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  • Why your water bill will likely increase Thursday, 19 Jun 2014 | 11:37 AM ET

    A new survey of 368 water utility companies across the country shows that 66 percent of them are not generating enough revenue to cover their costs.

  • Why so many Americans don't care about the drought Monday, 16 Jun 2014 | 10:44 AM ET

    The severe drought in the Southwest and other parts of the country is causing pain. But most Americans seem to take it in stride.

  • Severe weather prompts big companies to change Tuesday, 10 Jun 2014 | 1:46 PM ET
    Lake Cachuma, the primary source of drinking water along California's Central Coast, has dropped 50 feet and is at 35 percent capacity.

    Some S&P 500 companies in conservative states already are managing weather shifts, according to a new report. Inside the climate change fight.

  • Fracking's drought motto: No water? No problem Tuesday, 10 Jun 2014 | 10:53 AM ET
    Pump jacks and wells are seen in an oil field on the Monterey Shale formation where gas and oil extraction using hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is on the verge of a boom, March 23, 2014 near McKittrick, California.

    Opponents of fracking may have hoped the drought would stop the water-using oil and gas drilling process. They are wrong, for now.

  • Drought vs. legislatures: Drought is winning Thursday, 5 Jun 2014 | 11:38 AM ET
    Lake Mendocino, one of two major water storage lakes on the Russian River, is nearly empty on January 24, 2014, near Ukiah, California.

    Legislation proposed to ease the hardships caused by the severe drought may be too little too late.

  • How beer innovation just might save the planet Thursday, 5 Jun 2014 | 7:00 AM ET
    In Mozambique, SABMiller produces a commercial-scale, cassava-based clear beer, called "Impala."

    Dealing with climate change is a cost of doing business. From beer to insurance, how some companies are hoping to profit amid weather-related risks.

  • Poor rains in India, where farmers depend on the annual June-September monsoon to irrigate nearly half their land, typically stoke inflation- a key worry for Prime Minister Narendra Modi's newly formed government. India has sold a total of about 11.5-12 million tonnes of wheat overseas in the past two years, dragging on global prices.

  • WASHINGTON, June 4- The Keystone XL oil pipeline would be vulnerable to attacks threatening water supplies for millions of homeowners and farmers, according to a report by NextGen Climate, a political group led by billionaire activist Tom Steyer.

  • SINGAPORE, June 4- Gold was treading water on Wednesday, hovering near a four-month low hit in the previous session, as investors await U.S. economic data for cues amid increasing optimism about growth and weak bullion demand in Asia. Asia is home to major gold consumers, China and India.

  • *Indonesia, Philippines at greatest El Nino risk- FAO. Malaysia and the Philippines are working to manage water supplies and India has bolstered its food stockpiles. They are aiming to reduce the impact of the so-called El Nino, a weather pattern that can bring drought to Australia, Southeast Asia and India.

  • China opens first environmental court Friday, 23 May 2014 | 5:15 AM ET

    BEIJING, May 23- China opened its first environmental court on Friday, state media reported, as the country looks for new ways to tackle crippling air, water and soil pollution. The court established in the southern province of Fujian has appointed 12 specialist consultants who will assist litigators on technical issues, Xinhua news agency reported.

  • Coca-Cola to launch 'glac+¬au smartwater' in Britain Thursday, 22 May 2014 | 8:48 PM ET

    May 23- Coca Cola is expected to launch a new product- "glacéau smartwater"- in Britain, aimed at the country's 1.4 billion pound bottled water market, a decade after its Dasani brand failed in the region, The Times reported on Friday.

  • May 22- Duke Energy Corp has agreed to find and remove coal ash that a retired North Carolina power plant spilled into the Dan River, which provides drinking water to two towns in nearby Virginia, U.S. environmental regulators said on Thursday.

  • Northern Dynasty argued in a filing to the U.S. District Court for Alaska that the EPA exceeded its authority under the Clean Water Act in February, when the regulator initiated a rarely-used process under the Clean Water Act to protect Alaska's salmon fishery from the impact of the project.

  • SAO PAULO, May 22- Afranio Sobrinho has one of the most unpopular jobs in Brazil. Sao Paulo's main reservoir fell last week to an all-time low of 7.8 percent of capacity, raising the specter of a water shortage in a country with the world's largest fresh-water reserves.

  • Senate set to vote on $12.3 billion water bill Thursday, 22 May 2014 | 6:55 AM ET
    A garage that floated down a street is still submerged in floodwater June 16, 2008 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

    Congress is on the cusp of passing its first infrastructure bill of the year.

  • 'New normal': No one escapes pain in drought areas Tuesday, 20 May 2014 | 3:58 PM ET
    A tractor plows a field in Firebaugh, Calif.  The farmer had 20 percent of his almond trees removed because he doesn't have access to enough water to keep them watered.

    Analysts say farmers, businesses and consumers are all going to feel the effect of the drought hammering the West.

  • From 2003, developers flocked to register projects such as destroying heat-trapping waste gases at Chinese chemical plants or installing hydroelectric power stations in Brazil, and made huge profits by selling the resulting carbon credits for up to 22 euros a tonne in 2008..

  • Damages phase of BP Gulf spill trial set for January Tuesday, 22 Apr 2014 | 7:13 PM ET

    HOUSTON, April 22- The high-stakes penalty phase of BP's trial over its role in the 2010 U.S. Fines under the Clean Water Act could top $17 billion, an amount more than BP's profit in 2013, which after items was $13.4 billion.

  • WASHINGTON, April 21- The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review a ruling against Exxon Mobil Corp that ordered the company to pay $105 million in damages for polluting New York City's groundwater with a toxic gasoline additive. The decision not to hear the case leaves intact a July 2 U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that upheld the judgment.