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  • European Central Bank

    Many economists think he should be the next person to run the European Central Bank. But among government leaders in Berlin and Paris, where many of Europe’s most important decisions are made, Mario Draghi, the governor of the Bank of Italy, generates a palpable lack of enthusiasm, reports the New York Times.

  • A stock broker sits in front of a board displaying German share index DAX at the stock exchange in Frankfurt/M., western Germany.

    European shares were set to edge up on Friday, snapping five straight sessions of falls, after a retreat in crude prices.

  • A trader sits in front of a board displaying Germany's share index DAX at the stock exchange in Frankfurt/Munich, western Germany.

    European stocks were seen inching lower on Thursday, adding to this week's sell-off as mounting worries over unrest in Lybia sent U.S. crude oil futures above $100 a barrel.

  • Traders tell me stock markets are down in Europe today over fears about how its world class exporters could be hit by rising oil prices, specifically in emerging markets.

  • lisbon portugal

    Following in the footsteps of Greece and Ireland, the Portuguese market looks set for a speculative attack, Silvio Peruzzo, European economist at RBS in London, told CNBC.

  • Traders sit in front of their screens at the stock exchange in Frankfurt/Munich, western Germany.

    European shares are set to fall on Tuesday as concerns grow over the political unrest in Libya and Asian stock markets tumbled.

  • greece_athens_academy_2_200.jpg

    A new law devised to help Greece crack down on tax cheats is only one of the many efforts Greek authorities have made over the past year to change what has long been a way of life in this country — rampant tax evasion. But so far, to little avail. The New York Times reports.

  • Euro bills

    Traders point to the fact that there is no sign that Europe’s credit markets are beginning to seize up as they did last spring, with banks worrying about each other’s counter-party risk. That’s evident from the fact that there is no spike in LIBOR, the interest rate at which banks borrow unsecured cash from each other on London's wholesale market.

  • As investors fret about a default of Greece’s $300 billion debt bill, consider this: at $10.2 trillion, the Japanese bond market is the largest government debt market on the planet. And Hedge fund manager Kyle Bass, who made his first fortune betting against subprime mortgages, is now wagering that this market will collapse—soon.

  • Marchers shake hands with Egyptian Army soldiers on tanks during a demonstration against President Hosni Mubarek in Tahrir Square January 29, 2010 in Cairo, Egypt. Egytian soldiers were for the most part interacting peacefully with the marchers in Tahrir Square during the afternoon hours.

    The Egyptian military defends the country, but it also runs day care centers and beach resorts.  Since the ouster last week of President Hosni Mubarak, of course, the military also runs the government. And some say it has already begun taking steps to protect the privileges of its gated economy, reports the New York Times.

  • Spain

    Spanish savings banks, which have been ordered to raise more capital by the government, are facing an uphill struggle to persuade investors to help them improve their balance sheets, reports the New York Times.

  • "While valuations are not yet stratospheric we question where the support may come from for continued earnings growth in 2012 and 2013," Pedro de Noronha, managing partner at Noster Capital in London, said.

  • A trader sits in front of a board displaying Germany's share index DAX at the stock exchange in Frankfurt/Munich, western Germany.

    European shares were set to edge up Wednesday on optimism for European companies' health as the latest raft of results is released.

  • Traders sit in front of their screens at the stock exchange in Frankfurt/Munich, western Germany.

    European shares are expected to open higher on Tuesday, extending the previous session's 29-month closing high.

  • A trader sits in front of a board displaying Germany's share index DAX at the stock exchange in Frankfurt/Munich, western Germany.

    European shares were set for a mixed open on Wednesday, staying close to 29-month highs, as worries about the effect of China raising rates were offset by some strong corporate data.

  • wallstreet_sign_red_traffic_light_200.jpg

    The French financial markets regulator has begun to require hedge funds and other investment managers to disclose their short positions when they reach 0.5 percent of a company’s outstanding stock, reports the New York Times.

  • A broker works as his control screen shows a graph of activity on the French Stock Exchange in Paris.

    European stock index futures pointed to a mixed open for equities on Tuesday, with shares pausing for breath after a rally since the beginning of the month.

  • BOE_night3_200.jpg

    A central banker need not be loved, but at the least he should command respect — and in Britain these days Mervyn King cannot count on either, reports the New York Times.

  • egypt_protests_020211_240.jpg

    As protests continued for a 12th day, Egypt's newly named vice president and other top military leaders were discussing steps to limit President Mubarak’s decision-making authority and possibly remove him from the presidential palace in Cairo, the NYT reports.

  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel

    When the heads of the EU meet in Brussels on Friday, they will hear new ideas on how to save the euro, delivered by Mrs. Merkel and the French president, Nicolas Sarkozy, but written largely in Berlin, reports the New York Times.