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Eastern Europe

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  • A Contrarian Bets Ireland and Hungary Will Rebound Wednesday, 8 Feb 2012 | 3:57 AM ET

    For months now, a big investor has been betting billions of dollars that two of Europe’s most wounded countries will bounce back from the beating they have taken during the region’s debt crisis, the New York Times reports.

  • Commentary: Reform Key to Growth in Russia Thursday, 2 Feb 2012 | 10:25 AM ET
    Vladamir Putin

    The Russia Forum, held in Moscow each February, brings together politicians and business leaders to discuss investing in this vast resource-rich country.

  • Portugal

    Investors are predicting that Portugal will be next in line after Greece to impose losses on bondholders as it struggles to meet the terms of a $103 billion bailout agreement struck with international creditors last May. The New York Times reports.

  • How to Approach Markets in Eastern Europe Friday, 27 Jan 2012 | 1:16 AM ET

    The region is utterly dependent on the health of the richer EU members. This is why, analysts said, when things will turn for the better, investors stand to gain from a faster recovery than in Western Europe.

  • Eastern Europe's Growth Hinges on Euro Zone: EBRD Thursday, 26 Jan 2012 | 5:37 AM ET
    Budapest, Hungary

    Growth in Central and Eastern Europe hinges on developments in the euro zone and a slowdown in the CEE region is already underway, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) chief economist Erik Berglof told CNBC on Wednesday.

  • Hungary Is a Red Flag: EBRD Chief Economist     Thursday, 26 Jan 2012 | 3:10 AM ET

    "Hungary is a red flag, we have to watch very carefully what's happening in Hungary but it's a little bit different from the other countries," Erik Berglof, the chief economist at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, told CNBC.

  • IMF Cuts Forecast for Europe     Tuesday, 24 Jan 2012 | 3:00 PM ET

    The IMF cut its growth outlook for Europe today, warning that the euro zone could enter a mild recession this year. Although the IMF kept its outlook unchanged, it wasn't enough to boost stocks, with CNBC's Sue Herera and Steve Liesman.

  • Hedge Funds May Sue Greece If Loss Forced Thursday, 19 Jan 2012 | 5:59 AM ET

    Hedge funds have been known to use hardball tactics to make money. Now they have come up with a new one: suing Greece in a human rights court to make good on its bond payments.

  • Euro Woes Could Revive Bout of Market Volatility Tuesday, 17 Jan 2012 | 5:15 AM ET
    annuities

    Investors are bracing for a return to volatility when markets in the United States reopen on Tuesday, the New York Times reports.

  • Downgrade of Debt Ratings Underscores Europe’s Woes Saturday, 14 Jan 2012 | 10:39 AM ET

    As Europe’s debt turmoil enters its third year, no clear solutions are yet in sight — despite recent signs that a new lending program by the European Central Bank might be easing pressures.

  • For Europe, Few Options in a Vicious Cycle of Debt Thursday, 12 Jan 2012 | 4:33 AM ET

    As difficult as the last two years have been for Europe, 2012 could be even tougher. Each week, countries will need to sell billions of dollars of bonds — a staggering $1 trillion in total — to replace existing debt and cover their current budget deficits, the New York Times reports.

  • Hungary Backs Down but EU Still Unhappy Wednesday, 11 Jan 2012 | 9:00 AM ET

    As talks between Hungary and its international creditors heat up, sharp European Union criticism of the country's lack of progress in tackling its high budget deficit added to pressure on Hungarian negotiators, who already seemed to be softening their tough stance.

  • Is Now a Good Time to Invest in Hungary? Monday, 9 Jan 2012 | 8:43 AM ET

    A Hungarian delegation prepares to resume talks with the International Monetary Fund this week, hoping to secure a credit lifeline while investors continue to push up the country’s borrowing costs.

  • Leaders in Europe Warn Against Extreme Populism Monday, 9 Jan 2012 | 7:32 AM ET
    Budapest, Hungary

    Hungary's economy is approaching "meltdown," analysts warn, adding another financial crisis within Europe and raising concerns about more extreme populist moods gaining ground. The Christian Science Monitor reports.

  • Austria Exposed to Hungarian Debt     Monday, 9 Jan 2012 | 4:40 AM ET

    "Concerns over rising default risk in Hungary do translate via Austrian banks relatively rapidly into Austrian sovereign debt risks," Richard McGuire, Senior Fixed Income strategist, Rabobank, told CNBC.

  • Hungary 'a Good Investment'?     Monday, 9 Jan 2012 | 2:10 AM ET

    There is a lot of negativity priced into Hungary, whereas Poland is considered the "darling" of Central and Eastern Europe, Bartosz Pawlowski Emerging Market Strategist at Barclays Wealth Management, said. "Before the month ends we're going to have more clarity and it's going to be a good investment," he said.

  • Hungary

    Fitch became the third ratings agency to downgrade Hungary's debt to "junk" status on Friday, invoking further deterioration in the country's fiscal and external financing and growth outlook and the government's "unorthodox" economic policies.

  • Markets to Remain Volatile     Tuesday, 3 Jan 2012 | 6:00 PM ET

    Tai Hui, Regional Head of Economic Research, SE Asia, Standard Chartered Bank, Singapore, says the first half of the year will be extremely challenging for markets due to lingering concerns about Europe.

  • Russia's Putin Dreams of Soviet Union-Lite Tuesday, 3 Jan 2012 | 6:29 AM ET
    Vladamir Putin

    Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin has a vision for a Soviet Union-lite he hopes will become a new Moscow-led global powerhouse. But, his planned Eurasian Union won't be grounded in ideology: This time it's about trade.

  • In Europe, Juggling Image and Capital Friday, 23 Dec 2011 | 5:30 AM ET
    European Central Bank

    Stung by souring loans and troubled government bond portfolios, many European banks are being forced by regulators to raise money to build up their cash cushions against future losses.