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  • Libyans at the rebel-held eastern town of Brega celebrate after rumor spread that their fighters took over the town of Ras Lanuf from pro-Kadhafi forces during battles.

    The Libyan government announced an immediate cease fire on Friday morning—just hours after the U.N. authorized the use of force against the Qaddafi regime to protect civilians.

  • Cramer: Temper Your Enthusiasm Thursday, 17 Mar 2011 | 7:47 PM ET

    Don't get too caught up in this rally, the "Mad Money" host said.

  • Libya and Bahrain in Pictures Thursday, 17 Mar 2011 | 2:59 PM ET
    A Libyan rebel fighter flashs the victory sign as he carries rocket propelled grenades at a check point near the key city of Ajdabiya on March 23, 2011 as government forces have encircled the town.

    It is often said that a picture speaks a thousand words, but these images arguably speak volumes about the violence and political turmoil in Libya and Bahrain.

  • 'Business-Friendly Bahrain' Disappears; Ex-Pats Exit Thursday, 17 Mar 2011 | 8:38 AM ET
    Passengers line up for flights out of Bahrain at the country's airport March 17.

    "A sense of calm with an undercurrent of mild panic," is how one Bahraini described the scene at Bahrain International Airport Thursday morning,after the Bahrain Defense Force (BDF) cleared the country's Pearl Roundabout area of anti-government protestors, killing at least three people.

  • Will China's Regime be the Next to Collapse? Wednesday, 16 Mar 2011 | 11:39 PM ET
    Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao pledged to tackle public concerns such as inflation, runaway growth, and corruption in an apparent bid to defuse a call for weekly rallies in 13 Chinese cities as similar issues touched off political convulsions in the Middle East and North Africa.

    As unrest spreads throughout the Middle East, western observers like Elizabeth Economy of the Council on Foreign Relations argue China’s government might collapse. The reasoning? Unhappiness over economic disparity. They also believe the demand for materialism is being replaced by desire for political plurality.

  • Fukishima nuclear reactor explosion.

    The complexity and uncertainty surrounding Japan's nuclear crisis has created a great divide between investors who are now running from risk and those who think they can ride it out.

  • Looking to Lighten Up? Here's How Wednesday, 16 Mar 2011 | 8:55 PM ET

    Cramer has advice for investors who want to sell stocks now.

  • Cramer: Stocks That Work Amidst Japan Crisis Wednesday, 16 Mar 2011 | 7:00 PM ET

    Consider these five dividend-paying stocks, the "Mad Money" host said.

  • The yen rallied to a new all-time high against the dollar as traders speculated G-7 central bankers may be getting ready to intervene to drive the currency lower.

  • Bahrain Fighting Moves from Roundabout to Villages Wednesday, 16 Mar 2011 | 10:38 AM ET
    Anti-government protestors open their arms in front of military vehicles near Pearl Square in Bahraini capital Manama, on March 16, 2011, after Bahraini police killed at least two protesters and wounded dozens more as they assaulted a peaceful protest camp in the capital's Pearl Square, an opposition party official said. AFP PHOTO/STR (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images)

    Manama's central financial district and the iconic Pearl Roundabout were quiet Wednesday night, despite earlier calls from opposition groups who said they planned to regain their presence there.

  • Libyan Oil Buys Allies for Qaddafi Wednesday, 16 Mar 2011 | 10:04 AM ET
    Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi

    From Liberia to South Africa to the island of Madagascar, Libya’s holdings are like a giant venture capital fund, geared to make friends and wi n influence in the poorest region in the world.  The NYT reports.

  • Traders Need New Strategies Wednesday, 16 Mar 2011 | 9:10 AM ET

    Unfortunately, a short-covering rally in Japanese equities does not mean the nuclear crisis there is over. However, traders this morning are trying to look down the road. Simply put: chaos means dislocations.

  • Bahraini Banker: Meritocracy, Not Nepotism, Needed Wednesday, 16 Mar 2011 | 3:32 AM ET

    abstract

  • A group of Chinese citizens at the City Hall await transport to leave the tsunami devastated city of Sendai, Miyagi prefecture on March 15, 2011.

    Markets will stay sensitive to any developments with Japan's unfolding nuclear crisis or from Middle East trouble spots, and that could once more weigh on risk assets.

  • Bahrain Military to Secure Capital Tonight: Sources Tuesday, 15 Mar 2011 | 3:50 PM ET
    A Bahraini anti-regime protester holds up a poster with a caricature image of Prime Minister Khalifa bin Salman al-Khalifa calling him a "war criminal" during a demonstration in the capital Manama.

    The Bahrain military plans to secure the country's capital Tuesday night, clearing the Pearl Roundabout where protests have been held since mid-February, and securing government buildings, sources in the country told CNBC.

  • IEA Says Libyan Oil Exports Halted Tuesday, 15 Mar 2011 | 7:43 AM ET

    The International Energy Agency says Libyan oil exports have "ground to a halt" because of the fighting between rebels and forces loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi.

  • US State Dept Urges Americans to Avoid Bahrain Tuesday, 15 Mar 2011 | 4:09 AM ET
    Protesters run from a cloud of teargas during a clash with Bahraini security forces near the Pearl roundabout in Manama, Bahrain. Protesters said that the army fired on them with live rounds, followed by teargas which drove the demonstrators back. There are unconfirmed reports that there are four dead in the clashes.

    The U.S. State Department urged U.S. citizens on Tuesday to defer travel to Bahrain and suggested Americans there should leave due to ongoing political and civil unrest.

  • Quake Provides 'Excuse' for More Easing: Economist Tuesday, 15 Mar 2011 | 3:22 AM ET

    Following the huge losses on the Nikkei, with more than $700 billion dollars wiped off the Japanese market in just two sessions, one economist is predicting the tragic events in Japan will be an "excuse" 'to move to quantitative easing in all major markets.

  • Mideast Still Biggest Worry for Markets: Cantor CEO Monday, 14 Mar 2011 | 3:37 PM ET
    A rebel fighter greets a crowd of comrades while heading towards the frontline in Ajdabiya, Libya.

    Despite Japan's massive earthquake and tsunami's impact on global markets, the escalating violence in the Middle East still poses the biggest threat for investors, according to Shawn Matthews, CEO of Cantor Fitzgerald, a privately-owned investment bank.

  • A Bahraini anti-regime protester holds up a poster with a caricature image of Prime Minister Khalifa bin Salman al-Khalifa calling him a "war criminal" during a demonstration in the capital Manama.

    General confusion reigns and businesses prepare for another day off as Gulf Cooperation Council forces deploy in Bahrain.