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  • What Investors Need to Hear From Bernanke Tuesday, 9 Aug 2011 | 10:11 AM ET

    Investors are hungry for good news from today's FOMC meeting. Here's what Ben Bernanke can — and can't — deliver.

  • Equities Still Paying Dividends: Warren     Tuesday, 9 Aug 2011 | 5:30 AM ET

    "We are invested pretty heavily in a lot of large dividend paying stocks from around the globe, things that pay in the 6, 7 and 8 percent range, which is a great place to be right now. I'm not sure that I would want to be jumping into treasuries at this point," Randy Warren, chief investment officer at Warren Financial Services, told CNBC.

  • US Government Inadequate on Deficit     Tuesday, 9 Aug 2011 | 5:00 AM ET

    "The debacle in Congress in terms of coming to a deal really highlighted the US government's inadequacy in dealing with the deficit, perhaps a little bit earlier than the government wanted, certainly in terms of the election cycle," Sir Martin Sorrell, chief executive at WPP told CNBC

  • Federal Reserve Bank Chairman Ben Bernanke

    Following huge losses for the Dow on Monday and further selling in Asia overnight, the markets are watching what the Fed and Ben Bernanke will do at their July Meeting today. Speculation is mounting that the Fed will attempt to restore calm but one fund manager thinks that policy action is unnecessary.

  • S&P Downgrade Blamed for Market Fall-Off     Tuesday, 9 Aug 2011 | 2:00 AM ET

    "When a market sees a forced seller or a forced buyer, the prices will just gap away from them, and that has been going on since the US downgrade." Mark Tinker, global portfolio manager at Axa Framlington, told CNBC.

  • No Time to Panic, This Economy Can Hold Up Monday, 8 Aug 2011 | 4:52 PM ET

    During a period like this, with stocks plunging almost on a daily basis, it’s clear that fear and shock are ruling the roost. But fear can be overdone. As someone who has been around awhile and has seen many sell-offs, let me offer some advice: Do not panic. Market corrections come and go. They are not the end of the world. Most times they are actually healthy.

  • Farrell: Fed Is Out of Bullets Monday, 8 Aug 2011 | 3:25 PM ET
    Bernanke Testifies to Congress on U.S. Monetary Policy

    Ben cut interest rates to zero, devised a zillion bowls of "alphabet soup" rescue programs as the Wall Street Journal put it, and bought every bond put out for bid and ballooned the Fed's balance sheet by trillions. Maybe it saved us from disaster, but we haven't seen the growth expected.

  • Farrell: Pelosi Was Right Monday, 8 Aug 2011 | 1:54 PM ET
    Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during her weekly news conference at the US Capitol in Washington, DC.

    I hate to say it, but Nancy was right! I try to be apolitical. I think I succeed most of the time. Trashing both parties more or less equally allows me to stay balanced. So in that continuing effort to stay bland and uninteresting, I have to give mention to Nancy Pelosi who said a few weeks ago it might take a decline of hundreds of points in the market to get the Republicans attention.

  • The markets around the world are rattled silly this morning by the first ever downgrade of the U.S. Government’s debt by Standard & Poors.  That is understandable but not, in my mind, rational.

  • In the U.S., is it the fall of the Roman Empire or will our anemic growth pick up steam and help us out of the economic doldrums? Here are five questions to ask.

  • Farr: What the Markets Hate Most Monday, 8 Aug 2011 | 10:17 AM ET

    One of the first things investors learn after “buy low and sell high” is that markets hate uncertainty.

  • Farrell: The Downgrade Is a National Disgrace Monday, 8 Aug 2011 | 9:51 AM ET
    Barack Obama

    To be downgraded is a national disgrace. It comes about via a political battle that should never have been fought.

  • S&P Downgrade: No Surprise     Monday, 8 Aug 2011 | 6:10 AM ET

    "S&P have been signalling for some time that they were unhappy with the progress of the deficit, so in a sense it should not come as a surprise," William Rhodes, senior advisor at Citi and author of 'Banker to the World', told CNBC.

  • "Clearly the S&P downgrade is a disappointment, clearly the timing as well is disappointing but I don't think financial markets will be taken completely by surprise by this," Henry Dixon, fund manager at Matterley Asset Management told CNBC.

  • US Pride—More Than Stocks—Hurt by Downgrade Monday, 8 Aug 2011 | 4:30 AM ET
    Alan Greenspan

    The decision by Standard & Poor's to cut America's debt rating is, in Alan Greenspan’s view, bad for America’s state of mind.

  • "A one notch downgrade by a single agency doesn't force anybody to sell treasuries, it doesn't affect cash funds or money funds, so in the short term, the practical implication is pretty limited. It has been made pretty clear the US Federal Reserve will continue to accept US Treasury paper and US-guaranteed paper as collateral," Ewen Cameron Watt, chief investment strategist at BlackRock Investment Institute, told CNBC.

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.

    With S&P’s downgrade of the United States’ credit rating from AAA to AA, many are speculating on how markets and U.S. authorities will respond.

  • Barack Obama

    There he goes again. Out on the campaign trail, President Obama is proposing more federal spending as his answer to sluggish growth and jobs. That won’t do it, Mr. President.

  • Just imagine what would have happened to the markets if the debt ceiling wasn't raised. Yesterday, the equity markets fell off a small cliff and gave back the gains for the year. Today, we are watching the markets on a roller coaster ride as investors try to figure out what is really happening in the economy.

  • Rotblut: The Economy, Politicians and Market Timing Friday, 5 Aug 2011 | 9:57 AM ET

    If part of your investing strategy this year is based on the presidential cycle, you need to acknowledge that things are not going as planned. Streaks last until they don’t. Similarly, if your investing strategy is based on an economic recovery, you will need to acknowledge that growth has slowed.