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  • The agreement by European leaders on Thursday to provide Greece with a second aid package has been greeted with optimism by market watchers, who are now closely eyeing what role China will play in the resolution of the crisis.

  • In Cautious Times, Banks Flooded With Cash Tuesday, 25 Oct 2011 | 12:59 PM ET

    Though financial institutions are not yet turning away customers at the door, they are trying to discourage some depositors from parking cash with them. NYT reports

  • Euro, Meant to Unite Europe, Seems to Rend It Thursday, 20 Oct 2011 | 11:23 AM ET

    As EU leaders scramble to present a united front for this weekend’s critical meeting in Brussels, anxiety is growing in Europe, and not just about the euro, the NYT reports.

  • EU Politicians Are 'Playing With Fire': Analysts Wednesday, 12 Oct 2011 | 7:08 AM ET

    Slovakia will most probably cave in to international pressure and vote for the expansion of the euro zone's bailout fund, but the previous rejection should serve as a lesson, analysts told CNBC.com Wednesday.

  • Emerging Markets Growth Stalls in Third Quarter: HSBC Wednesday, 12 Oct 2011 | 3:32 AM ET

    Growth in emerging markets slowed to its weakest pace for more than two years between July and September as manufacturing output decelerated amid fears of a global slowdown, according to figures from HSBC.

  • The direct financial impact of the euro zone debt crisis will be felt in Asia as trading volumes on financial markets fade, just as they have in the west. When markets are as jittery as they are now, it seems geographic diversification counts for little. The FT reports.

  • Regulators Clamping Down on High-Speed Stock Trades Sunday, 9 Oct 2011 | 6:55 AM ET
    NYSE trader

    Regulators in the United States and overseas are cracking down on computerized high-speed trading that crowds today’s stock exchanges, worried that as it spreads around the globe it is making market swings worse. The New York Times reports.

  • Slovaks Love and Hate Euro; Bailout May Lie in Between Saturday, 8 Oct 2011 | 6:54 AM ET
    UNSPECIFIED - FEBRUARY 07: Cathedral in a city, St. Martin's Cathedral, Bratislava, Slovakia (Photo by DEA / W.BUSS/De Agostini/Getty Images)

    The prospect of guaranteeing the debt of richer but more spendthrift countries like Greece, Portugal and even Italy has led to public outrage in tiny Slovakia, the second-poorest country in the euro zone where the average worker earns just over $1,000 a month.  Now it is threatening to derail a collective European bailout . The New York Times reports.

  • Look-Ahead to G20 Meeting in Paris     Friday, 7 Oct 2011 | 12:00 PM ET

    G20 finance ministers will meet in Paris at the end of the week to put the finishing touches on the economic reform agenda, prior to the November summit. In addition, the EFSF is set to get the final rubber stamp when Slovakia's parliament votes on the fund. Sarah Hewin, head of European research at Standard Chartered Bank, and Patrick Armstrong, managing partner at Armstrong Investment Managers, joined CNBC to discuss.

  • Greek Civil Servants on Strike     Wednesday, 5 Oct 2011 | 7:00 AM ET

    Greek civil servants are on a 24-hour strike to protest austerity, with CNBC's Steve Sedgwick.

  • Euro Will Get Worse Before it Improves?     Monday, 3 Oct 2011 | 12:58 PM ET

    More uncertainty remains for the euro. "Looking into the fourth quarter, there is significant downward pressure," says Jens Nordvig, global head of G-10 currency strategy at Nomura Holdings . "We could be testing the lows from 2010."

  • Bail Out Greece? Many Slovaks Don't Like the Idea Monday, 3 Oct 2011 | 3:21 AM ET

    With only two countries apart from Slovakia left to approve the extension of the euro zone's bailout fund, all eyes are on the Eastern European nation of around 5 million people who are not keen on helping richer Greece. 

  • Slovak PM Hopes for Bailout Fund Vote Mid October Monday, 3 Oct 2011 | 12:49 AM ET
    European Central Bank

    Slovakia's parliament may vote on the expansion of the euro zone's bailout fund as soon as mid October, but the risk of a Greek default is still possible, Slovak Prime Minister Iveta Radicova told CNBC in an interview in Bratislava.

  • Miroslav Trnka, CEO of IT security firm ESET, headquartered in Bratislava, joined CNBC to discuss Slovakia's forthcoming vote on expanding the EFSF (the euro zone bailout fund).

  • Cash-Short, U.S. Weighs Asset Sales Friday, 30 Sep 2011 | 4:21 AM ET
    US Debt Clock

    Like Americans trying to raise quick cash by unloading their unwanted goods, the federal government is considering a novel way to reduce the deficit: holding the equivalent of a garage sale, reports the NY Times.

  • Concerns over investment in Central and Eastern Europe have grown as a solution to the problem of sovereign debt in the peripheral euro zone has eluded policymakers and global growth has slowed.

  • What's Driving Volatility?     Thursday, 29 Sep 2011 | 2:00 PM ET

    John Tabacco, Locatestock.com, discusses what's behind recent market volatility.

  • Greek Bonds Lure Some, Despite Risk Thursday, 29 Sep 2011 | 10:14 AM ET

    LONDON—Greece may never be able to pay off its huge debts, but its bonds, long scorned by investors, are suddenly being gobbled up by hedge funds. After a number of investors struck gold by betting against French banks, many have turned their attention to the hot yet risky euro zone trade of the moment: buying Greek government bonds that traders say are changing hands for as little as 36 cents for each euro of face value.

  • Banks, Analysts Slam Hungary's 'Disaster' Loan Law Thursday, 29 Sep 2011 | 9:46 AM ET
    Budapest, Hungary

    Hungary's decision to help its citizens pay back the foreign exchange loans they took at the height of the economic boom a few years back has sparked outrage among banks and spooked foreign investors.

  • Interns Sue Major Movie Studio Thursday, 29 Sep 2011 | 5:17 AM ET

    Two men who worked on the hit movie “Black Swan” have mounted an unusual challenge to the film industry’s widely accepted practice of unpaid internships by filing a lawsuit on Wednesday asserting that the production company had violated minimum wage and overtime laws by hiring dozens of such interns. The NYT reports.