×

Europe News Germany

  • German memory-chip maker Qimonda declared bankruptcy Friday, just a month after receiving a rescue package of millions of euros (dollars) in loans.

  • Global stocks ended the week lower Friday on heightened economic fears. The dollar and government bonds gained as investors parked their money in safe havens.

  • Credit Crunch

    Well, I don't know about YOU, but 18 months into this subprime-crisis-turned-banking-crisis-turned-financial-crisis-turned-economic-crisis I am beginning to suffer from "crisis fatigue."

  • The yen rose toward a 13-1/2 year high against the dollar and a seven-year peak versus the euro on Thursday. While the sterling fell again against the greenback, nearing $1.3618, its lowest since September 1985.

  • Global stocks were down again Wednesday on continued signs of trouble in the financial sector. Experts tell CNBC that there is more bad news to come.

  • Obama_Barack_flag.jpg

    Barack Obama will become the 44th President of the United States on Tuesday. Ahead of Obama's inauguration, global stocks were mixed on investors' concerns about the economic difficulties confronting the incoming president. Experts on CNBC expect the dollar and U.S. stock market to fall on Obama's induction.

  • graphic_word_ofthe_street.jpg

    Considering the Dow and S&P are down in 2009, will the market bounce after the inauguration?

  • RBS_salesign_200.jpg

    The new bank bailouts are not likely to work because they are run by the same people who prolonged the economic agony, Marc Faber, publisher of the Gloom, Doom and Boom Report, told CNBC.

  • bank_crisis_europe_badge.jpg

    Like children at a funfair with a few quid in their pockets, Gordon Brown and Alistair Darling have dropped their latest coin (this one’s worth 100 billion pounds, or $146 billion) into the whack-a-mole game that is the UK financial market.

  • Global stocks were up Thursday after the U.S. said it would support Bank of America's purchase of Merrill Lynch with a $20 billion investment by the government and a promise to protect against losses on bad loans, removing a risk for investors. Experts highlight four perils that will dominate 2009.

  • The European Central Bank is widely expected to cut interest rates by 50 basis points Thursday, to a record low of 2 percent. But how low will the central bank go? Experts tell CNBC euro-zone rates could bottom at 0.5 percent.

  • bank_crisis_europe_badge.jpg

    The European Central Bank remains stuck to staff projections that the euro zone economy will shrink by just 0.5 percent this year while inflation slows to 1.4 percent and warns of a low-interest rate trap.

  • A day ahead of the European Central Bank's rate decision, more dismal data showed the euro zone needs monetary easing. But experts tell CNBC that central banks' interest-rate cuts have little impact on the economy in the current financial turmoil.

  • The euro remained under pressure Tuesday despite the German government approving a second stimulus package worth $64 billion to help Europe's largest economy.

  • merckle_adolf.jpg

    German town mourns businessman Adolf Merckle, who jumped in front of a train a day before it was announced that the company he had founded 34 years ago was being sold.

  • chart_scary.jpg

    Government bonds are still the safest bet for investors in these uncertain times, and the euro will face an uphill battle as weak economies will need more flexibility, Hugh Hendry, Chief Investment Officer and Partner at Eclectica, told CNBC.

  • There is a big chance that the Chinese economy will contract, as exports are falling because of the financial crisis that has gripped Western economies, Hugh Hendry, chief investment officer and partner at hedge fund Eclectica, told CNBC.

  • The head of Europe's biggest economy said Thursday that world leaders should be looking at the massive U.S. deficit and other economic imbalances, not just problems caused by financial markets, as they debate a new global order.

  • For most investors, the best thing about 2009 is that it isn't 2008, as one analyst pointed out. CNBC experts share their predictions for the year to come as the world goes through the worst recession in generations.

  • The Swiss franc is likely to shine over the next two years as other currencies are set to weaken, Christopher Locke, technical analyst at Oystertrade.com Management told CNBC.