last March were keen to stress nuclear energy is still a viable source of alternative energy.

  • Gold Bars

    Gold is the market's 'friend with benefits', and investors would do well to park their cash in the precious metal whilst stocks attempt to find levels more appropriate to the recent economic weakness, according to Nicholas Colas, the chief market strategist at ConvergEx.

  • Austria

    Talk about a possible default by Greece has caused some concern for SAP in Central and Eastern Europe but it is not changing the company's plans, Manfred Joseph, managing director at SAP CEE, told CNBC.com.

  • The US economy could be facing a so-called Operation Twist rather than a third round of quantitative easing (QE3), a leading economist told CNBC Wednesday.

  • Fed Chief Ben Bernanke Testifies to House Budget Committee

    There was no guidance on the end of the second round of quantitative easing or QE2 and no guidance on the chance of QE3, but Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke on Tuesday confirmed market expectations that the United States' borrowing costs will remain low for the foreseeable future.