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  • CNBC'S Domm: Our "Crystal Ball" For 2007 Saturday, 30 Dec 2006 | 7:14 AM ET

    Showing up for the first trading day of the New Year is a little like arriving for the first day of school. Good grades from last year no longer count, and the books are no longer relevant. That feeling is especially strong when the old year rang in some very comfortable double digit gains for stocks, and the path to the next year's profits is not so clear. The first week of 2007 is awash in data, including the Friday jobs report, auto sales, retailers'.....

  • Housing Experts See Bottom -- Probably Wednesday, 27 Dec 2006 | 4:21 PM ET

    Economists for Fannie Mae and the NAR advise CNBC’s Bill Griffeth to take short-term real-estate figures “with a grain of salt.”

  • In the final installment of cnbc.com's exclusive interview series, the financial markets strategist speaks to CNBC’s Tyler Mathisen about inflation, the Fed and investing in 2007.

  • U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson said Friday that China has pledged greater exchange rate flexibility but gave no timetable as the two sides wrapped up high-level talks aimed at strengthening shaky relations.

  • CNBC's Quintanilla: Our Trip to China Friday, 15 Dec 2006 | 9:19 AM ET

    As we've told you--CNBC's Carl Quintanilla was part of the crew covering the  just ended American-Chinese economic talks in Beijing. His reports appeared on "Squawk Box"  (see our earlier post today). Here are his personal and behind the scene comments on the trip. If you're a fan of big cities, you're a fan of Beijing...

  • CNBC's Quintanilla: U.S. Success in China? Friday, 15 Dec 2006 | 8:59 AM ET

    U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson met with Chinese President Hu Jintao in Beijing today, on the second and last day of what has been billed as a long-range "strategic economic dialogue" between the two powerful nations. CNBC’s Carl Quintanilla is traveling along with the U.S. delegation.....

  • Bernanke In China: Should He Have Gone? Thursday, 14 Dec 2006 | 11:34 AM ET

    As we've said (with CNBC's Carl Quintanilla's on-the-scene reports), U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson and Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke are in China this week. They're addressing issues the Bush administration - and Democrats for that matter – have with China's monetary and trade policies. To some here in the states, that’s the problem...

  • CNBC's Quintanilla: Currency Battle In China Thursday, 14 Dec 2006 | 8:48 AM ET

    U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson and other top American officials are in Beijing this morning for trade talks, appealing to Chinese leaders to help preserve U-S support for free trade. CNBC’s Carl Quintanilla is following all the developments closely and updated the “Squawk Box” crew this morning, also from Beijing.

  • Changes In China Not Likely Any Time Soon Tuesday, 12 Dec 2006 | 5:29 PM ET

    The Democrats are putting a lot of pressure on President George W. Bush and his administration to force changes in China’s trade and monetary policies. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson and Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke are visiting the Asian giant this week, and they’ve arrived with a list of demands for the Chinese government.

  • PIMCO's Gross: Bull Market Will Continue Tuesday, 12 Dec 2006 | 3:24 PM ET

    Today, the Fed made no change in interest rates—again. How should bond investors react to the decision? Erin Burnett had Bill Gross, the nation's largest bond fund manager, on "Street Signs" to find out. She also talked with Ken Volpert, the portfolio manager for Vanguard's Total Bond Market Index. It's the country's largest bond index fund and just hit the $40 billion mark this month.

  • Former Fed President: Don't Bet On Rate Cut Tuesday, 12 Dec 2006 | 10:50 AM ET
    Laurence Meyer

    In an earlier post--we told you what former Fed Governor Laurence Meyer had to say about the Fed's meeting today. He's pretty confident things will stay the same. Many agree--that the Fed will leave the federal funds rate unchanged - at 5.25%. That's where interest rates have been since June. Even though official word won't come until 2:15 p.m. ET...

  • Former Fed Gov: No Change In Fed's Message Today Tuesday, 12 Dec 2006 | 9:30 AM ET

    Investors won’t have to wait much longer to find out where the Fed stands on interest rates. The FOMC announcement comes at 2:15 p.m. New York time (and you can see it live on cnbc.com). It's widely expected that interest rates will hold steady at 5.25% for the fourth consecutive time. More important will be clues the central bank gives about its intentions for next year.

  • Word On The Street: The Day Ahead Wednesday, 29 Nov 2006 | 9:56 AM ET

    Time for "Word on the Street " and our look at the day ahead. Peter Kenny is Managing Director of Jefferies and Company. On this morning's "Squawk On The Street," Kenny basically said he was "down" on the economy.. He told Mark Haines--the overall U.S. economy is in a slowdown in some sectors.

  • After Bernanke Speech: What Should Investors Do? Tuesday, 28 Nov 2006 | 3:59 PM ET

    Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke spoke--but it seems few investors listened. Stocks drifted lower after  his speech. So--what's the next move for investors in 2007? That's the question for two analysts on Closing Bell. Citigroup's Chief U.S. Equity Strategist and Managing Director, Tobias Levkovich is very bullish on the economy.

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