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  • New car sales in Europe were slightly down in September and virtually flat over the nine months, data showed on Tuesday, as consumers remained cautious despite low interest rates amid a paucity of new car models.

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    European aircraft maker Airbus delivered its first long-awaited A380 to Singapore Airlines Monday, finally giving parent EADS some good news to trumpet after two years of delays in delivering the world’s largest passenger aircraft and recent allegations of insider trading at the company.

  • Better-than-expected earnings from mobile-phone company Sony Ericsson boosted telecommunications stocks in Europe and added to a firm close for the major indexes Monday.

  • Suedzucker raised its guidance for its current 2007/2008 financial year on Thursday after forecast-beating sales and earnings results in the second quarter.

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    European Central Bank President Jean-Claude Trichet signaled the bank was still biased towards a rate hike, despite calls for action to curb the euro's rise against the dollar.

  • A sprinkling of deal news, sinking oil prices and a firmer dollar are in the background as stocks edge higher Tuesday. The big news for markets though will come in the Federal Reserve's meeting minutes, set for release at 2 p.m. ET. The minutes of the September 18 meeting and the August 16 call will be released. Traders are watching for hints of what made the Fed take the aggressive step to slash the Fed funds rate by a half point, greater than the 1/4 point widely expected.

  • European Union finance ministers agreed on Tuesday to review a slew of financial rules in the light of the summer's credit squeeze that tipped securities markets into turmoil.

  • Munich Re, the world's second-biggest reinsurer, is in talks to buy a majority of a South Korean online auto insurance unit from Daum Communications, the country's top Internet portal said on Tuesday.

  • The Fed and the start of earnings season are two big focuses for stocks Tuesday, after Monday's dullish session. The Fed releases minutes of its September 18 meeting and its August 16 call at 2p ET. This time last week, traders would have been digging into those minutes to find any confirmation of their view that rates will be cut again at the Fed's October 31 meeting.

  • Shares of SAP, the world's leading business software maker, tumbled Monday on the news that it would buy Franco-American company Business Objects, as investors feared the price of the transaction was too high.

  • Germany's finance minister appeared on Monday to dash prospects of a common response by euro zone nations to the single European currency's rising exchange rate, declaring "I love a strong euro."

  • The world's top banking supervisors gathered on Monday to review remedies to a crisis that has seen a major disruption of the global financial system and risks to global growth.

  • Euro-zone businesses and households can expect access to bank loans to be tougher in the months to come as banks batten down the hatches in the wake of the credit market turmoil.

  • Inflation pressures in the euro zone rose to a seven-year high in August and remain in an upward trend, a report said on Friday.

  • The European Central Bank and the Bank of England held rates steady, with policymakers still gauging the full extent of the impact of the global liquidity squeeze.

  • Excessive foreign exchange volatility is potentially damaging to the global economy, European Central Bank President Jean-Claude Trichet said on Thursday.

  • ICAP, the world's biggest inter-dealer broker, said on Thursday it expected annual underlying profit to be at the upper end of analysts' forecasts, with recent market volatility helping to boost trading volumes.

  • Just as Airbus hoped to start selling its oft-delayed superjumbo as a success story, a report of "massive insider trading" at parent company EADS leaked to the media -- raising the question of whether the beleaguered company can ever get ahead of its problems.

  • The ill-fated merger of Daimler-Benz and Chrysler in 1998 will officially fade into history's rear-view mirror on Thursday if shareholders approve changing the German carmaker's name to just Daimler.

  • The European Central Bank should leave interest rates on hold for now but consider cutting them if the economy worsens, Belgian Finance Minister Didier Reynders told a French newspaper in an interview published on Wednesday.