Technology Hardware

  • For more than 40 years, the NASA Innovative Partnerships Program has helped transfer NASA technology to the private sector. The result: products used by millions of people around the world in the fields of health and medicine, industry, consumer goods, transportation, public safety, computer technology, and environmental resources.

    For more than 40 years, the NASA Innovative Partnerships Program has helped transfer NASA technology to the private sector. Click to see some of their most commercially successful products.

  • google_logo2.jpg

    You can say all kinds of nice things about Google’s Chromebook laptop concept. You can say it’s ahead of its time. Or that it’s thinking way, way outside the box. Or that, as failures go, at least this one swung for the fences the New York Times reports.

  • Cramer explains why businesses of all kinds live and die by it.

  • Apple Store Upper Westside Manhattan

    Apple is challenging the dominance of department stores, according to The Wall Street Journal. But there are several functions an anchor serves that Apple is unlikely to fill.

  • Microsoft Office 2010

    The Supreme Court on Thursday unanimously upheld a $290 million award against Microsoft in a patent dispute, the New York Times reports.

  • Nintendo

    Nintendo's global president said investors overreacted to the debut of Wii U game console, one day after its shares plunged amid doubts about its consumer appeal.

  • Google Chrome

    Web companies including Google, Facebook and Akamai are joining forces on Wednesday to test the Internet's readiness for a future in which billions more people and devices will be connected.

  • RSA Security on Monday offered to replace its SecurID tokens for most of its 40 million users as it tries to regain customer confidence after prominent hacking attacks. The New York Times reports.

  • Stocks closed lower for the fourth-consecutive trading session Monday, led by weakness in banks and energy, as investors turned cautious over a slowdown in the recovery.

  • ignition_ent_140.jpg

    Ignition Entertainment is finishing work on "El Shaddai: Ascension of the Metatron," based on the Book of Enoch, an ancient text that, while not a part of either the Jewish or Christian canon, is printed in the Dead Sea Scrolls.

  • kinect_140.jpg

    Microsoft is expected to use the annual E3 gaming convention to reveal new plans for its Xbox Kinect, including a new slate of new titles.

  • e3_2010_crowd2_300.jpg

    Investors haven't had a lot of luck with the video game sector over the past few years, but this year there is excitement at the annual E3 trade show.

  • top_ms_140.jpg

    Microsoft is intensifying its efforts to appeal to both core gamers and non-gamers, announcing two new titles in its blockbuster "Halo" franchise Monday and plans to integrate live TV into the console.

  • Stocks extended their losses in the final hour of trading Monday, led by banks and energy, as investors turned cautious amid signs of an economic slowdown.

  • Steve Jobs

    Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference kicks off today in San Francisco at the Moscone center. Chief Executive Steve Jobs is expected to deliver the keynote address at 10 a.m. PT (1 p.m. ET), and is expected to announce several new software offerings.

  • Apple

    Some people will tell you that because the oddsmakers aren't expecting a new iPhone from Apple today, this Steve Jobs keynote isn't a very big deal. They're wrong. This is the most important Apple announcement in recent memory.

  • Youtube

    For many Internet users, YouTube is synonymous with online video. But Mike Michaud and several friends who live in suburban Chicago are trying to change that, the New York Times reports.

  • Steve Jobs

    Juxtapositions galore. Apple gets ready to debut its iCloud, while everyone else's cloud gets hacked. Portuguese elections set the stage for austerity, while austerity rocks Greece. Here's what we're watching...

  • Counterfeit goods generate hundreds of billions of dollars in sales each year, making up about 7 percent of all global trade.At US ports alone, counterfeit products seized in 2009 had an estimated street value of more than $260 million. Authorities are unsure just how many counterfeit goods enter the United States each year, but one thing is certain: Counterfeiting saps economies, puts lives in jeopardy and funds organized crime around the globe.So which counterfeit goods are seized most often?

    Counterfeit goods generate hundreds of billions of dollars in sales each year, making up about 7 percent of all global trade.

Contact Hardware

  • CNBC NEWSLETTERS

    Get the best of CNBC in your inbox

    Please choose a subscription

    Please enter a valid email address
    Get these newsletters delivered to your inbox, and more info about about our products and service. Privacy Policy.

 

  • Matt Hunter is the senior technology editor at CNBC.com.

  • Ari Levy

    Ari Levy is CNBC.com's senior technology reporter in San Francisco.

  • Harriet Taylor

    Harriet Taylor is a CNBC.com technology reporter based in San Francisco. She covers Apple, Uber and the sharing economy, cyber security and emerging Silicon Valley trends.

  • Julia Boorstin

    Working from Los Angeles, Boorstin is CNBC's media and entertainment reporter and editor of CNBC.com's Media Money section.

  • Jon Fortt

    Jon Fortt is an on-air editor. He covers the companies, start-ups, and trends that are driving innovation in the industry.

  • Josh Lipton is CNBC's technology correspondent, working from CNBC's Silicon Valley bureau.

Recode

  • Executive Editor, Recode; Host, Recode Decode podcast; and Co-Executive Producer, Code Conference. Re/code is part of the CNBC network.

  • Co-Founder and Editor-at-Large, Recode and Co-Executive Producer, Code Conference. Re/code is part of the CNBC network.