Europe Top News and Analysis Greece

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    It remains unclear how the assets on European banks’ balance sheets will be marked down under various stresses. So, will there be a need for significant capital at European banks and if the stress tests are deemed worthy, will that allow those banks to raise the necessary capital?

  • Euro coin in front of the giant symbol of the Euro outside the headquarters of the European Central Bank.

    Europe has to "tame that huge, slightly ignorant but extremely powerful force … what you would call the bond market vigilantes" to save the euro, a Nobel economics laureate told CNBC Thursday.

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    If the European banks get credible stress tests and people believe in them, there will be "earning power," H. Rodgin Cohen said, adding, "once there is credibility, you can raise capital."

  • Euro

    For the first time in months, Wall Street trading desks are turning more bullish on the Euro and not betting against the currency, according to people familiar with the matter.

  • Jim Rogers

    Bond markets are a bubble waiting to burst because the world economy is facing even worse problems after central banks flooded markets with cash to try to get out of the crisis, famous investor Jim Rogers told CNBC Thursday.

  • Spain

    Moody’s Investors Service may cut Spain’s credit rating as much as two levels. The rating agency is currently reviewing Spain’s AAA foreign and local currency sovereign bond ratings. Spain continues to face fiscal challenges and falling growth expectations.

  • Yahoo

    Management can use all the smoke and mirrors it wants. The fact remains that Yahoo's stock price is just a temporary stop to some lower destination.

  • European banks stress tests are not as important for investors as the need for Spain to calm down market jitters about its banks, Jim O'Neill, head of global economic research at Goldman Sachs, told CNBC.

  • Greek riot policemen clash with protestors in the center of Athens on May 5, 2010.

    The violence in recent Greek protests is not just confined to that country and investors should price in civil unrest brought on by austerity, Philippa Malmgren, president of Principalis Asset Management, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • The European Debt Crisis - See Complete Coverage

    Investors everywhere were stashing whatever money they had into anything that might provide safety. Reflecting on those terrifying days of yore, you might understand why so much buying pressure amid market panic may have driven yields so low, but what about now?

  • Stocks are dropping over concerns over Spanish bank funding, lower China growth, IMF warning on Austria, SF Fed warning on US states, and strikes in Europe.

  • Even with the EU bailout, giving Greece 3-years of breathing room, the market is saying something is not right and that Greece will not be able to avoid some sort of debt restructuring.

  • View over the caldera of Santorini in Greece.

    Greece is preparing a make-or-break return to the financial markets next month as it plans to raise about 4 billion euros ($4.96 billion) in its first borrowing attempt since last month's bailout, the Financial Times reports.

  • Swimming pool in Greece

    As reports resurface that Greece is considering selling leases to some of its islands to pay down debt, fears are growing that the euro zone member could restructure its debt over the summer months. But analysts disagree, saying this would be bad for German banks.

  • The European Debt Crisis - See Complete Coverage

    I was hoping we could forget about the Club Med countries for a while. China's currency, the G20 Toronto meeting, and the sacking of McChrystal pushed Greece off the front page.

  • The move by China to allow a more flexible exchange rate for its currency shows that the danger of a double-dip recession is remote, Bob Doll, BlackRock vice chairman, told CNBC Monday.

  • Euro bills and U.S. dollars being exchanged

    The rebound of Europe's single currency may be jeopardized by reports over the weekend that France and Germany are mulling a two-tier euro zone, ING Bank analysts said Monday.

  • I’ve been warning about for some time about how doing stress tests are great, but there are at least two more steps that need to be taken for reduction of uncertainty over European banks and countries.

  • Estonia

    Guess what? The funniest thing happened in Europe on Thursday. A new country joined (yes, joined) the euro zone. And the mood here was upbeat. Estonia will begin using the euro on Jan. 1.

  • The European Debt Crisis - See Complete Coverage

    The stock market wants to go higher though. It is sloughing off bad news. Be it a headline in the Wall Street Journal that says Spain is in trouble financially, Greece being downgraded by a rating agency or German sentiment taking a downturn, the market forges ahead. I guess bad news is just the formula for a rising market.