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  • ECB Faces 'Skeleton' Risk Due to Collateral: Report Monday, 23 May 2011 | 12:34 AM ET

    The European Central Bank is facing a potential crisis of its own because of "skeleton" risks amounting to several hundreds of billions of euros on its balance sheet, Dow Jones reported quoting Der Spiegel magazine.

  • The Currency Trade Behind Greece's Woes Sunday, 22 May 2011 | 6:29 PM ET

    Are you itching to try your hand at trading the euro, given all the news about sovereign debt risk and upheaval at the IMF?

  • Money In Motion Web Extra     Friday, 20 May 2011 | 5:59 PM ET

    Web-only advice and information for currency traders, with CNBC's Melissa Lee and the Money In Motion traders.

  • The Buck Stops Here     Friday, 20 May 2011 | 5:58 PM ET

    The final word from the currency pits, with CNBC's Melissa Lee and the Money In Motion traders.

  • Money In Motion, May 20, 2011     Friday, 20 May 2011 | 5:30 PM ET

    A detailed look at currency trading, with CNBC's Melissa Lee and the Money In Motion traders.

  • Money Match Up: Greece & Commodities     Friday, 20 May 2011 | 5:30 PM ET

    Greece creeps closer to default. Is there a currency trade behind the country's woes, with CNBC's Melissa Lee and the Money In Motion traders. Also, cold cash and hot commodities--using currencies to play the recent pullback in commodities, with Dennis Gartman, The Gartman Letter.

  • A 'Soft' Restructuring for Greece? Friday, 20 May 2011 | 4:40 PM ET
    Euro coins

    We often get a frenzy of negative Europe speculation on a Friday afternoon either from fear of what might emerge over the weekend or mischief-making by Dollar-bulls. And today is no exception.

  • Flurry of Worry About Greece Drives Euro Lower Friday, 20 May 2011 | 4:06 PM ET
    Euro coins

    Worry about Greece's debt struggles, Spanish elections and a Bundesbank warning on German growth combined to drive the euro lower, and put investors on alert ahead of the weekend.

  • Fix the IMF: Go for Growth — End Bailout Nation Friday, 20 May 2011 | 10:11 AM ET
    International Monetary Fund chief, Dominique Strauss-Kahn, is placed in the backseat of a police vehicle outside of a New York City Police Department facility in New York City.

    As the IMF gets ready to choose a successor to Dominique Strauss-Kahn, who resigned following his arrest on charges that he sexually assaulted and raped a hotel housekeeper, it would be a good thing to step back for a moment and ask: What should the IMF do?

  • Strauss-Kahn to Leave Rikers     Friday, 20 May 2011 | 9:00 AM ET

    IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn is expected to leave Rikers today, reports CNBC's Mary Thompson.

  • Fighting Inflation a Challenge: ECB Board Member Friday, 20 May 2011 | 4:55 AM ET

    Fighting inflation in times when commodity prices increase is part of the future challenges the European Central Bank (ECB) will have to face, Gertrude Tumpel-Gugerell, executive board member of the ECB, said in an exclusive interview with CNBC Friday.

  • Business Barometer Shows Brightening Outlook Friday, 20 May 2011 | 1:38 AM ET
    Trader at London Stock Exchange, England.

    Twice as many business leaders say that the world economy is going to improve in the next six months than think it is going to get worse, according to the FT/Economist global business barometer.

  • Britain's Inflation Nightmare Becomes Worse Friday, 20 May 2011 | 1:23 AM ET

    If the monetary policy committee of the Bank of England were paid a performance bonus, its members would deserve nothing. The UK’s inflation outcome has been far from target over a long period. So should the MPC raise rates now to make up for its past failures? No. But its position is becoming very uncomfortable, according to the FT.

  • Time for IMF to Get Tought on Europe?     Thursday, 19 May 2011 | 11:13 AM ET

    Discussing whether the IMF should change gears by putting an American in charge and getting tough on Europe regarding its debt, with Eswar Prasad, Brookings Institution; CNBC's Eamon Javers, Mary Thompson, and Steve Liesman.

  • A Favorite Emerges for Helm of IMF Thursday, 19 May 2011 | 7:01 AM ET
    French Finance Minister Christine Lagarde is considered the top contender to replace Strauss-Kahn as IMF chief.

    The French finance minister, Christine Lagarde, was on a panel at the World Economic Forum in Davos this January when her usual smile turned into a frown. Next to her, Robert E. Diamond Jr., chief executive of Barclays and one of the most powerful bankers in the world, thanked regulators and finance ministers for their role in shaping a better environment after the financial crisis.

  • Merkel Says European Should Replace Strauss-Kahn Thursday, 19 May 2011 | 6:46 AM ET

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel reiterated on Thursday that she wanted a European to become the next IMF chief and that Dominique Strauss-Kahn's exit before the end of his term was an argument in favour of such a move.

  • Just 20 Percent Back Greek Austerity: Poll Thursday, 19 May 2011 | 2:38 AM ET
    The Parthenon in Greece

    Just 20 percent of the Greek electorate believe the country should abide by the terms of the European Union/International Monetary Fund loan agreement and pay off all its debts, according to a poll in a Greek newspaper.

  • Greece Deficit and UK's Market Reaction     Wednesday, 18 May 2011 | 6:13 AM ET

    The IMF's mission chief in Athens makes comments today on Greece's debt. Insight on how the markets will react, with CNBC's Ross Westgate and Carolin Schober.

  • The Euro Zone After Strauss Kahn Wednesday, 18 May 2011 | 12:17 AM ET
    IMF head Dominique Strauss-Kahn

    The sight of Dominique Strauss-Kahn, managing director of the International Monetary Fund and prospective candidate for the French presidency, doing the "perp walk" was stupefying. If the charges are true, this capable man is a lunatic. But, unless the case collapses, the event will cast a long shadow, according to the FT.

  • Russia: Undervalued BRIC or Major Risk? Tuesday, 17 May 2011 | 12:36 AM ET
    Russia

    Following huge losses for the Russian market in 2008, investors have eyed stocks in Moscow skeptically and refused to give them the same rating as those in other BRIC members, Brazil, India and China according to Roland Nash, the chief investment strategist at Verno Capital.