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Europe Top News and Analysis Germany

  • The enthusiasm for Germany's economic growth is overdone and the country's savings plan is "fatal," Noriel Roubini, economist and chairman of Roubini Global Economics told a Germany magazine.

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    Vintage or antique timepieces can fetch extraordinary prices, but they better possess unique and still functional features, be in scarce supply, carry a distinguished brand name and be in near-mint condition.

  • The high prices and low yields of long-dated government bonds would only be worthwhile if the economy was in depression and investors should get out of the assets now, Robin Griffiths, technical strategist at Cazenove Capital, told CNBC Monday.

  • Greece

    As the government of Prime Minster George Papandreou struggles to get the nation’s financial house in order — reducing the size of its bloated civil service, chasing after tax evaders and overhauling its pension system — it has also begun to tackle a much less talked about problem: the cozy system of “closed professions” that has existed here for decades, costing the economy billions of dollars a year.

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    German companies have complained about state-owned Chinese rivals landing an increasing number of contracts in eastern Europe and central Asia by means of “price-dumping, aggressive financing and generous risk-guarantees” from Beijing.

  • The policy of easy money has created the current bull market for bonds, but investors should tread carefully ahead of the Federal Open Market Committee's meeting next month, Christian Gattiker, global investment strategist and head of research at Julius Baer, told CNBC Friday.

  • Expectations of a second round of asset-buying, or quantitative easing, implemented by the Federal Reserve are nothing but good news for the stock market, Simon Maughan, co-head of European equities at MF Global, told CNBC.

  • A small rise in inflation may trigger a correction for the bond market, as too many investors have piled in, Roman Scott, managing director at Calamander Capital, told CNBC Monday.

  • Euro bills in hand

    The euro will keep rising and will likely end the year at up to $1.50, as the European Central Bank pursues a highly deflationary policy, despite buying euro-denominated bonds, economist Warren Mosler, founder and principal of broker/dealer AVM, told CNBC.com.

  • The Dow Jones Industrial Average is unlikely to move much higher than its current level as a long-term "diamond" pattern is signalling weakness ahead, Chris Zwermann, global strategist at Zwermann Financial, told CNBC Wednesday.

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    The State Department travel alert issued on Sunday in response to reports of a threat by Al Qaeda was anything but precise.

  • Talk of a "death spiral" for the euro isn't taking the political will of euro-zone members and any breakup is unlikely, despite the talk of economists such as Nobel Laureate Joseph Stiglitz, Sean Corrigan, chief investment strategist for Diapason Commodities Management, told CNBC Monday.

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    Europe faces an important challenge in creating greater awareness of the importance of a stable currency, but to achieve that goal, its citizens will need to grow more attached to the euro, Otmar Issing, former European Central Bank chief economist, told CNBC.

  • Investors expect Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke to print more money as the growth rate remains too low, and this is the reason behind the very strong rally in September, Philippe Gijsels, a strategist with BNP Paribas Fortis, told CNBC.com Friday.

  • If a global double dip happens, the downside on corporate junk is much more daunting than it is for sovereign debt.

  • The sovereign debt crisis, wrecking havoc on some periphery euro zone member states, could turn out to be a positive for many core European counties, Karen Olney, chief European equity strategist at UBS, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • New EU banking regulation must focus on institutions’ individual business models, rather than simply their size, Jacques de Larosière, co-president of think tank Eurofi told CNBC.

  • Stocks closed higher for a fourth straight week Friday, extending a September rally with huge daily gains fueled by optimism over the future direction of the economy  Caterpillar and Alcoa rose, Oracle fell.

  • Stocks were on track to end significantly higher Friday and for the fourth straight week as traders began to gain more confidence in the future health of the economy.  Caterpillar and Alcoa rose, Oracle fell.

  • Stocks continued to surge Friday morning after a boost in durable goods orders and news that the rate of sales of new homes was unchanged from July.  Caterpillar and Alcoa rose.