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Europe Top News and Analysis Germany

  • The government takeover of mortgage finance companies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac shows the need for more government intervention in the financial sector, French Finance Minister Christine Lagarde told CNBC Europe in an interview.

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    Even if the European Central Bank holds rates on Thursday the euro's supremacy on the currency markets is close to an end, analysts said on Wednesday.

  • The European Central Bank looks set to leave rates on hold on Thursday but the move is unlikely to contribute to a strengthening of the euro, as the signs of weakness in the euro zone economy intensify.  Vote on which currency will gain the most by the end of the year.

  • If the decline in Commerzbank's share price this morning tells us anything about investor sentiment towards the $14.5 billion deal to combine Commerzbank and Desdner, the market thinks they overpaid.

  • European shares were expected to fall on Monday, tracking losses in U.S. and Asian stocks as Dell's warning on corporate technology spending continued to hit tech stocks while investors fretted about the impact of Hurricane Gustav.

  • European shares are set to open slightly higher on Friday, extending the previous session's sharp gains, after a big upward revision in U.S. second quarter growth, but oil prices rose on supply concerns.

  • Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel topped Forbes magazine's list of the world's 100 most powerful women for the third year running, while U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice slipped to seventh from fourth last year.

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    Governments across the world are grappling with how to boost dwindling economic growth, designing rescue packages aimed at fending off recession. Which country do you think is doing the best job?

  • European equities were seen opening slightly lower on Monday, as investors turn cautious following a dip in the U.S. dollar versus the euro and with oil prices rising.

  • The financial crisis will probably not end until next year or even 2010, Germany's Handelsblatt newspaper quoted Morgan Stanley co-President Walid Chammah as saying in a preview of its Monday edition.

  • European equities were set to rise on Friday, tracking gains on Wall Street and in Asia, as a fall in commodity prices further eased concerns over consumer spending and inflation.

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    The euro zone economy recorded its first ever contraction in the second quarter, pulled down by falling activity in its biggest economies, which could lead to a technical recession.

  • European equities were seen gaining ground on Thursday, recovering after the previous session's sharp losses as rising commodity prices help support heavyweight mining and energy shares.

  • European financial groups ING and Zurich Financial Services reported quarterly profits that met or exceeded expectations on Wednesday, helped by strong insurance businesses and limited investment writedowns.

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    Neptune Orient Lines, which made a bid for German rival Hapag-Lloyd, warned its business will be much more difficult in the second half of 2008, as it posted a 19 percent fall in profit due to tough conditions and higher costs.

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    European aerospace group EADS said on Wednesday it was extending its Power8 restructuring at planemaker Airbus and measures to tackle a weak dollar as it posted weaker-than-expected second quarter profit.

  • SAP

    SAP posted solid second-quarter results despite global economic turmoil and gave an upbeat 2008 outlook, sending shares in the world's biggest business software maker more than 6 percent higher on Tuesday.

  • JetBlue's chief executive agreed to halve his salary on Monday in a show of solidarity with employees as the low-cost carrier struggles with soaring fuel prices and a slowing U.S. economy.

  • European stocks ended lower on Monday, dragged down by banks that fell on concerns over credit ratings at major U.S. mortgage lenders and by a rise in crude after recent sharp falls, which revived inflation worries.

  • German consumers have become more downbeat than at any time since the recession year of 2003 due to growing concerns about inflation and turmoil on financial markets, the GfK market research group said on Monday.