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Europe Top News and Analysis Germany

  • An octopus named Paul sits on a box decorated with a Spanish flag and a shell inside on July 9, 2010 at the Sea Life aquarium in Oberhausen, western Germany. Paul's task is to decide in favour of one of the shells hidden in boxes with the flags of the Netherlands and Spain to act thus as oracle for the upcoming final match of the FIFA Football World Cup between the two countries on July 11, 2010. Paul, the 'psychic' octopus, who had predicted well the result of six German matches earlier in the

    The world’s most famous octopus, which correctly predicted the winner of this year's World Cup, has died, the Oberhausen Sea Life Centre in Germany announced Tuesday in a statement.

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    A decaf latte with skim milk and artificial sweetener is called, in some places, a why bother. No caffeine, no fat, no sugar—why bother? It would be too much to say the meeting of the G20 finance ministers this past weekend was a complete why bother, but, in my eyes, close to it.

  • Close-up of a pen on stock price chart

    Asset allocation strategists haven’t had an easy time in recent years. For awhile they dished out bigger weightings to defensive plays—bonds, cash and commodities. But for 2011, strategists recommend investors boost allocations to ride the wave.

  • The dollar's slump could get far worse if the dollar index takes out last year's low, Robin Griffiths, technical strategist at Cazenove Capital, told CNBC Monday.

  • The government bond market rally is over and investors are switching their portfolios to the stock market, Royce Tostrams, technical analyst at Tostrams Groep, told CNBC Friday.

  • Nouriel Roubini

    The European Central Bank should worry less about the “phantom risk” of inflation and instead focus on the rising threat of deflation which could result from a currency war, economist Nouriel Roubini said in an article for Roubini Global Economics clients.

  • Jim Rogers

    The problems banks have with mortgages will take a long time to be solved and bank stocks are not attractive despite the recent drop in price following fears over problems with foreclosures, famous investor Jim Rogers told CNBC Wednesday.

  • The enthusiasm for Germany's economic growth is overdone and the country's savings plan is "fatal," Noriel Roubini, economist and chairman of Roubini Global Economics told a Germany magazine.

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    Vintage or antique timepieces can fetch extraordinary prices, but they better possess unique and still functional features, be in scarce supply, carry a distinguished brand name and be in near-mint condition.

  • The high prices and low yields of long-dated government bonds would only be worthwhile if the economy was in depression and investors should get out of the assets now, Robin Griffiths, technical strategist at Cazenove Capital, told CNBC Monday.

  • Greece

    As the government of Prime Minster George Papandreou struggles to get the nation’s financial house in order — reducing the size of its bloated civil service, chasing after tax evaders and overhauling its pension system — it has also begun to tackle a much less talked about problem: the cozy system of “closed professions” that has existed here for decades, costing the economy billions of dollars a year.

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    German companies have complained about state-owned Chinese rivals landing an increasing number of contracts in eastern Europe and central Asia by means of “price-dumping, aggressive financing and generous risk-guarantees” from Beijing.

  • The policy of easy money has created the current bull market for bonds, but investors should tread carefully ahead of the Federal Open Market Committee's meeting next month, Christian Gattiker, global investment strategist and head of research at Julius Baer, told CNBC Friday.

  • Expectations of a second round of asset-buying, or quantitative easing, implemented by the Federal Reserve are nothing but good news for the stock market, Simon Maughan, co-head of European equities at MF Global, told CNBC.

  • A small rise in inflation may trigger a correction for the bond market, as too many investors have piled in, Roman Scott, managing director at Calamander Capital, told CNBC Monday.

  • Euro bills in hand

    The euro will keep rising and will likely end the year at up to $1.50, as the European Central Bank pursues a highly deflationary policy, despite buying euro-denominated bonds, economist Warren Mosler, founder and principal of broker/dealer AVM, told CNBC.com.

  • The Dow Jones Industrial Average is unlikely to move much higher than its current level as a long-term "diamond" pattern is signalling weakness ahead, Chris Zwermann, global strategist at Zwermann Financial, told CNBC Wednesday.

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    The State Department travel alert issued on Sunday in response to reports of a threat by Al Qaeda was anything but precise.

  • Talk of a "death spiral" for the euro isn't taking the political will of euro-zone members and any breakup is unlikely, despite the talk of economists such as Nobel Laureate Joseph Stiglitz, Sean Corrigan, chief investment strategist for Diapason Commodities Management, told CNBC Monday.

  • Reichstag Parliment building, Berlin, Germany

    Europe faces an important challenge in creating greater awareness of the importance of a stable currency, but to achieve that goal, its citizens will need to grow more attached to the euro, Otmar Issing, former European Central Bank chief economist, told CNBC.