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Tech Hardware

  • RIM Headquarters

    It's a sad thing to watch. A great brand and a company with a dominant position slides into obscurity. Such would be appear to be the case with Research In Motion as competitors pounce on its missteps. The world appears to have found an alternative to its Blackberry addiction.

  • Micron

    Micron Technology has been trapped in a slow grind for the last month, but yesterday the bulls stepped in.

  • text_messaging_girl_200.jpg

    Parents can now use an array of tools to keep up with the digital lives of their children, raising new quandaries. Is surveillance the best way to protect children? Or should parents trust them to share if they are scared or bewildered by something online?

  • Apple Store Upper Westside Manhattan

    Apple Stores stores take in more money per square foot than any other United States retailer. But most of Apple’s employees, who sell those iPhones and MacBooks enjoy little of that wealth. The New York Times reports.

  • Medivation

    The takeout speculation that has ignited a small recovery rally in Dendreon is empty talk; instead investors interested in the lucrative prostate cancer drug market should look to Medivation as a more attractive acquisition target, says a Jefferies analyst in a research note Tuesday.

  • Steve Ballmer, chief executive officer of Microsoft Corp., speaks at a news conference launching the company's tablet computer Surface at Milk Studios in Los Angeles, California, U.S.

    When Steve Ballmer took the stage at Microsoft's mysterious press event in Hollywood, the bloggers in the audience gasped, but they didn't start to applaud until they saw just what the Surface tablet/PC hybrid he announced could do.

  • handshake_merger_200.jpg

    The software sector is rife with speculation that technology giants looking to diversify from PC and hardware sales will buy software specialists like Quest Software and BMC Software as merger and acquisition activity heats up in the sector.

  • Internet Security

    A secret nanoscale "backdoor" etched into the silicon of a supposedly secure programmable chip could give cyberattackers access to classified US weapons systems, including guidance, flight control, networking, and communications systems, according to a new report by cybersecurity researchers in Britain. The Christian Science Monitor reports.

  • computer-hackers.jpg

    This particular type of cyber-crime, if left unchecked, represents a significant danger to the long-term national and economic security of the United States or any nation targeted for attack.

  • Blackberry Bold

    As Research In Motion enlists Wall Street's help, CNBC contributor and former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina cautioned against moving to heat-sensitive touch-screens because women’s “fingers are colder.”

  • Amazon.com is testing out the viability of drone delivery for small packages.

    Amid the uproar about unmanned aircraft, researchers have been experimenting with the technology for years in many fields including combat.

  • Oracle's headquarters in Redwood City, California.

    Oracle is attracting upside option activity as the database giant attempts to rally off a nine-month support level.

  • Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks at the event introducing the new iPhone at the company’s headquarters October 4, 2011 in Cupertino, California. The announcement marks the first time Cook introduces a new product since Apple co-founder Steve Jobs resigned in August.

    Apple CEO Tim Cook admitted the Ping social network has failed to excite most users, hinted at closer relations with Facebook, and called gaming on the TV "could be interesting" for Apple.

  • Michael Woodford, former chief executive officer of Olympus Corp., at a news conference in London.

    Olympus is expected to reach a £10 milliom ($16 million) settlement with its former chief executive, Michael Woodford, who was summarily fired last year after he raised questions about $1 billion in suspicious payments made by the Japanese optical equipment maker. The FT reports.

  • Meg Whitman

    After Hewlett-Packard announced plans to reduce the largest amount of workers in its 73-year history by cutting 27,000 jobs, Jason Noland, analyst for the firm Robert W. Baird, said the firm risks losing key staff to Silicon Valley.  

  • AeroVironment's Raven drone

    As the two longest wars in American history come to a close, and defense spending decelerates, defense contractors are quickly devising ways to alter their war-time technology for commercial and civilian use.

  • Hewlett Packard

    The computer maker beat on earnings and announced plans to lay off 27,000 employees, or 8% of its workforce. Shares rose after-hours.

  • Hewlett Packard

    Hewlett-Packard’s expected restructuring announcement is “just the beginning” for the personal computer maker if Chief Executive Meg Whitman shifts to a digital strategy, says Mark Stahlman, director at TMT Strategies.

  • Reel of uninsulated copper wire

    With gold prices surging in recent years, the semiconductor industry has been increasingly replacing the precious metal with the more affordable copper in the wire bonding process, leading to huge savings in the cost of manufacturing a chip.

  • cloud_sun_200.jpg

    Riverbed Technology continues to make a case against itself for why it deserves any consideration among the ranks of the top cloud computing companies.

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