Europe Top News and Analysis Greece

  • Greece

    Germany and France can't borrow or tax enough to cover all the debts of their southern neighbors.

  • Timothy Geithner

    Europe can survive the current economic crisis if its leaders make good on commitments to turn their economies around, Treasury Secretary Geithner told CNBC Wednesday.

  • The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has published its detailed economic analysis of the Greek restructuring program. It makes for truly grim reading.

  • The financial sector will be at the crux of market worries Wednesday, as the U.S. Senate moves closer to a vote on banking reform and German regulators explain their surprise move to ban naked short-selling on a group of bank stocks and sovereign debt.

  • Next year should bring a big change in how you approach these stocks.

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    As the Flash Crash in U.S. equity markets May 6 illustrated, problems in Greece can have grave consequences for not merely other Mediterranean economies and Europe, but U.S. and the broader global economy.

  • Europe could be headed for a period of stagflation as governments struggle to reform their fiscal policies and growth weakens, investor Wilbur Ross told CNBC.

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    As Greece gets its first instalment of aid from the European Union Tuesday, investors and traders are concerned about the fiscal strength of the other PIIGS: Portugal, Italy, Ireland and Spain.

  • The stock markets' March 2009 lows could be tested and even broken as sovereign debt continues to grow in Europe and stimulus measures wane, Philippe Gijsels, head of research at BNP Paribas Fortis global markets, told CNBC.com Tuesday.

  • Riot policemen push back demonstrators as they try to approach the finance ministry in Athens.

    European finance ministers meet in Brussels Tuesday and much of the talk will focus on how the sinners can be punished.

  • Euros at an angle

    The euro may be weakening, but it maintains a strong grip on the world's stock and commodities markets. For that reason, investors are keeping an eye on a full meeting of European finance ministers in Brussels Tuesday.

  • Debtor Nations

    Call it the eurozone two-step.  That’s what the euro nations in distress will be asked to dance  on Tuesday as their ministers present their recovery plans to the body of 16 eurozone finance ministers engaged in an emergency meeting in Brussels.

  • A new government is formed in Europe and problems ensue. They check the books from the outgoing administration and discover things are worse than they knew. If this sounds familiar, it should as this is what happened in Greece. It is now occurring in the United Kingdom.

  • If I had a "bucket list" to put together I would have the beaches at Normandy as number one. Greece and Turkey would be on the list as well. Never would I have thought of walking down the Red Carpet at the Cannes Film Festival (Or is it walking up the Red Carpet?).

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    As the euro plunges to a four-year low against the dollar and respected economists like Paul Volker wonder out loud if the currency will survive, reflection is necessary to determine why this once prestigious currency appears to be crashing on the rocks of uncertainty.

  • Euro bills and coins

    After a brief respite following the announcement last week of a nearly $1 trillion bailout plan for Europe, fear in the financial markets is building again, this time over worries that the Continent’s biggest banks face strains that will hobble European economies, the New York Times reported.

  • Former U.S. President Bill Clinton seen speaking during the inaugural Rural Summit in Washington, DC

    Former President Bill Clinton says it is "time to lower the rhetoric and talk about the facts," in reference to the government's scrutiny of Wall Street.

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    The European Cental Bank's bailout package is just a $1 trillion fig leaf covering the problem and a better move would have been to arrange for Greece and Portugal to leave the European Union.

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    Any assumption that the financial crisis is behind us is way off the mark, as the European Union is just shifting debt obligatoins between the public and private sector and not dealing with the undelying problem.

  • Wall Street

    Although financial conditions in the United States have improved since the 2008 crisis, events in Europe show their fragile underside, a Federal Reserve official said Thursday.