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Homeland Security

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  • Twitter and Osama — The Flip Side Monday, 2 May 2011 | 12:57 PM ET
    Saudi-born alleged terror mastermind Osama bin Laden is seen in this video footage recorded at an undisclosed location in Afghanistan aired by the Qatar-based satelite TV station al-Jazeera in 2001.

    You'll hear a lot this week about Twitter's news value. However, I'm blogging about its flip side. If Twitter has changed the flow of information to us, it has also changed the flow of information from us. Never before have people had such a platform to react.

  • Busch: Bin Laden — What’s Next Is What Count Monday, 2 May 2011 | 12:29 PM ET

    Last night, President Obama went on air to announce the killing of the United States enemy number one, Osama Bin Laden.  Given this volatile and uncertain world we inhabit, how should we view this event? In the short run when it comes to terrorism, the best news is usually no news meaning no attacks.

  • A Personal Recollection     Monday, 2 May 2011 | 11:39 AM ET

    Sharing his loss and his personal views on Osama bin Laden's death, with John Duffy, KBW chairman/CEO.

  • Are We Safer Now?     Monday, 2 May 2011 | 11:31 AM ET

    The question remains as to whether we are safer now than we were yesterday. Insight with Rich Miniter, "Mastermind: The Many Faces of 9-11 Architect" author and Michael Balboni, former Obama Homeland Security advisor.

  • Divided Libya Looks 'Increasingly Likely' Tuesday, 22 Mar 2011 | 4:17 AM ET
    A Libyan jet bomber crashes after being shot down in Benghazi on March 19, 2011 as Libya's rebel stronghold came under attack, with at least two air strikes and sustained shelling of the city's south sending thick smoke into the sky.

    As anti-aircraft fire rang out across Tripoli for the third night in a row and US airstrikes yet to slow, one analyst told CNBC that there is a very real chance of Libya being divided between the Gaddafi-controlled West and rebel-controlled East.

  • Suspicious Bank Letter Was Greeting Card: NYPD Wednesday, 19 Jan 2011 | 12:53 PM ET

    New York City police say a suspicious letter sent to a midtown Manhattan bank turned out to be a greeting card from a headhunting firm.

  • Christmas Week Starts Off With Lump of Coal Monday, 20 Dec 2010 | 12:11 PM ET

    It's only Monday, and I'm thinking of calling in sick the rest of the week. Here are just a few of the headlines which greeted me this morning.

  • Trading Our WikiLeaks-Led Future Thursday, 16 Dec 2010 | 7:13 PM ET

    Here are the two best plays right now on cyber security.

  • At a Checkpoint, Terror Fears and Testy Travelers Tuesday, 23 Nov 2010 | 10:37 AM ET
    TSA Xray machines airport

    Behind an unmarked door, in a cluttered break room of half-eaten lunches and morale-boosting posters, a dozen Transportation Security Administration officers listened to their airport supervisor deliver another much-needed pep talk that contained the reminder: “I get paid to be paranoid, and so do you.” The New York Times reports.

  • Megan McArdle Bids Farewell to Airlines Thursday, 18 Nov 2010 | 4:15 PM ET

    The TSA full body scanners are the last straw. She's breaking up with air travel.

  • TSA Outrage — The Marketing Opportunity Thursday, 18 Nov 2010 | 12:33 PM ET
    A TSA officer demonstrates what the images form the Advanced Imaging Technology unit look like.

    I need to stop shaking my head over this whole TSA thing and start making some money. Others are way ahead of me.

  • In Defense of Airport Security Wednesday, 17 Nov 2010 | 10:53 AM ET
    A TSA officer demonstrates what the images form the Advanced Imaging Technology unit look like.

    New scanners allow TSA officers to basically see you naked, and there are concerns about radiation. Critics allege this is the worst kind of funny business.

  • Officials Defend Intimate Airport Security Methods Monday, 15 Nov 2010 | 8:46 AM ET

    Officials are defending new anti-terrorism security procedures at the nation's airports that some travelers complain are overly invasive and intimate.

  • White House Weighs Response to Mail Bomb Plot Monday, 1 Nov 2010 | 8:35 AM ET

    Teams of U.S. anti-terrorism and security experts are headed to Yemen to help search for suspects in the mail bomb plot and to train cargo screeners at the San'a airport.

  • China Telecom Giant Makes Push for US Market Tuesday, 26 Oct 2010 | 12:23 AM ET
    People visiting Huawei Technologies booth display of its product during CommunicAsia 2010 conference and exhibtion show in Singapore.

    As Chinese companies enter into more sophisticated businesses, security concerns make telecommunications a delicate industry in the United States. The NYT reports.

  • US Wants to Make It Easier to Wiretap the Internet Monday, 27 Sep 2010 | 8:59 AM ET

    Federal law enforcement and national security officials are preparing to seek sweeping new regulations for the Internet, arguing that their ability to wiretap criminal and terrorism suspects is “going dark” as people increasingly communicate online instead of by telephone.

  • While the rest of the world was watching BP and Europe this week, some U.S. lawmakers were working on a plan for a “kill switch” for the Internet.

  • NYPD Interviews Registered Owner of Car Bomb SUV Monday, 3 May 2010 | 3:26 PM ET
    Times Square bomb scare

    Investigators have spoken to the registered owner of a sport utility vehicle that contained a homemade bomb in the failed Times Square terrorist attack, but he is not considered a suspect, officials said Monday.

  • World's Top 10 Credit Card Issuers Tuesday, 13 Apr 2010 | 4:38 PM ET
    Since the first widely accepted plastic charge card was issued in 1958 by American Express, the use of credit cards has skyrocketed. In fact, at the end February, more than 576 million credit cards were in circulation* in the United States alone, with US consumers' revolving debt rising to $864.4 billion*** (98 percent of which is made up of credit card debt) as of January.The average American household with credit card debt at that time was carrying more than $16,000** at an average rate of 14.

    Since the first widely accepted plastic charge card was issued in 1958 by American Express, the use of credit cards has skyrocketed. Check out the world's top 10 credit card issuers.

  • Counterfeit Combat: Hardest Notes to Fake Tuesday, 30 Mar 2010 | 10:31 AM ET
    In the United States alone, there's an estimated $70 million in fake currency floating around. Fortunately, as the technology counterfeiters use improves, so does that of authentic bills. All across the globe, experts are devising high-tech methods to combat counterfeiters. Color-changing ink, special polymers and holographs are just some of the innovative technologies incorporated into today's banknotes. In 2007, the International Association of Currency Affairs began picking the best new count

    In the U.S. alone, there's an estimated $70 million in fake currency floating around. Click to see some of the world's currencies that are most impervious to fraud.