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Greece

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  • UK Treasury Fears Effects of a Euro Break Up Monday, 3 Oct 2011 | 12:51 AM ET
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    Concern is growing in the Treasury over the “very, very great” risks to Britain if the euro breaks apart, reports the FT.

  • ECB's Noyer Doesn't Expect Bigger EFSF Sunday, 2 Oct 2011 | 10:50 PM ET
    Bank of France governor Christian Noyer leaves the Elysee Palace after a meeting with French President Nicolas Sarkozy about the financial crisis.

    European Central Bank member Christian Noyer said on Monday it is unrealistic to expect an increase in Europe's bailout fund beyond what was agreed in July, but that he is open to schemes that would allow leveraging to expand capacity.

  • Poll: Is the Euro Overvalued? Sunday, 2 Oct 2011 | 6:14 PM ET
  • Greece to Miss Deficit Targets Despite Austerity Sunday, 2 Oct 2011 | 10:49 AM ET
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    Greece will miss a deficit target set just months ago in a massive bailout package, according to government draft budget figures released on Sunday, showing that drastic steps taken to avert bankruptcy may not be enough.

  • Greece Due to Unveil Plan to Sack State Workers Sunday, 2 Oct 2011 | 6:01 AM ET
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    Greece was expected to unveil its plan on Sunday to begin laying off state workers, the most contentious part of a reform package demanded by the EU and IMF.

  • Greek Older Civil Servants to Face Brunt of Cuts Saturday, 1 Oct 2011 | 8:27 PM ET
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    Greece and debt inspectors have apparently agreed that older civil servants near retirement age will bear the brunt of personnel cuts in the public sector, according to media reports.

  • Your Trade for the European Central Bank Meeting Friday, 30 Sep 2011 | 7:44 PM ET
    European Central Bank

    The euro's being whipsawed by talk of debt plans. Here's how to trade an actual European event.

  • Money Match Up Friday, 30 Sep 2011 | 5:30 PM ET
    Money Match Up

    Will Trichet reverse course and cut rates at next Thursday's ECB meeting? How to profit from next week's gathering, with CNBC's Melissa Lee and the Money in Motion traders. Also, the currency trade behind next week's jobs report, with Michelle Meyer, Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

  • Traders work in the crude oil options pit at the New York Mercantile Exchange.

    Stocks closed out their worst quarter since the financial crisis, but it might be too early for investors to breathe a sigh of relief, as volatility will likely continue.

  • Looking for Market Bottom? There May Be Hope Yet Friday, 30 Sep 2011 | 1:54 PM ET
    NYSE traders

    Coming off the market's worst monthly performance in three years, there are scattered signs that while the damage is not over yet, the worst may have passed at least for the moment.

  • How to Use Currencies to Trade Your Stock-Market View Friday, 30 Sep 2011 | 12:51 PM ET
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    Worried about Europe's troubles, but leery of using stocks to take a position? Here's the plan for you. 

  • The Parthenon in Greece

    The present crisis of the Eurozone is a direct consequence of a half hearted, half considered, half explained and therefore half finished integration process, writes the former Prime Minister of Hungary.

  • Cash-Short, U.S. Weighs Asset Sales Friday, 30 Sep 2011 | 4:21 AM ET
    US Debt Clock

    Like Americans trying to raise quick cash by unloading their unwanted goods, the federal government is considering a novel way to reduce the deficit: holding the equivalent of a garage sale, reports the NY Times.

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    It is the policy that dare not speak its name: the printing press. The time has come to employ this nuclear option on a grand scale. The alternative is likely to be a lost decade, Martin Wolf writes in the FT.

  • Dare Buy a Greek Bond? Thursday, 29 Sep 2011 | 12:30 PM ET
    Dare Buy a Greek Bond?

    Jon Najarian, Optionmonster.com, explains how you can make money on Greek debt. "You can buy it for 41 cents on the dollar," he tells CNBC's Brian Sullivan.

  • EFSF Expansion Only a Short-Term Fix: Ex-Fed VP Thursday, 29 Sep 2011 | 12:18 PM ET
    EU building flags brussels

    The German Parliament's vote to expand the role of the European Financial Stability Facility has given the markets a "confidence boost," but it is only a short-term fix to Europe's solvency issues, Dino Kos, former N.Y. Fed executive vice president, told CNBC Thursday.

  • Explaining Greece Thursday, 29 Sep 2011 | 11:32 AM ET
    Explaining Greece

    CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera explains how much debt Greece actually has and why the U.S. should care.

  • German Finance Minister Shoots Down Levered Euro-TARP Thursday, 29 Sep 2011 | 10:55 AM ET
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    So much for the idea of a levered Euro-TARP. German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble told lawmakers the European Financial Stability Facility would not be used to create a leveraged bailout vehicle, according to Dow Jones Newswires.

  • Bailouts Are Not the Solution: Market Pro Thursday, 29 Sep 2011 | 10:15 AM ET
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    As the sovereign debt crisis worsens, there is still a lack of a long term solution. Current rumors center on Europe extending their ability to bail out periphery economies.However, politics and implementation issues pose a significant challenge.As Greece has shown, so far these bailouts haven’t worked, and with debt burdens rising and problems spreading to the core, the situation is only getting tougher.

  • Greek Bonds Lure Some, Despite Risk Thursday, 29 Sep 2011 | 10:14 AM ET
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    LONDON—Greece may never be able to pay off its huge debts, but its bonds, long scorned by investors, are suddenly being gobbled up by hedge funds. After a number of investors struck gold by betting against French banks, many have turned their attention to the hot yet risky euro zone trade of the moment: buying Greek government bonds that traders say are changing hands for as little as 36 cents for each euro of face value.