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  • Grain lower, beef mixed and pork lower Tuesday, 29 Jul 2014 | 11:00 AM ET

    CHICAGO— Grain futures were lower Tuesday on the Chicago Board of Trade. Wheat for Sept delivery was 14.75 cents lower at $5.20 a bushel; Sept corn was 6.25 cents lower at 3.6150 a bushel; Dec oats were 4.25 cents lower at $3.3325 a bushel; while Nov soybeans declined 12.75 cents to $10.95 a bushel.

  • Big lobbying dollars flow in engineered food fight Tuesday, 29 Jul 2014 | 4:29 AM ET
    A researcher takes tissue samples from genetically modified corn plants.

    The way consumers would be informed when their food has been genetically engineered is being battled in Congress and among advocacy groups.

  • Expect your coconut water to get more expensive Monday, 28 Jul 2014 | 7:04 PM ET

    The Philippines' already vulnerable coconut trees took a hit from the past year's typhoons even as demand for trendy coconut-based products is rising.

  • *Soybeans supported by strong demand led by China. Wheat futures were lower but trimmed losses in the wake of a U.S. Agriculture Department announcement showing a wheat sale to Nigeria and a soybean sale to top importer China.

  • Bumper crop of Ohio corn drives down prices Monday, 28 Jul 2014 | 7:08 AM ET

    DAYTON, Ohio— Ohio's bumper crop of corn this year means lower prices at the supermarket and vegetable stands. Per-bushel corn prices have dropped 38 percent since last July, John Miyares, a statistician with the National Agricultural Statistics Service's Great Lakes Regional Field Office, told The Dayton Daily News.

  • Incubator farms nurture agriculture entrepreneurs Saturday, 26 Jul 2014 | 12:41 PM ET

    ITHACA, N.Y.— A physicist from Armenia, a juice-maker from Bermuda and a Burmese sushi chef are crafting new careers in agriculture under a program that applies the business incubator model to farming.

  • Correction: Rural Investment Dollars story Friday, 25 Jul 2014 | 5:06 PM ET

    WASHINGTON— In a story July 24 about a new rural investment fund announced by the White House, The Associated Press reported erroneously that Colorado- based CoBank is donating $10 billion to a fund for rural investment projects.

  • NEW YORK, July 25- Uncertainty over a policy shift to crop subsidies in China, the world's top producer and consumer of cotton, could spark a burst of demand for imported cotton between September and December, an industry veteran said on Friday.

  • Grain mostly higher, beef and pork higher Friday, 25 Jul 2014 | 10:57 AM ET

    CHICAGO— Grain futures were mosly higher Friday on the Chicago Board of Trade. Wheat for Sept delivery was 9.25 cents higher at $5.38 a bushel; Sept corn was 1.50 cents higher at 3.63 a bushel; Dec oats were 6.50 cents higher at $3.325 a bushel; while Nov soybeans were 1.25 cents lower at $10.835 a bushel.

  • Groundwater levels plunge as southwest slurps up Friday, 25 Jul 2014 | 8:40 AM ET
    Mineral-stained rocks on the upstream side of the Hoover Dam are seen at the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Arizona.

    The data comes as policymakers wrestle over how to manage the use of groundwater, often farmers' last resort, NBC News reports.

  • Don't believe the hype—a kale crisis is bunk Thursday, 24 Jul 2014 | 2:55 PM ET
    Northern Spy Food Co.’s kale salad.

    Recent stories reported a coming worldwide kale shortage due to an absence of seeds at Australia's Bejos Seeds. The truth is something else.

  • Grain mixed, livestock mostly lower Thursday, 24 Jul 2014 | 10:54 AM ET

    CHICAGO— Grain futures were mixed Thursday in early trading on the Chicago Board of Trade. Wheat for Sept delivery was unchanged at $5.3075 a bushel; Sept corn was 4.5 cents lower at $3.58 a bushel; Dec oats were unchanged at $3.2425 a bushel; while Nov soybeans were 8.5 cents higher at $10.85 a bushel.

  • Net earnings for the world's biggest fertilizer company by market capitalization fell to $472 million, or 56 cents per share, from $643 million, or 73 cents per share, a year earlier. Potash Corp had forecast 40 cents to 45 cents. Potash Corp raised its estimate of 2014 earnings to a range of $1.70 to $1.90 per share from a prior forecast of $1.50 to $1.80.

  • Farm bank donates $10 billion for rural projects Thursday, 24 Jul 2014 | 12:02 AM ET

    WASHINGTON— A bank that serves farmers and agribusiness is donating $10 billion to spur private investment in rural America. The White House was announcing the money Thursday as part of a rural conference it is holding this week.

  • Soybeans bounce off lowest prices since 2010 Wednesday, 23 Jul 2014 | 3:57 PM ET

    Soybeans rose 19 cents to settle at $10.77 a bushel. Wheat rose 6 cents to $5.31 a bushel and corn added 3 cents to $3.71 a bushel. Mike Zuzolo, president of Global Commodity Analytics, said those forecasts helped nudge prices up Wednesday because many farmers planted their soybeans late in the season, which makes them more susceptible to changing weather.

  • July 23- Dow Chemical Co reported a better-than-expected quarterly profit as sales rose and margins improved due to higher prices and a tight control on costs.

  • CHICAGO, July 23- As U.S. farmers turn in record grain crops this autumn, many will have a powerful new tool- giant sausage-shaped storage bags- to help them avoid the lowest prices in years and gain more control over trade with giants such as Cargill Inc..

  • These are the markets that Marc Faber likes     Tuesday, 22 Jul 2014 | 8:48 PM ET

    Marc Faber, Publisher, The Gloom, Boom & Doom Report, explains why he thinks the agriculture sector is a good place for investments.

  • Corn extends slump; grain price at four-year low Tuesday, 22 Jul 2014 | 3:44 PM ET

    Corn for delivery in September dropped 3.75 cents, or 1 percent, to $3.68 a bushel on Tuesday. "The weather conditions are beyond good," said Sterling Smith, a commodities analyst at Citigroup. Soybeans for the same month dropped 13.75 cents, or 1.3 percent, to $10.58 a bushel.

  • July 22- DuPont, the world's second-largest seed maker, said its agriculture business would not improve in the current quarter as it struggles to cope with farmers' preference for soybean rather than corn, the mainstay of the business.