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Eastern Europe

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  • Some Weigh Restructuring Portugal’s Debt Friday, 25 Mar 2011 | 3:22 AM ET
    lisbon portugal

    As Europe struggles to come to grips with its debt crisis, which has deepened with the collapse of Portugal’s government after it pushed for yet another round of budget cuts, three numbers stand out: 12.4, 9.8 and 7.8, reports the New York Times.

  • The World's Longest-Ruling Dictators Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 6:38 PM ET
    With civil unrest spreading from the Middle East to other countries around the world with the help of social networking, it seems that no authoritarian ruler is safe. With this in mind, the question is who's next? The sudden disintegration of the multi-decade rule of leaders like Hosni Mubarak suggests that other long-standing dictators could go.Although Venezuela's Hugo Chavez and North Korea's Kim Jong Il draw the world's attention, the list of rulers considered to be dictators is a long one.A

    So, which dictators have been in power the longest and how have their economies fared under their rule? Find out!

  • For Europe and China, Nuclear Crisis Renews Fears Thursday, 17 Mar 2011 | 4:50 AM ET
    Nuclear Power Plant

    As Japan’s nuclear crisis intensified Wednesday, governments across Europe remained at odds over whether to scale back nuclear power programs or continue plans to expand, reports the New York Times.

  • 15 Countries That Consume The Most Alcohol Wednesday, 9 Mar 2011 | 1:25 PM ET
    From country to country around the world, people’s relationship with alcohol varies greatly. In some places it serves as a point of national identity, and in others it has become detrimental to a country's overall health. Recently, the World Health Organization (WHO) released on the global status of alcohol, in order to help countries combat the harmful use of alcohol and avoid negative health and social consequences. Along with data on estimated cost of alcohol abuse, drinking ages and drunk-dr

    Around the world, people’s relationship with alcohol varies greatly. In some places it is a point of national identity, in others it has become detrimental to a country's overall health.

  • Russia Cashes In on Oil Supply Anxiety Tuesday, 8 Mar 2011 | 3:36 AM ET

    Russia, which pumps more oil than Saudi Arabia, is reaping a windfall from the steep rise in global energy prices resulting from instability in oil regions of the Middle East and North Africa. The New York Times reports.

  • Hoping to Lead Bank, Italian Faces Hurdles Friday, 25 Feb 2011 | 5:48 AM ET
    European Central Bank

    Many economists think he should be the next person to run the European Central Bank. But among government leaders in Berlin and Paris, where many of Europe’s most important decisions are made, Mario Draghi, the governor of the Bank of Italy, generates a palpable lack of enthusiasm, reports the New York Times.

  • US Will Be the World's Third Largest Economy: Citi Friday, 25 Feb 2011 | 4:19 AM ET

    The world is going to become richer and richer as developing economies play catch up over the coming years, according to Willem Buiter, chief economist at Citigroup.

  • A new law devised to help Greece crack down on tax cheats is only one of the many efforts Greek authorities have made over the past year to change what has long been a way of life in this country — rampant tax evasion. But so far, to little avail. The New York Times reports.

  • Egyptians Say Military Discourages an Open Economy Friday, 18 Feb 2011 | 4:48 AM ET
    Marchers shake hands with Egyptian Army soldiers on tanks during a demonstration against President Hosni Mubarek in Tahrir Square January 29, 2010 in Cairo, Egypt. Egytian soldiers were for the most part interacting peacefully with the marchers in Tahrir Square during the afternoon hours.

    The Egyptian military defends the country, but it also runs day care centers and beach resorts.  Since the ouster last week of President Hosni Mubarak, of course, the military also runs the government. And some say it has already begun taking steps to protect the privileges of its gated economy, reports the New York Times.

  • Some Spanish Savings Banks Want More Time to Recover Friday, 18 Feb 2011 | 4:08 AM ET
    Spain

    Spanish savings banks, which have been ordered to raise more capital by the government, are facing an uphill struggle to persuade investors to help them improve their balance sheets, reports the New York Times.

  • Europe Makes Effort to Shed a Light on Short Selling Tuesday, 8 Feb 2011 | 5:20 AM ET

    The French financial markets regulator has begun to require hedge funds and other investment managers to disclose their short positions when they reach 0.5 percent of a company’s outstanding stock, reports the New York Times.

  • A Crisis of Faith in Britain’s Central Banker Monday, 7 Feb 2011 | 7:24 AM ET

    A central banker need not be loved, but at the least he should command respect — and in Britain these days Mervyn King cannot count on either, reports the New York Times.

  • As Germany Booms, It Faces a Shortage of Workers Sunday, 6 Feb 2011 | 10:52 AM ET
    Reichstag Parliment building, Berlin, Germany

    Employers in many sectors of the German economy are facing labor shortages, under the dual pressures of an aging population and inflation-fighting measures that have kept wages low in comparison with its neighbors.  The NYT reports.

  • Egypt Officials Seek to Nudge Mubarak Out Saturday, 5 Feb 2011 | 9:18 AM ET

    As protests continued for a 12th day, Egypt's newly named vice president and other top military leaders were discussing steps to limit President Mubarak’s decision-making authority and possibly remove him from the presidential palace in Cairo, the NYT reports.

  • Merkel, in Reversal, Urges Rescue of Euro Friday, 4 Feb 2011 | 5:03 AM ET
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel

    When the heads of the EU meet in Brussels on Friday, they will hear new ideas on how to save the euro, delivered by Mrs. Merkel and the French president, Nicolas Sarkozy, but written largely in Berlin, reports the New York Times.

  • Protests in Egypt Expose Rift Between Rich and Poor Monday, 31 Jan 2011 | 7:36 AM ET
    Egyptian demonstrators shout slogans next to burning police vehicles in Cairo on January 28, 2011.

    Some accuse the Mubarak government of deliberately fanning class tensions to create demands for the restoration of its brutal security state. But such resentments have built up here for nearly a decade. The NYT reports.

  • A Hefty Price for Entry to Davos Tuesday, 25 Jan 2011 | 8:33 AM ET
    Everyone gets the same color badge chain. But badge colors highlight the WEF caste system.

    Chief executives, government leaders and academics around the world are headed to Davos, Switzerland, for the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting this week — a heady power gathering that mixes business, politics and Champagne in the Swiss Alps.

  • Divided But Standing Tuesday, 25 Jan 2011 | 2:33 AM ET

    At least for this year, the euro zone will remain united  and no country is likely to default, analysts told CNBC.com. But debt restructuring is on the horizon for later.

  • New EFSF bonds are expected to be priced by investors with a yield 70 basis points above the German sovereign bond.

  • Germany Will Pay to Rescue the Euro: Bank CEO Wednesday, 19 Jan 2011 | 5:36 AM ET

    Expanding the EFSF is not the right solution, said Andreas Treichl, the CEO of Erste Bank, the Austrian-based bank focused on lending in Eastern Europe. Treichl added that one way or another, Germany will ultimately end up picking up the bill.