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  • Muni Bonds Unlikely To Be Next Leg of Crisis Friday, 1 Apr 2011 | 3:57 AM ET

    The US municipal bond market is unlikely to cause the next leg of the financial crisis according to John Higgins, a senior market economist at Capital Economics.

  • JPMorgan's Dimon Warns of Regulatory 'Nail' in Coffin Thursday, 31 Mar 2011 | 1:50 AM ET
    Jamie Dimon

    Jamie Dimon, chief executive of JPMorgan Chase, launched a broadside against financial regulation on Wednesday, warning that new capital rules could be “the nail in our coffin for big American banks,” the Financial Times reports.

  • 15 Countries That Consume The Most Alcohol Wednesday, 9 Mar 2011 | 1:25 PM ET
    From country to country around the world, people’s relationship with alcohol varies greatly. In some places it serves as a point of national identity, and in others it has become detrimental to a country's overall health. Recently, the World Health Organization (WHO) released on the global status of alcohol, in order to help countries combat the harmful use of alcohol and avoid negative health and social consequences. Along with data on estimated cost of alcohol abuse, drinking ages and drunk-dr

    Around the world, people’s relationship with alcohol varies greatly. In some places it is a point of national identity, in others it has become detrimental to a country's overall health.

  • China's inflexibility on exchange rates makes it hard to fix trade imbalances, says a senior Treasury official. Even worse, China's tempting neighboring countries to follow suit.

  • Anger Brews Over Government Workers' Benefits Tuesday, 8 Mar 2011 | 8:15 AM ET

    More Americans are  seeing public servants as public enemies in some ways. It's a case of pension envy.

  • The White House is struggling to fill key financial posts in the administration as a combination of Senate opposition and candidates’ reluctance to join up leaves critical positions empty. The FT reports.

  • 5 Questions With Sakae Holdings CEO Thursday, 3 Mar 2011 | 8:22 PM ET
    Sakae Holdings Founder and CEO Douglas Foo

    Sakae Sushi has been synonymous with Kaiten, or the conveyor belt sushi concept. In an arena that is commonly associated with up-market pricing, Sakae Sushi has managed to dish out food at competitive prices. Anchor Christine Tan spoke with the founder and CEO of the company, Douglas Foo, about surviving the financial crisis and dealing with the current bout of food inflation.

  • The World’s 15 Biggest Oil Producers Thursday, 3 Mar 2011 | 11:59 AM ET
    Unrest in the Middle East has put investors on high alert as crude oil prices move seemingly with every development in the region. In order to understand the effect of those events on both US and global oil markets, a key figure to watch is the amount of crude oil produced daily in each country. With data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), a division of the Department of Energy, CNBC.com took a look at the countries that produce the most crude oil on a daily basis. Production is d

    With data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), a division of the Department of Energy, CNBC.com took a look at the countries that produce the most crude oil on a daily basis.

  • Recovery sign

    A growing number of municipal bond experts believe state and local government revenues will return to pre-crisis levels within two years, reflecting their optimism that the worst fears about rising defaults may not be realized. The FT reports.

  • Labor Unions Are 'Bankrupting States': Sen. Johnson Wednesday, 23 Feb 2011 | 12:43 PM ET

    The collective bargaining process with public sector unions needs to be restructured to keep labor unions from “bankrupting states,” Sen. Ron Johnson, (R-Wisc.), told CNBC Wednesday.

  • One thing is clear from the debate over whether a bankruptcy law should be enacted for states—bankruptcy as a concept and a process is misunderstood.

  • Protesters in Wisconsin Say They Are Staying Put Monday, 21 Feb 2011 | 6:32 AM ET
    Protesters fill the courtyard and steps outside the State Capitol building on February 16, 2010 in Madison, Wisconsin. Protesters were demonstrating against Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's proposal to eliminate collective bargaining rights for many state workers.

    Union leaders urged Wisconsin teachers to return to work at schools that are open on Monday, but large protests were expected to continue at the Capitol against a plan to cut collective bargaining rights and benefits to state workers. The New York Times reports.

  • 11 Major International Political Scandals Friday, 18 Feb 2011 | 1:54 PM ET
    On April 6, 2011, Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi is scheduled to stand trial for charges stemming from his relationship with Karima el-Mahroug, a nightclub dancer who performs under the name Ruby Heart-Stealer. According to the charges, he paid el-Mahroug for sex while she was still underage, and when she was arrested for theft, he used his political muscle to have her released from police custody. Berlusconi has been in this type of trouble before, but it’s widely speculated that this

    Click to see international political scandals that raised eyebrows and kept the tabloids in wide circulation.

  • Republicans Target Unions Across State Capitols Friday, 18 Feb 2011 | 10:17 AM ET
    Protesters fill the courtyard and steps outside the State Capitol building on February 16, 2010 in Madison, Wisconsin. Protesters were demonstrating against Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's proposal to eliminate collective bargaining rights for many state workers.

    Republicans who swept into power in state capitols this year with promises to cut spending and bolster the business climate now are beginning to usher in a new era of labor relations.

  • State Pension Plans Scramble to Avoid Bankruptcy Thursday, 17 Feb 2011 | 12:00 PM ET

    State pension funds, facing a potential multitrillion-dollar shortfall, find themselves in the center of a four-way battle: Employees and retirees expect to be paid their promised benefits; the pension systems have clear obligations but may not have the resources to pay them; politicians are looking for ways to resolve the underfunding and balance the burden among retirees and workers; and state taxpayers, challenged to provide for their own retirements, resent the additional tax load.

  • Wisconsin Seeks to Gut Unions to Rein In Costs Wednesday, 16 Feb 2011 | 10:44 AM ET
    Wisconsin Governor, Scott Walker

    Wisconsin is poised to strip collective bargaining rights from most of the state's 175,000 public employees in the boldest step by a new Republican governor and Legislature to solve budget problems by confronting organized labor.

  • Goodbye G20, Hello G-Zero: Bremmer Tuesday, 15 Feb 2011 | 11:57 AM ET

    World power is at a point where neither a single nation nor a block of countries will be able to drive their own agenda, Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group, told CNBC on Tuesday.

  • Poll: Time to Buy Muni Bonds? Monday, 14 Feb 2011 | 6:30 AM ET

    While some experts see this as an opportunity, skeptics says it's a new financial crisis in the making and that muni bonds should be avoided.  Tell us what you think.

  • How States Can Fix Budget Crisis Monday, 14 Feb 2011 | 6:29 AM ET

    States are caught in an extended fiscal squeeze caused by rising costs and lower tax receipts. In addition, the aid distributed by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, is pretty much used up.

  • G-20 Is Now G-Zero: Roubini & Bremmer Tuesday, 8 Feb 2011 | 5:11 AM ET

    The Group of 20 industrialized nations is on its way to obsolescence and the world  is at a point where neither a single country nor a bloc of countries will be able to drive an international agenda, according to Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group, and Nouriel Roubini, chairman of Roubini Global Economics.