GO
Loading...

Illinois

More

  • *Russia to send troops to Crimea amid NATO exercises in Ukraine. NEW YORK, Sept 16- U.S. crude futures rose more by more than $2 and Brent by more than $1 on Tuesday on the prospect of an OPEC production cut as well as on a weakening dollar and news that Libya had curbed output after rockets hit an area near a refinery.

  • WASHINGTON, Sept 16- U.S. lawmakers are considering proposals to deal with a rising number of U.S. companies reincorporating overseas to slash their tax bills.

  • Big cities take aim at prescription painkillers Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 | 12:29 PM ET

    The heightened rhetoric comes as Chicago tries to recover millions in health care costs from opioid drugmakers, alleging that companies deliberately misled the public about the risks of their drugs.

  • *OPEC to cut output target in November meeting- Badri. NEW YORK, Sept 16- Brent and U.S. crude futures rose more than a dollar on Tuesday on the prospect of a possible OPEC production cut and on news that Libya curbed output after rockets hit an area near a refinery.

  • Grain lower, livestock lower Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 | 11:05 AM ET

    CHICAGO— Grain futures were lower Tuesday in early trading on the Chicago Board of Trade. Wheat for Dec delivery was 1.25 cents higher at $5.01 a bushel; Dec corn was 3.25 cents lower at $3.3975 a bushel; Dec oats were unchanged at $3.5450 a bushel; while Nov soybeans declined 11 cents to $9.7850 a bushel.

  • Sears takes $400M loan from Lampert's hedge fund Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 | 7:47 AM ET

    NEW YORK— Sears is taking out a $400 million secured short-term loan from a hedge fund run by CEO Edward Lampert. The Hoffman Estates, Illinois, company, which runs Sears and Kmart stores, said in a regulatory filing that the loan is from entities affiliated with Lampert's ESL Investments Inc..

  • Farmers and analysts say the elimination of government incentives to buy new equipment, a related overhang of used tractors, and a reduced commitment to biofuels, all darken the outlook for the sector beyond 2019- the year the U.S. Department of Agriculture says farm incomes will begin to rise again.

  • David Heiman, whose law firm Jones Day represents Detroit, told Rhodes that Syncora and the city "have laid down their swords." In a court filing on Monday, Syncora confirmed a "comprehensive settlement" with the city that was still subject to "definitive documentation and resolution of other terms.

  • United offers up to $100K if workers leave Monday, 15 Sep 2014 | 4:49 PM ET

    DALLAS— United Airlines reached a deal with the flight attendants' union to offer up to $100,000 in severance for workers who leave the company. The company, formed by a 2010 merger, has seen growth on what used to be Continental Airlines, which hired 485 flight attendants last year.

  • Once-troubled reverse mortgages poised for rebound Monday, 15 Sep 2014 | 2:43 PM ET

    Industry analysts expect strong growth as the housing market improves, particularly in once hard-hit Sun Belt areas including Phoenix, Miami and San Diego, California, and aging Americans find value in growing old in their homes. They are also being boosted by high-appreciation, gentrifying neighborhoods in older cities such as New York's Brooklyn borough.

  • Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes that Syncora and the city "have laid down their swords." In a court filing on Monday, Syncora confirmed a "comprehensive settlement" with the city that was still subject to "definitive documentation and resolution of other terms.

  • Grain mostly higher, beef and pork lower Monday, 15 Sep 2014 | 11:03 AM ET

    CHICAGO— Grain futures were mostly higher Monday on the Chicago Board of Trade. Wheat for Dec delivery fell 1.75 cents to $5.0075 a bushel; Dec corn was 4.50 cents higher at 3.43 a bushel; Dec oats rose 6.25 cents to $3.5450 a bushel; while Nov soybeans gained 4.25 cents to $9.8950 a bushel.

  • Detroit bankruptcy trial resumes after settlement Monday, 15 Sep 2014 | 4:02 AM ET

    The trial was suspended last Wednesday so Detroit and Syncora could reach an agreement. Syncora is getting cash and long-term leases on a parking garage and the tunnel between Detroit and Canada, among other concessions.

  • RENAULT- NISSAN SAYS NO DECISION MADE ON ALLIANCE BATTERY PROCUREMENT.

  • Kids' poisonings linked to anti-addiction medicine Monday, 15 Sep 2014 | 12:01 AM ET

    CHICAGO— An anti-addiction drug used to fight the nation's heroin and painkiller abuse epidemics poses a threat to young children who accidentally swallow relatives' prescriptions, a federal study says.

  • Hundreds of workers on strike at Lear Corp. plant Saturday, 13 Sep 2014 | 10:28 AM ET

    INDIANAPOLIS— Hundreds of workers protesting what some are calling fast-food-like wages walked off the job Saturday at a Lear Corp. plant in northwest Indiana that makes automotive seats, beginning a strike that could affect a major Ford assembly plant in Chicago.

  • *Fed may raise short-term rates in first quarter- BlackRock. NEW YORK, Sept 12- Traders piled into U.S. short-term interest rates options on Friday, adopting a bearish posture on the view the Federal Reserve will signal next week that interest rates will be notably higher by the end of next year.

  • NYC bill would ban credit checks in hiring, firing Friday, 12 Sep 2014 | 2:34 PM ET

    NEW YORK— New York City Council members held a hearing Friday on a bill that would prevent companies from using credit checks in employment decisions, a practice that they said harms the very people who need jobs the most. "We're here today for the simple cause of fairness," said Councilman Brad Lander, a Brooklyn Democrat who is the bill's chief sponsor.

  • Disturbing elements ahead of Alibaba IPO Friday, 12 Sep 2014 | 1:42 PM ET

    Ax Alibaba heads to the big time with an IPO that could value the company at $162 billion, the e-commerce group is contending with online offers of gallium and uranium. The FT reports.

  • Next for Corporate America: Body wires and wire taps? Friday, 12 Sep 2014 | 11:22 AM ET

    WASHINGTON, Sept 12- Wall Street executives may have personally escaped the wrath of the U.S. Department of Justice but executives at companies accused of foreign bribery schemes may not be so lucky.