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  • Ireland Will Have V-Shape Recovery: Wilbur Ross Monday, 28 Feb 2011 | 11:20 AM ET

    After announcing a deal with the Irish government to buy the country’s largest savings bank, legendary investor Wilbur Ross, chairman and CEO of W.L. Ross & Co., told CNBC Monday that the European nation will have a V-shape recovery.

  • The dollar is continuing its slide and euro buyers are emerging, drawn by hopes for relatively attractive yields - but how long before Portugal needs a bailout? Your daily FX Fix, right here.

  • Irish Voters Set to Take Revenge on Ruling Party Friday, 25 Feb 2011 | 6:23 AM ET
    protestors irish prime ministers office

    Ireland goes to the polls on Friday in a general election expected to sweep the ruling coalition from power – the first defeat for a eurozone government since the onset of the debt crisis.

  • Hoping to Lead Bank, Italian Faces Hurdles Friday, 25 Feb 2011 | 5:48 AM ET
    European Central Bank

    Many economists think he should be the next person to run the European Central Bank. But among government leaders in Berlin and Paris, where many of Europe’s most important decisions are made, Mario Draghi, the governor of the Bank of Italy, generates a palpable lack of enthusiasm, reports the New York Times.

  • European Stocks to Open Higher as Oil Price Falls Friday, 25 Feb 2011 | 2:04 AM ET
    A stock broker sits in front of a board displaying German share index DAX at the stock exchange in Frankfurt/M., western Germany.

    European shares were set to edge up on Friday, snapping five straight sessions of falls, after a retreat in crude prices.

  • European Shares Seen Opening Down as Oil Surges Thursday, 24 Feb 2011 | 2:08 AM ET
    A trader sits in front of a board displaying Germany's share index DAX at the stock exchange in Frankfurt/Munich, western Germany.

    European stocks were seen inching lower on Thursday, adding to this week's sell-off as mounting worries over unrest in Lybia sent U.S. crude oil futures above $100 a barrel.

  • European Markets Fall on Oil Fears Wednesday, 23 Feb 2011 | 12:07 PM ET

    Traders tell me stock markets are down in Europe today over fears about how its world class exporters could be hit by rising oil prices, specifically in emerging markets.

  • The Swiss Franc Is Hot, The Dollar Is Not Wednesday, 23 Feb 2011 | 9:47 AM ET

    Switzerland spells safety - for now - and the European Central Bank is scolding political leaders. Here's your daily FX Fix.

  • All In All, A Good Day For A Safe Haven Or Two Tuesday, 22 Feb 2011 | 8:53 AM ET

    Libyan unrest is boosting the dollar, and a European Central Bank hawk is helping the euro. Here's your daily FX Fix.

  • European Shares To Open Lower on Libya Worries Tuesday, 22 Feb 2011 | 2:03 AM ET
    Traders sit in front of their screens at the stock exchange in Frankfurt/Munich, western Germany.

    European shares are set to fall on Tuesday as concerns grow over the political unrest in Libya and Asian stock markets tumbled.

  • Will the Euro Crisis Strike Back? Monday, 21 Feb 2011 | 8:07 AM ET

    If previous EU responses to the euro crisis are any guide, investors should not be expecting a highly-coordinated, shock-and-awe approach like those we have seen from the US authorities.

  • A new law devised to help Greece crack down on tax cheats is only one of the many efforts Greek authorities have made over the past year to change what has long been a way of life in this country — rampant tax evasion. But so far, to little avail. The New York Times reports.

  • Ireland's Leading Party Wants New Bailout Terms Monday, 21 Feb 2011 | 6:09 AM ET
    protestors irish prime ministers office

    The leading party in Ireland's national election campaign wants to spread the pain from the nation's bank collapse to investors in bank bonds.

  • Why Europe's Banks Are on a Borrowing Binge Friday, 18 Feb 2011 | 3:24 PM ET
    Euro bills

    Traders point to the fact that there is no sign that Europe’s credit markets are beginning to seize up as they did last spring, with banks worrying about each other’s counter-party risk. That’s evident from the fact that there is no spike in LIBOR, the interest rate at which banks borrow unsecured cash from each other on London's wholesale market.

  • Can the Rally Continue?     Friday, 18 Feb 2011 | 11:00 AM ET

    As Bernanke faces heat over his policies, which some believe is causing inflation around the world, investors wonder whether the rally will continue, with David Katz, Matrix Asset Advisors; Barry Knapp, Barclays. and CNBC's Guy Johnson.

  • A mystery is brewing at the European Central Bank, and China is getting some indirect heat. Here's your FXFix for Friday.

  • Emergency ECB Lending Remains Elevated Friday, 18 Feb 2011 | 7:07 AM ET
    European Central Bank

    Demand for emergency loans from the European Central Bank has stayed at unusually high levels for a second day in a row.  The FT reports.

  • Egyptians Say Military Discourages an Open Economy Friday, 18 Feb 2011 | 4:48 AM ET
    Marchers shake hands with Egyptian Army soldiers on tanks during a demonstration against President Hosni Mubarek in Tahrir Square January 29, 2010 in Cairo, Egypt. Egytian soldiers were for the most part interacting peacefully with the marchers in Tahrir Square during the afternoon hours.

    The Egyptian military defends the country, but it also runs day care centers and beach resorts.  Since the ouster last week of President Hosni Mubarak, of course, the military also runs the government. And some say it has already begun taking steps to protect the privileges of its gated economy, reports the New York Times.

  • Some Spanish Savings Banks Want More Time to Recover Friday, 18 Feb 2011 | 4:08 AM ET
    Spain

    Spanish savings banks, which have been ordered to raise more capital by the government, are facing an uphill struggle to persuade investors to help them improve their balance sheets, reports the New York Times.

  • For Germany’s Banks, a Grim Future Thursday, 17 Feb 2011 | 4:49 AM ET
    Global Credit Crisis

    The woes of WestLB, which has received $11 billion in taxpayer support since 2009, are symptomatic of a larger problem in the German economy. Many of its biggest banks are still on government life support after making bad lending bets during the bubble years. The New York Times reports.