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Eastern Europe

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  • A reported German challenge to European bond-buying dents the euro and commodity prices hit the Aussie - it's time for your FX Fix.

  • The Trade-Off That Created Germany’s Job Miracle Tuesday, 25 Sep 2012 | 1:49 AM ET

    More than a quarter of the work force in Spain or Greece is without jobs, but there is a city on the Danube north of Munich that has the opposite problem: not enough workers, the New York Times reports.

  • In Britain, Austerity Collides With Pension System Friday, 21 Sep 2012 | 1:27 AM ET
    London Housing

    It may be the age of austerity for many in Britain. For a former doctor, Geoffrey Lipman, it is anything but.  Dr. Geoffrey Lipman, who is retired, gets about $78,000 a year in his government pension.

  • No Easy Answers on How to Fix the Banks in Europe Sunday, 16 Sep 2012 | 9:20 PM ET
    A European Union, left, and a Hungarian national flag, fly outside the Magyar Nemzeti Bank, Hungary's central bank, in Budapest.

    Beleaguered countries like Spain have been counting on a quick and neat way to fix their banks without taking on more crippling debt. The New York Times reports.

  • BRIC

    Brazil, Russia, India and China – together termed BRICs have been an investment disaster and were a marketing-led concept , according to John-Paul Smith, emerging markets equity strategist at Deutsche Bank.

  • Costa del Sol region in Spain.

    Spain's economic crisis has prompted a movement within Spain dubbed it “rurbanismo,” a term invented to describe the reverse migration from city to country that has stemmed a generations-old trend that has long been the usual pattern in most advanced industrial economies, the New York Times reports.

  • Treasury Backs Plan for Standard Chartered Settlement Wednesday, 12 Sep 2012 | 8:55 PM ET
    This shows the logo outside the Standard Chartered bank in the Central district of Hong Kong, 22 September 2003.

    Lawyers within the Treasury Department have recommended a preliminary settlement with Standard Chartered, clearing the path for the British bank to pay a penalty to state and federal prosecutors and to move beyond claims that it flouted laws governing international money transfers. The NYT reports.

  • Chairman of the Federal Reserve Ben Bernanke speaks at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation headquarters, on February 16, 2012 in Arlington, Virgina.

    In September 1992, the Federal Reserve culminated a long-running effort to stimulate the sluggish economy by cutting its benchmark interest rate to 3 percent, the lowest level it had reached in almost three decades.

  • Bets on European Bonds Paying Off for Funds Tuesday, 11 Sep 2012 | 10:56 AM ET
    Euros

    When fear gripped the European markets in April, the money manager Robert Tipp decided to buy more Portuguese government bonds. He figured that European officials wouldn’t let the country turn into another Greece.

  • Greek Government and Public at Odds Over New Cuts Thursday, 6 Sep 2012 | 2:16 AM ET
    Greek Parliament

    Anastasia Kastaniotou, a struggling mother of three, stood near the Greek Parliament building on Wednesday and threw up her hands as she contemplated an €11.5 billion austerity package that her country’s government was trying to tie up this week to keep Greece in the euro, the New York Times reports.

  • Euro Lifts, Dollar Drifts, Hungary Is On Hold Thursday, 30 Aug 2012 | 8:03 AM ET

    Italy lifts the euro but China sinks the Aussie -it's time for your FX Fix.

  • Prosecutors Link Money From China to Iran Thursday, 30 Aug 2012 | 1:11 AM ET

    Prosecutors say they have unearthed evidence in recent international money-transfer investigations that Chinese banks may have flouted United States sanctions against Iran. The NYT reports.

  • European Shares Set for Cautious Open on Fears Over Spain Wednesday, 29 Aug 2012 | 1:03 AM ET

    European markets are set for a mixed open on Wednesday after the Catalonian region in Spain asked for a financial lifeline from the national government, raising concerns that the country itself will soon ask for a bailout.

  • A top German official at the European Central Bank on Monday defended the bank’s plans to intervene in bond markets to push down borrowing costs for businesses and encourage economic growth. The position puts him at odds with the president of Germany's central bank and highlights a growing split in the country’s policy-making elite.

  • European markets are called to open in negative territory on Tuesday as the debate continues over how far the European Central Bank (ECB) can, or will, go to save the euro zone.

  • European Markets Cautious On Euro Zone Uncertainty Monday, 27 Aug 2012 | 1:10 AM ET

    European markets are called to open cautiously Monday after mixed signals from euro zone politicians and officials over the weekend.

  • Austria's AAA Rating Under Attack From East and West Wednesday, 22 Aug 2012 | 4:37 AM ET
    Austria

    Austria's triple-A credit rating hangs in the balance, and analysts are divided as to whether the country is more at risk from its banks’ heavy exposure to ex-Communist Eastern Europe or from heavily indebted Western Europe.

  • Euro’s Medicine May Be Making Greece’s Symptoms Worse Wednesday, 25 Jul 2012 | 12:30 PM ET
    Greek Parliament

    Greece's official lenders are signaling a growing reluctance to keep paying the bills of the nearly bankrupt nation, even as the government seeks leniency on its bailout terms.

  • US Is Building Criminal Cases in Rate Fixing Monday, 16 Jul 2012 | 6:04 AM ET
    Gavel

    As regulators ramp up their global investigation into the manipulation of interest rates, the Justice Department has identified potential criminal wrongdoing by big banks and individuals at the center of the scandal. The New York Times reports.

  • This is a transcript of Warren Buffett, Alan Simpson, and Erskine Bowles' Sun Valley live interview on CNBC's Squawk Box, July 12, 2012, from 8am to 9am ET.  They discussed why the U.S. needs to address its mounting debt problem and suggested some solutions.