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Europe Top News and Analysis Germany

  • It's that time of the year again, when Germany's trade unions traditionally put their wage demands on the table for the opening rounds of the annual ritual that is called "collective wage bargaining". And, with the economy growing at a robust pace still and with corporate profits on the rise, the voice of the unions is getting louder again. We've already had some taste of strike this season. Is there more to come?

  • The European Central Bank left interest rates unchanged on Thursday amid continuing uncertainty regarding the outlook for the economy.

  • Retailer Metro said Thursday fourth-quarter sales rose 8.3 percent from a year ago, pushed higher by consumers making more purchases in Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe.

  • The European Central Bank seems to have little choice but to keep rates on hold this time as well, despite rising inflation. Money markets are still not back to normal and there are signs of a weakening economy.

  • European equities dropped on Wednesday, ending at their lowest close in 1-1/2 month as worries over the prospect of a U.S. recession rattled investors, while retail shares sank after Mark and Spencer's profit warning.

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    An evocative smell from childhood can quickly trigger the realization that cost cutting is not a strategy, but a reaction that, without corresponding investment, will doom industries.

  • Investors concentrating on fundamentals will find reason to buck the bearish trend, says our guest host, enjoying his time on our brand-new set.

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    Major central banks are satisfied with joint efforts to tame money market tensions around the turn of the year but will remain in close contact, policymakers said on Monday.

  • Euro-zone investors are the gloomiest in 2-1/2 years and their expectations for the next six months are the most pessimistic on record as the credit crunch continues to depress sentiment, a survey showed on Monday.

  • With the benefit of 20/20 hindsight we turn our attention to some of the big predictions of 2007 and whether investors might have been better off just rolling the bones.

  • European shares fell nearly 2 percent on Friday in their worst sell-off in almost a month, as concern about the outlook for U.S. economic growth resurfaced after surprisingly weak employment data.

  • High oil prices, driving up the cost of transportation and other services, as well as spiraling food prices contributed to euro-zone inflation staying well above the target while Swiss inflation came in at a 12-year high, data showed on Friday.

  • European equities bounced from the day's lows to end with small losses on Thursday, as gains in U.S. markets and rising oil shares offset the impact of weakness in banks -- last year's worst performers.

  • European shares ended the first day of trading in 2008 on a negative note Wednesday, as worries over global growth -- exacerbated by evidence of a contraction in U.S. manufacturing -- overshadowed news of consolidation in the banking sector.

  • European equities ended flat on Monday in thin trade as key markets stayed closed, with the region notching a slender gain of 1.5 percent in 2007, its worst performance since 2002 as a credit crunch whacked stocks.

  • European shares were broadly lower Friday, as weakness in banking stocks dampened investor sentiment, but U.S. stocks made firm gains at the open on the Wall Street.

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    The European Central Bank is determined to stop increases in oil and food prices becoming entrenched in a broader inflation rise, President Jean-Claude Trichet said in a newspaper interview published on Monday.

  • Hedge wise and sleep well. Or, as they say in German: Gut gehedged ist halb gewonnen! Silvia Wadhwa gives her take on the single currency.

  • German corporate morale deteriorated more than expected in December as firms took a dimmer view of current conditions, with retailers especially downbeat, a closely-watched survey showed on Wednesday.

  • British Prime Minister Gordon Brown will host German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Nicolas Sarkozy for a meeting in the first half of January on financial market stability.