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Europe Top News and Analysis Greece

  • Dublin, Ireland

    Investors are anxiously waiting for Ireland's auction of longer-term government bonds later Tuesday to see whether demand for periphery euro-zone debt is still going strong despite fears that gripped markets Friday.

  • The government of Greece suffered from a "lack of credibility" that worsened the nation's sovereign debt crisis, Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou told CNBC Monday, in a candid discussion of the country's recent fiscal makeover.

  • The government of Greece suffered from a "lack of credibility" that worsened the nation's sovereign debt crisis, Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou told CNBC Monday, in a candid discussion of the country's recent fiscal makeover.

  • Dublin, Ireland

    A planned auction for Irish government bonds is likely to go ahead despite jitters concerning the country's banks and debt that roiled markets Friday, analysts said Monday.

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    The international community has postponed bank stress tests for Greece to give the country breathing space as Athens prepares to test the success of its European roadshow last week by raising more money in the capital markets.

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    In two weeks, Alexandra Mallosi, 29, will be packing her bags and leaving the quiet Athens suburb of Holargos for Abu Dhabi to start a job as a hotel sales manager. It was not a tough decision, reports the New York Times.

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    For years, Anissa Benchamacha bought her meat in a parking lot, from vendors hawking near-expired products to Muslims eager to find food that met their religious requirements.

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    "No actor, no product, no sector, no territory should no longer be able to escape sensible and intelligent regulation and supervision," Michel Barnier, the EU Commissioner for financial services, warned in an interview with CNBC.

  • Lake Como, Italy

    Even when gathered at Italy's scenic Lake Como, experts offered a generally gloomy outlook for the economy—especially in the US.

  • NYSE Trader

    September and October hold bad news for stock markets and banks remain overleveraged as we head into the second leg of the financial crisis, says Pedro De Noronha of Noster Capital.

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    While immediate market tensions have mostly passed, the sovereign debt crisis continues to be a challenge in Europe and fiscal consolidation is an important “long-term project,” said Axel Weber, president of the Deutsche Bundesbank.

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    When the European Union stepped in this spring with a €750 billion ($955 billion) rescue package to back Europe’s weaker economies, the threat of imminent default practically disappeared, the New York Times reports.

  • You have to think about the world and its totality. There is a finite amount of capital,  just to plug fiscal deficits the world has to issue $4.5 trillion worth of new debt.  But where does this new debt come from?

  • Stonehenge, England

    The prehistoric monument of Stonehenge stands tall in the British countryside as one of the last remnants of the Neolithic Age. Recently it has also become the latest symbol of another era: the new fiscal austerity. The NYT reports.

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    Global youth unemployment has hit a record high following the financial crisis and is likely to get worse later this year, the International Labor Organization (ILO) said Thursday.

  • The flight to safety following the Fed's decision to extend quantitative easing saw the dollar make big gains against the euro and one strategist said the euro's rally may have peaked for now.

  • Budapest, Hungary

    The governor of the Hungarian Central Bank has it worse than most. Not only has the new government placed the blame on him, among others, for Hungary's stagnant economy, it has slashed his salary by 75 percent. The NYT reports.

  • Map of Europe

    A week after the authorities released results of stress tests on the largest European banks, market data is starting to provide an indication of whether the exercise had the desired effect on confidence. The answer: sort of. The NYT explains.

  • The Parthenon in Greece

    Behind the revival in confidence in Greece lurks fear things could still fall apart, the Financial Times reports.

  • Does the price action on major banks in Europe tell investors that the continent is now not a threat to risk appetite and that Wall Street can mount a sustained rally without a repeat of May’s negative blow-up?