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Treasurys

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  • It's a Debt Ceiling, Not a Spending Ceiling! Friday, 29 Jul 2011 | 4:19 PM ET
    President Barack Obama

    Jeffrey Rosen has a good discussion of the likely way the justices on the Supreme Court would vote if Barack Obama decided to use the Fourteenth Amendment as a tool for violating the debt ceiling prohibitions on additional borrowing.

  • With the clock running out on the August 2 deadline to increase the debt ceiling, short-dated Treasury bill yields have gone up "fairly considerably over the course of the last week," Tad Rivelle, CIO for fixed income at TCW, told CNBC Friday.

  • Sen. Reid on Debt & Your Bond Strategy  Friday, 29 Jul 2011 | 12:15 PM ET

    Sen. Harry Reid says the new additions to the Boehner bill is hard to comprehend and The Strategy Session outlines your strategy for investing in Treasuries, with Tad Rivelle, TCW.

  • US Stocks 'No Place for Pros or Amateurs': Gartman Friday, 29 Jul 2011 | 4:45 AM ET
    House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) conducts his weekly news conference at the U.S. Capitol, on July 21, 2011 in Washington, DC.

    As Republicans failed to agree a plan to raise the US debt ceiling, Dennis Gartman, author of The Gartman Letter, warned that the US stock market was a dangerous place at the moment.

  • Time to Think the Unthinkable on US Debt Friday, 29 Jul 2011 | 3:23 AM ET
    President Obama and Speaker of the House Rep. John Boehner

    "The world’s financial system could face losses equivalent to that of Lehman’s failure by August 15, and then again on the fifteenth day and the last day of every month until default is rectified,” says one chief economist.

  • Debt Crisis, Buying Opportunity for the Chinese? Friday, 29 Jul 2011 | 1:44 AM ET

    As America’s largest foreign creditor, China has little option but to hope for the best and try to calm jittery markets in the event of a downgrade of US debt by the ratings agencies according to economists at Capital Economics.

  • The $1 Trillion Coin Solution to the Debt Ceiling Thursday, 28 Jul 2011 | 2:40 PM ET

    Yale’s constitutional law professor Jack Balkin has some innovative ideas about how to get around the debt ceiling.

  • Implications of a US Downgrade Thursday, 28 Jul 2011 | 10:04 AM ET

    It appears that politicians in Washington, D.C., are moving closer to a deal that would extend the ability of the government to borrow money beyond August—preventing a default on U.S. government bonds or other obligations.

  • The Debt Clock Ticks On  Thursday, 28 Jul 2011 | 10:03 AM ET

    America may lost is AAA rating. Insight on how investors should play the markets now, with Katherine Klingensmith, UBS Wealth Management Research Americas.

  • Market Correlations at 'Nosebleed Levels': Analyst Thursday, 28 Jul 2011 | 6:56 AM ET
    Close-up of a pen on stock price chart

    The current political turmoil may put technical levels for stocks at risk, Philippe Gijsels, the head of research at BNP Paribas Fortis Global Markets in Brussels, told CNBC.com in an interview Thursday.

  • If US Defaults, Stocks Fall 30%, GDP 5%: Credit Suisse Thursday, 28 Jul 2011 | 2:56 AM ET

    In the very unlikely event that the United States defaults on its debt obligations, the country's economy would contract by 5 percent and stocks would fall by nearly a third, according to Credit Suisse.

  • Asian Investors Wrestle With US Crisis Risk Wednesday, 27 Jul 2011 | 11:23 PM ET
    Traders sit at their desks at the Stock Exchange in Hong Kong.

    If Asia’s equity and bond markets are any guide, then investors seem pretty sanguine about the risks of the US Treasury running out of cash or the eurozone debt crisis spinning out of control. The FT reports.

  • The debt feud will likely continue to take its toll on markets Thursday, as the deadline to raise the debt ceiling closes in and lawmakers are still far apart.

  • Trades For a Stressed-Out Dollar Wednesday, 27 Jul 2011 | 4:38 PM ET

    Other than a short rally today, the dollar's been taking it on the chin as Washington squabbles. Here's how to trade it.

  • What a Downgrade Would Mean for the Dollar Wednesday, 27 Jul 2011 | 4:13 PM ET

    Even a debt deal may not prevent a rating cut for U.S. debt. Here's what it would mean for the dollar, and what you can do.

  • What Happens If the US Is Downgraded? Wednesday, 27 Jul 2011 | 3:59 PM ET
    Politicians in Washington, D.C. finally agreed on a deal that would extend the ability of the government to borrow money beyond August—preventing a default on  or other obligations.But even with the U.S. debt ceiling raised, a short-term deal that does little to raise revenue or cut spending might result in a downgrade of the country's long-term debt. Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s might decide that the failure to produce a longer-term solution to the U.S. debt burden indicates that the country's

    You might be surprised by some of the possible answers. Click ahead to see what happens if the U.S. credit rating is downgraded.

  • Paul Krugman

    There's been a lot of talk about how the Fed is caught in a liquidity trap, unable to use conventional monetary policy to stimulate the economy. The more I think about the possibility of the Treasury using its implicit overdraft facility with the Fed, the more apparent it is to me that Keynesians should love this.

  • An Interview With S&P's Global Head of Sovereign Ratings Wednesday, 27 Jul 2011 | 11:03 AM ET

    Last night, I spoke with David Beers, head of S&P's sovereign debt rating committee on CNBC’s Kudlow Report. He made it very clear: the U.S. must take steps to lower its debt/GDP trend over the long run.

  • Triple-A Rating: What the US Can Learn From Japan Wednesday, 27 Jul 2011 | 6:07 AM ET
    Japanese Flag

    Analysts at Barclays Capital expect the United States to lose its AAA credit rating as a compromise plan is passed by Congress that leads S&P to cut its rating on US debt.

  • If Tea Party Likes a Debt Deal, It Can't Pass: Economist Wednesday, 27 Jul 2011 | 3:40 AM ET
    U.S. Minority Leader Rep. John Boehner

    As the high risk-game of chicken over raising the US debt ceiling draws closer to possible economic collision, one economist is warning that any deal that wins approval from the right-wing Tea Party movement will pass neither the Senate nor the president.