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European Central Bank

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  • Crescenzi: Message of the Money Market Tuesday, 3 Aug 2010 | 10:47 AM ET

    For weeks, the money market correctly signaled a reduction in worry about the global banking system, continuing to act more like a liquidity market than a credit market ahead of the release of Europe's stress test results a week ago Friday and in its aftermath. If there's one place worries about banks will show up it is in the money market, where inter-bank rates are set.

  • Hungary Blames Its Central Bank for a Fiscal Crisis Tuesday, 3 Aug 2010 | 9:23 AM ET
    Budapest, Hungary

    The governor of the Hungarian Central Bank has it worse than most. Not only has the new government placed the blame on him, among others, for Hungary's stagnant economy, it has slashed his salary by 75 percent. The NYT reports.

  • Fed Printing May Create 'Final Crisis': Marc Faber Tuesday, 3 Aug 2010 | 5:50 AM ET
    Sheet of US one hundred dollar bills

    The Federal Reserve will create a "final crisis" by continuing to print money because it is underestimating the strength of the economy, Marc Faber, the author of "The Gloom, Boom and Doom Report," told CNBC Tuesday.

  • Deflation in the US? This is Not Japan: Economist Monday, 2 Aug 2010 | 10:04 AM ET

    We think there are meaningful differences between the US today and Japan during the '90s. High on our list is the difference in wages. A straight forward construct of inflation reveals employee earnings are a primary driver. During the early part of the 1990s wages in Japan were averaging around 2.0%.

  • West Is Halfway Through 20-Year Decline: Chartist Monday, 2 Aug 2010 | 8:56 AM ET

    The West is only half the way through a 20-year secular downturn that will not end until the children of the US baby boomers begin to flex their financial muscle in about 10 years time, according to Robin Griffiths, a technical strategist at Cazenove Capital.

  • European Bank Stress Tests Worked: Sort Of Saturday, 31 Jul 2010 | 12:20 PM ET
    Map of Europe

    A week after the authorities released results of stress tests on the largest European banks, market data is starting to provide an indication of whether the exercise had the desired effect on confidence. The answer: sort of. The NYT explains.

  • James Bullard

    Allowing the Bush tax cuts to expire would be a mistake with the economy trying to grow, James Bullard, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, told CNBC Friday.

  • Fear Cheap Money, Not Double Dip: Morgan Stanley Thursday, 29 Jul 2010 | 5:25 AM ET
    United States Federal Reserve

    Fears over a double-dip recession for the global economy are waning, but investors should be more worried about ultra-loose policy from the Federal Reserve, according to Joachim Fels, the co-head of economics at Morgan Stanley.

  • Gartman Slams Europe's 'Untoward' Tax Decision Wednesday, 28 Jul 2010 | 4:06 AM ET
    european_union_200.jpg

    Europe has chosen the wrong way to cut debt and unfortunately the United States will follow, Dennis Gartman, author and publisher of the Gartman Letter, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • Investors Drawn to Rallying European Banks Tuesday, 27 Jul 2010 | 3:51 PM ET

    Does the price action on major banks in Europe tell investors that the continent is now not a threat to risk appetite and that Wall Street can mount a sustained rally without a repeat of May’s negative blow-up?

  • Farrell: Getting Stressed Over Europe's Stress Test Monday, 26 Jul 2010 | 10:44 AM ET

    No way only 7 of 91 European banks could pass a real stress test. No way could only €3.5 billion in new capital be needed. When the US tested 19 banks a little while ago, 10 were found to be deficient, and $75 billion in new capital had to be raised. It's ok if everyone at MIT passes every test.

  • Yoshikami: Stress Tests? No Not Really Monday, 26 Jul 2010 | 9:52 AM ET
    The European Debt Crisis - See Complete Coverage

    After a highly anticipated week of leaks and rumors over how many, and which banks, will pass or fail the "stress test", the results are in. Only seven of 91 European banks flunked. Such a surprise... well, not really.

  • Roubini: EU Stress Tests Criteria Not Realistic Monday, 26 Jul 2010 | 8:03 AM ET
    Nouriel Roubini

    The pan-European stress tests on the banking sector were not tough enough to reflect future worsening conditions for the continent's economy, Nouriel Roubini told CNBC.com.

  • Jim Rogers: Stress Test Is a PR Exercise Monday, 26 Jul 2010 | 6:01 AM ET
    Jim Rogers

    "There are more problems coming in the currency markets, pension funds, US states and cities, etc. None of this was considered although the latter is only indirect for the European banks," the famous investor told CNBC.com.

  • EU Stress Tests Are a Missed Opportunity: Strategist Monday, 26 Jul 2010 | 3:21 AM ET
    cash_in_icecube_200x147.jpg

    One analyst says governments and regulators have missed a major opportunity that will come back to haunt them, even though European stocks advanced Monday on relief over results.

  • NYSE_building_ticker_200.jpg

    With the European bank stress tests out of the way, investors may shift their focus to what's got the stock market perking up in the last couple of days.

  • Investors Can Toughen Bank Stress Tests: CEBS Head Friday, 23 Jul 2010 | 4:19 PM ET
    bank_vault_200.jpg

    The results of pan-European stress tests released by the Committee of European Banking Supervisors (CEBS) are detailed enough for investors to work out for themselves losses that banks might incur in case of sovereign defaults if they wish, CEBS chairman Giovanni Carosio told CNBC in an interview Friday.

  • Seven Banks Fail Stress Tests Friday, 23 Jul 2010 | 1:38 PM ET
    european_flags_200.jpg

    Seven of 91 European banks failed stress tests aimed at measuring their strength in case the continent's government debt crisis takes a turn for the worse, regulators said Friday. European Union officials hope the results will reassure markets worried about hidden bank losses from the crisis.

  • Map of Europe

    Most of the largest European banks, are well capitalized but these results "can't begin to tell the full story," Cohen said.

  • Markets Worry Stress Tests Too Easy on Sovereign Debt Friday, 23 Jul 2010 | 12:17 PM ET

    All but a handful of European banks passed their stress tests but investors remained worried about the methodology, which many viewed as too easy on sovereign debt.