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  • Henes: Economic Lessons Learned From Hurricane Irene Monday, 29 Aug 2011 | 11:07 AM ET
    A New York City Police car drives through a flooded intersection on 43nd Street in New York on August 28, 2011 as Hurricane Irene hits the city and Tri State area with rain and high winds.

    As the rain has moved past New York City and Long Island and wind gusts have subsided, it seems to me that we can learn some things from the experience that relate to the government's current handling of the economy.

  • A fallen tree which also knocked over a power line is seen on Loughboro Road after Hurricane Irene swept through the area.

    Hurricane Irene was the 'Perfect Storm' for insurers in a different sense of the cliche. The weakened storm that spared New York city from major damage gave the wealthy and rarely hit Northeast enough of a scare because of ominous weather forecasts leading up the storm that property insurers will be able to raise pricing even more next year, according to a Morgan Stanley analyst.

  • Irene to Have Little Bite on Struggling US Economy Sunday, 28 Aug 2011 | 10:30 PM ET
    A taxi passes by a warning sign on the side of the Port Authority in New York on August 28, 2011 as Hurricane Irene hits the city and the Tri State area with rain and high winds. Irene weakened to tropical storm status Sunday as it hit New York City.

    Hurricane Irene will take a very small bite out of a U.S. economy already struggling with debt and unemployment after businesses across the East Coast closed their doors ahead of the deadly storm.

  • A police officer patrols the beach next to the synthetic plank boardwalk in Spring Lake, New Jersey, which was mostly destroyed and rendered unusable by Hurricane Irene.

    Beaches along the Atlantic coast took a beating over the weekend from Hurricane Irene, which caused heavy damage to some popular seaside tourist towns while sparing others the worst of its powerful wind and waves.

  • MTA Head Discusses Storm Impact     Sunday, 28 Aug 2011 | 1:43 PM ET

    Jay Walder, MTA chairman, says actions taken before Hurricane Irene hit New York City were "right."

  • Damage From Irene Appears to Be Less Than Feared Sunday, 28 Aug 2011 | 11:34 AM ET
    Plastic tape blocks the entrance to the Chambers St subway station August 27, 2011 in New York City. In anticipation of a large storm or hurricane hitting the city, the New York City mass transit network, the nation’s largest, closed at noon on Saturday, ending subway, bus, and commuter rail service until Monday.

    Damage from Irene appears to be less than feared, a bit of reassuring news for a fragile economy.

  • After Irene: Little Damage Seen in Many Places Sunday, 28 Aug 2011 | 11:20 AM ET

    From North Carolina to Pennsylvania, Hurricane Irene appeared to have fallen short of the doomsday predictions. But with rivers still rising, and roads impassable because of high water and fallen trees, it could be days before the full extent of the damage is known.

  • Irene 'Wounding' Weekend Box Office Saturday, 27 Aug 2011 | 10:22 PM ET
    Plastic tape blocks the entrance to the Chambers St subway station August 27, 2011 in New York City. In anticipation of a large storm or hurricane hitting the city, the New York City mass transit network, the nation’s largest, closed at noon on Saturday, ending subway, bus, and commuter rail service until Monday.

    Hurricane Irene and the closure of at least 1,000 theater locations along the East Coast is expected to put a dent in this weekend's domestic box office.

  • Scenes From Hurricane Irene Saturday, 27 Aug 2011 | 12:41 PM ET
    So far in 2011, the storm of the Hurricane season is Irene, a category 2 hurricane that is expected to affect the Eastern US  The storm has already passed through the Carribean, causing widespread damage while the Eastern US prepares for landfall. The entire eastern seaboard is being told to expect high winds and flooding as a result of the storm, although the resulting damage is anyone's guess. CNBC.com will be updating this slideshow with fresh images of the storm as they come in, illustrating

    From emergency preparation to landfall, see how the Northeast is impacted by Hurricane Irene.

  • NYC Ready for Irene?     Friday, 26 Aug 2011 | 7:00 PM ET

    It's been an eerily beautiful day in New York before Hurricane Irene nears, reports CNBC's Courtney Reagan.

  • CNBC.com Market Outlook     Friday, 26 Aug 2011 | 5:00 PM ET

    The week's top business and investment news, including Hurricane Irene and banking plays.

  • NYC's Contingency Plan     Friday, 26 Aug 2011 | 4:10 PM ET

    Mayor Michael Bloomberg orders mandatory evacuation of low lying areas, with CNBC's Courtney Reagan.

  • What $1 Million Buys You Tuesday, 23 Aug 2011 | 6:30 PM ET
    Who hasn’t spent at least a few daydreaming moments fantasizing about spending money? Not just a few hundred bucks either, but huge, irresponsible sums of money, all on completely unnecessary luxury items? Most of us probably have, but sadly, reality tends to intervene. Just as we’re settling into a meditation about a chartered plane jetting us off to Aruba, the memory of that unpaid and overdue $250 phone bill intrudes and throws cold water on the fantasy.If one were to make a completely uneduc

    $1 million isn’t what it used to be, in part because a lot of people don’t know how far it can go, and the amount of time and effort that it would take to spend it.

  • Wall Street Shaken, Not Stirred Tuesday, 23 Aug 2011 | 2:22 PM ET
    Crowds are evacuated from buildings on Wall Street in New York City after the 5.9 earthquake shook the East Coast of the United States.

    Offices throughout Manhattan were rocked by the 6.0 earthquake today.

  • 10 Major Architectural Failures Monday, 22 Aug 2011 | 4:09 PM ET
    People make mistakes, and sometimes those mistakes happen on the job. Usually, the incident is corrected and the whole thing is forgotten within minutes. However, the workplace mistake is harder to ignore when the person who makes it is an architect. After all, when the teenager working the drive-thru window gives you a Quarter Pounder instead of a Big Mac, it causes a lot less trauma than when a 3,000 foot long suspension bridge collapses into the Puget Sound.In , the legendary American archite

    These mistakes are big, costly and spectacular. What are some of the more notable architectural failures in modern history?

  • Empire State Building, New York, NY

    This fall, New York City will become the lead U.S. municipality to roll out new rules aimed at gathering data on buildings.

  • Thinking Small Monday, 15 Aug 2011 | 10:09 AM ET

    JumpStart NYC was created to help unemployed professionals apply their knowledge, skills and abilities in opportunities at small, entrepreneurial companies.

  • A participant at a Tea Party Express rally displays a sign critical of the Obama administration on April 13, 2010 in Albany, New York. The Tea Party Express will head to Boston on Wednesday where the headline speaker at an afternoon rally will be Sarah Palin.

    Although it’s a bit far afield from my usual stomping grounds of Wall Street and financial regulation, I think it might be helpful for some of my readers to have a better understanding of presidential politics.

  • Top Jobs for Sports Fans Thursday, 11 Aug 2011 | 4:09 PM ET
    The field of professional sports is as competitive as they come, and sadly, not everyone gets to play. For every athlete who makes the cut and plays at the professional level, there are countless others who will never be so lucky. Sometimes a promising career is hobbled by an injury. Sometimes a fire in the belly doesn’t burn as brightly as it needs to. And sometimes the player simply isn’t that good. Indeed, the reasons behind the dashed dreams of aspiring athletes are many.But cheer up! Just b

    Professional athletes need people to make their lives run smoothly, so click ahead to see careers in sports that are performed outside of the spotlight.

  • Reaping Millions in Nonprofit Care for Disabled Tuesday, 2 Aug 2011 | 11:31 AM ET

    Two brothers earned millions of dollars from Medicaid funding as executives of a non-profit organization that provides care to the developmentally disabled, the New York Times reports.