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European Central Bank

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  • Baccardax: The Real Nationalized Banks Monday, 9 Mar 2009 | 9:36 AM ET
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    Acres of forest have gone to the blade while the mainstream media has debated the issue of bank nationalization, but few if any seem to be prepared to address what seems obvious: the most important banks are already under government control.

  • Central banks' efforts to introduce measures such as buying various assets and printing money as they bring their interest rates to zero will not work in countries with too high levels of debt, Hugh Hendry, Chief Investment Officer at Eclectica, told CNBC.

  • Global Interest Rates Drop, US Dollar Rises Thursday, 5 Mar 2009 | 10:40 AM ET

    The Bank of England and European Central Bank slashed their interest rates to record lows today in an effort to bolster access to credit and contain the impact of a deepening recession.

  • Data on Banks' Exposure to E. Europe 'Inaccurate': Erste Wednesday, 4 Mar 2009 | 12:07 PM ET
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    The figure of $1.3 trillion for the exposure of Western banks to the Central and Eastern European region reported by the Bank for International Settlements is too high, Andreas Treichl, CEO of Erste Bank, one of the biggest banks operating in CEE, told CNBC Wednesday.

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    The leaders of the European Union gathered Sunday in Brussels in an emergency summit meeting that seemed to highlight the very worries it was designed to calm: that the world economic crisis has unleashed forces threatening to split Europe into rival camps. The New York Times reports.

  • UK Banks Should be Regulated by Europe: Ifo President Wednesday, 25 Feb 2009 | 11:15 AM ET

    UK banks are guilty of manipulating the country’s loose regulations to undercut their European competitors and should be regulated by a pan-European body, Hans-Werner Sinn, president of the Ifo Institute for Economic Research, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • As it Falters, Eastern Europe Raises Risks Tuesday, 24 Feb 2009 | 8:02 AM ET
    Map of Europe

    The development boom that turned Poland, Hungary and other former Soviet satellites into some of Europe’s hottest markets is on the verge of going bust, raising worrisome new risks for the global financial system that may ricochet back to the United States.

  • Dr. Doom: Nationalizing Banks is 'Market Friendly' Tuesday, 24 Feb 2009 | 6:31 AM ET
    Credit Crisis

    Nationalizing insolvent US banks is the best solution to avoid a Japan-like scenario in which 'zombie' financial institutions would eat up public resources while the US economy would teeter on the brink of depression, Nouriel Roubini, economics professor at NYU and chairman at RGE Monitor told CNBC Tuesday.

  • Europe Will be the Next Japan: Barings CIO Thursday, 19 Feb 2009 | 4:17 AM ET
    Map of Europe

    The scale of Europe’s recession could be as bad as the decade-long slump suffered by Japan during the 1990s, Marino Valensise, chief investment officer of Barings, told CNBC.com.

  • Government Bonds May Be Last Bubble: Jim Rogers Tuesday, 10 Feb 2009 | 5:59 AM ET

    Investors will have to short government bonds at some point despite their current attraction, as the amount of debt issued is "staggering" and inflation risks are down the road, Jim Rogers, CEO of Jim Rogers Holdings, told CNBC Tuesday.

  • Pros Say: Buffett's Long-Term Strategy Will Pay Off Friday, 6 Feb 2009 | 5:56 AM ET

    Billionaire investor Warren Buffett has led the charge into the battered stock market of late by making large acquisitions at a time when most investors are fiercely protecting their cash. One analyst told CNBC that even though he is suffering some heavy losses in the short term, the strategy will pay off.

  • US Inflation Could Hit 200%: Dr. Doom Friday, 6 Feb 2009 | 3:28 AM ET

    The Fed could cause Zimbabwe-like inflation making the US a 'banana republic,' famous bear Marc Faber said.

  • Stocks Rise as Bank Hopes Gain Traction Thursday, 5 Feb 2009 | 4:52 PM ET

    Stocks eked out a gain after a rough morning as banks got a boost from market chatter that the government may suspend a controversial accounting rule blamed for much of the contagion in the financial industry.

  • Pros Say: Executive Pay Caps are Bad Wednesday, 4 Feb 2009 | 6:43 AM ET

    Top executives at companies taking government money from the TARP will likely see their pay slips capped at $500,000 under a new initiative to be announced Wednesday by President Barack Obama. But one analyst told CNBC that the move could have a negative effect.  

  • Stocks Could Drop 20%, No Safe Haven: Dr. Doom Wednesday, 28 Jan 2009 | 5:18 AM ET
    Nouriel Roubini, RGE Monitor

    US and global stocks are still likely to fall because the corporate and economic news will be worse than expected, Nouriel Roubini, RGE Monitor Chairman, told CNBC in Davos.

  • They've Got an Uphill Battle Monday, 26 Jan 2009 | 7:41 PM ET

    The theme for the World Economic Forum this year is "Restoring Trust, Rebuilding Confidence." It ain't gonna be an easy sell.

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    US President Barack Obama won't be there, but many other major world leaders will be on hand, and policy experts say they'll have to do more than just show up if they want to jumpstart the global economy.

  • At Davos, Crisis Culls the Guest List Monday, 26 Jan 2009 | 9:37 AM ET
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    This year, politicians, not corporate titans, are poised to be the big draw, echoing the broader power shift away from the free market as one government after another tries to prop up its sinking economy.

  • Baccardax: Bonds Are Still a Screaming Buy Monday, 26 Jan 2009 | 9:03 AM ET
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    The recent lull in the government bond market's bullish tone only enhances the arguments for ramping-up a portfolio of the heretofore dullards of the financial markets.

  • The Euro Won't Be around in 20 Years: Jim Rogers Monday, 26 Jan 2009 | 3:24 AM ET

    The euro will not be around in the next 20 years, but Britain would have been better off had it joined the single European currency when it had a chance, legendary investor Jim Rogers told a British newspaper.