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Copyrights

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  • The Village People, circe 1981

    In a court ruling with significant implications for the music industry, a California judge has dismissed a suit by two song publishing companies aimed at preventing Victor Willis, former lead singer of the 1970s disco group the Village People, from exercising his right to reclaim ownership of “YMCA” and other hit songs he wrote, the New York Times reports.

  • Shepard Fairey, the creator of the Barack Obama "HOPE" poster.

    The creator of the Obama "HOPE" poster pleads guilty  to contempt for destroying documents in a lawsuit pertaining to the photograph he relied upon to make the poster.

  • Website Blackout: PIPA & SOPA Showdown  Wednesday, 18 Jan 2012 | 7:52 PM ET

    Debating whether the anti-piracy bills in Congress will curtail the hijacking of online intellectual property, or give media companies too much power to shut down internet sites, with Rep. Marsha Blackburn, (R-TN), and Gary Shapiro, Consumer Electronics Association CEO.

  • A Start-Up Takes on Procter & Gamble Over a Name Thursday, 29 Sep 2011 | 10:42 AM ET
    Shoppers check out at a newly-opened Target store near Royersford, Pa., on Monday, Nov. 13, 2006. Discount retailer Target Corp. said Tuesday its third-quarter profit rose 16 percent, beating analyst expectations as its sales rose 11 percent. (AP Photo/George Widman)

    When Procter & Gamble challenged Christy Prunier's name Willa for a line of skin care products for preteenagers, Prunier chose to fight. The case goes to court next month, the New York Times reports.

  • A Village Person Tests the Copyright Law Wednesday, 17 Aug 2011 | 11:13 AM ET
    The Village People perform on stage at the taping of the American Bandstand.

    The prefab, gaudily costumed 1970s group the Village People and its big hit “Y.M.C.A.” are enduring symbols of the disco era. But now this campy and eternally popular song has become the centerpiece of what could be a significant test of copyright law. The New York Times reports.

  • Enforcing Copyrights Online, for a Profit Tuesday, 3 May 2011 | 8:49 AM ET
    Woman using laptop in internet cafe

    Righthaven, a Nevada company, finds newspaper material that has been republished on the Web and obtains the copyrights. Then it sues, the New York Times reports.