Asia Top News and Analysis Hong Kong

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    Asian markets closed mixed following a cautious day ahead of major U.S. data due this week and an interest rate meeting by the European central bank. Japanese stocks boar the brunt of declines, while Hong Kong investors enjoyed resilience in the Hang Seng.

  • Asian stocks closed mixed in subdued trading on the lack of a lead from U.S. markets which were closed on Monday for a public holiday.

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    Asian markets were mixed Monday, as investors stayed cautious in spite of reassuring statements by U.S. President George W. Bush and Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke on sheltering the economy from the turmoil in the markets.

  • A man uses his mobile phone in front of electronic stock boards at the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX Ltd.) headquarters in Sydney, Australia.

    Asian markets made solid gains Friday, ending the week firmly in positive territory as investors bet on a positive reaction to Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke's speech on monetary policy and housing in Jackson Hole, Wyo. at 11 am Singapore time.

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    Asian markets mostly finished higher Thursday, but were off their morning highs. Volumes were thin amid a dearth of strong incentives, with many market participants holding back ahead of a long weekend in the United States. Japan and South Korea both closed almost 1% higher. 

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    Asian stocks closed lower across the region Wednesday as investors shunned riskier assets on the renewed fears about the health of the U.S. economy. But markets were off their lows with South Korea closing just slightly in the red after plunging as much as 3% at one point during the session.

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    Asian stocks mixed Tuesday as fresh fears about the outlook for the U.S. economy offset healthy profits and orders at firms in the region, while the yen firmed as investors trimmed exposure to riskier assets.

  • Asian stocks were stronger in the afternoon session Monday with markets taking cues from a Wall Street rally triggered by surprisingly strong economic data, while the Japanese yen weakened against the U.S. dollar as risk appetite strengthened.

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    Asian stocks led by finance counters, were lower across the board in the afternoon session Friday, on concerns that problems in the U.S. housing and credit markets could push the world's biggest economy into recession. Australia, Japan and South Korea all closed down.

  • Three of Asia's biggest banks, including state-run giant Bank of China, revealed bigger-than-expected exposure to the U.S. subprime mortgage crisis, sending their shares skidding on Friday.

  • Shares in Bank of China and its subsidiary BOC Hong Kong slid on Friday amid worries that higher-than-expected exposure to sub-prime mortgages would eat into their earnings.

  • Hutchison Whampoa, the ports-to-property conglomerate controlled by tycoon Li Ka-shing, posted a 53% jump in first-half profit on Thursday as gains from the sale of its Indian cellphone unit overcame 3G telecoms losses.

  • China further loosened its capital controls to encourage money to flow out of the country and so tackle the economic problems generated by its record trade surplus. Residents will be permitted for the first time to invest directly in Hong Kong-listed securities under a pilot program to be launched in the northern port city of Tianjin.

  • No matter how many new investment options we have at our disposal, property remains the classic choice. It's no wonder. Land is something you can see, feel and step on. You can easily understand the value of a good location.

  • China earned an upgrade to its credit rating on Thursday from Moody's Investors Service to reflect exceptional strength in its external payments, favorable government debt trends and continued progress in economic reform.

  • U.S. investment firm Harris Associates is looking to sell its 14% stake in apparel firm Giordano International as it is not happy with the company's earnings and dividends, the South China Morning Post reported on Monday.

  • Hong Kong's bustling streets were noisier than usual over the weekend as a parade of dancing dragons, guitar-strumming rockers and protesters chanting "We want democracy!" marked the 10th anniversary of the former British colony's return to China.

  • About ten years ago, my editors dubbed me the Bond girl... for all the wrong reasons. It was my coverage of debt capital markets that earned the nickname. Since then, I've had an affection for fixed income markets. Yes, bonds are rather dull and poorly understood but they are frankly one of the most important things you need to know about, in order to make sound financial decisions.

  • Mainland China is the place to be, right? Not according to Peter Stock. The president and chief investment officer of Stock Investment Management says Hong Kong is a better value -- and he thinks the mainland is a bubble slated to burst. He joined CNBC's Mark Haines to tell "Squawk on the Street" viewers which Hong Kong companies' shares are poised to jump.

  • Hong Kong Disney

    Disney reports that it continues to support the struggling Hong Kong Disneyland. Well, now we may know one reason why it's struggling. Just as every Disney movie going back to "Steamboat Willie" probably has been pirated in China, China now has a state-owned amusement park that recently included a mouse character, a woman with black hair surrounded by seven... elves... and pirate music. Not pirated music (well, maybe it was), but pirate music.