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  • Stocks Gain for Week Amid Glimmers of Hope Friday, 1 May 2009 | 5:44 PM ET

    Stocks eked out a gain after a rocky session Friday as investors weighed some encouraging economic reports against gloomy earnings.

  • Passerby's in front of the New York Stock Exchange.

    Uncertainty over bank stress testing and the billions in loan losses the institutions will have to cover poses a threat to the stock market rally.

  • Pros Say: Bank Stress Tests Will Be 'Positive' Friday, 1 May 2009 | 4:29 PM ET

    The stock market got a boost from economic reports on Friday that showed an increase in consumer confidence and improvement in the manufacturing numbers. Analysts and investors await results of the "stress tests" conducted on the nation's 19 biggest financial institutions, which will be released late Thursday afternoon next week. Find out what the experts had to say...

  • Unemployed Professionals Apply for 'Summer Jobs' Friday, 1 May 2009 | 3:39 PM ET
    Unemployment Line

    This summer, the guy running the Tilt-A-Whirl at the beach might be a laid-off, middle-aged accountant instead of the usual bored teenager. And the towel boy at the pool might be from East Providence instead of Eastern Europe.

  • Wall Street Economist: Recession to End at Mid Year Friday, 1 May 2009 | 2:41 PM ET

    Here's a green shoot for the first day of May. After months of growing gloom, a Wall Street economist actually changed his GDP outlook for the better.

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.

    The Federal Reserve announced Friday that it will launch a much-awaited program in June to bolster commercial real-estate lending. And, to help make the program more attractive to investors, the Fed will provide longer, five-year loans

  • Stocks Wobble as Confidence Boost Fades Friday, 1 May 2009 | 12:01 PM ET

    Stocks had a wobbly start to the morning Friday as investors weighed some encouraging economic reports against gloomy earnings.

  • Farr: How High Can We Go? Friday, 1 May 2009 | 11:12 AM ET

    The market continues its relentless climb higher. Since its closing low on March 9, 2009, the S&P 500 is up 29% and appears to be heading even higher today. The index is up 9.5% so far for the month of April - the best monthly performance since March, 2000....For my part, I remain concerned.

  • Tony Fratto: "The Obully Pulpit" Friday, 1 May 2009 | 10:19 AM ET

    left/CNBC/Sections/News_And_Analysis/_Blogs/Guest_Blog/__COVER/fratto_t_100_2.jpg1100100010lefttruehttp://msnbcmedia.msn.comfalse1Pfalsefalse "In announcing the Chrysler bankruptcy, President Obama launched a broadside attack on creditors who declined to buckle under White House pressure to cut a bad deal," writes Tony Fratto former Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy Press Secretary for the Bush Administration.

  • Stocks Pare Losses as Confidence Soars Friday, 1 May 2009 | 10:09 AM ET

    Stocks pared their losses Friday after economic reports showed consumer confidence soared to its highest level since before the fall downturn began and that manufacturing is showing signs of improvement.

  • Futures Higher But MasterCard Limits Gains Friday, 1 May 2009 | 8:44 AM ET

    Futures indicated a slightly higher open for U.S. stocks Friday as investors shrugged off Chrysler's bankruptcy announcement and decided to go against the 'sell in May and go away' mantra after April's successful performance.

  • Economists Plead for Lower Euro Rates Friday, 1 May 2009 | 8:18 AM ET

    The European Central Bank Shadow Council said it saw no need to set an interest rate floor at 1 percent, smashing official ECB proposals to prevent the rate from reaching 0 percent.

  • Pros Say: No Fat Lady Singing for this Rally Friday, 1 May 2009 | 7:55 AM ET

    Global stocks were higher Friday, the first day of May, as investors were encouraged by the returns in April's strong market performance and batted off news of Chrysler's bankruptcy announcement and deepening concerns about the swine flu outbreak.

  • UK Has Passed a De-Stimulus: Tax Lawyer Friday, 1 May 2009 | 5:23 AM ET

    The UK government's decision to tax people earning more than £150,000 ($225,000) a year on 50 percent of their earnings is a de-facto stagnation package, Charlie Elphicke, tax partner at law firm Hunton and Williams, told CNBC Friday.

  • Market Tips: 'Pork Bellies, Coleman!' Friday, 1 May 2009 | 4:51 AM ET

    "Pork bellies! I have a hunch something exciting is going to happen in the pork belly market this morning." Dan Aykroyd said just that in "Trading Places," the finest movie ever based on the commodities markets.

  • South Korea's April Exports Add to Economy Hopes Friday, 1 May 2009 | 1:20 AM ET
    Korea, Korean Flag

    South Korean exports in April fell less than expected and export earnings per day rose for the third month in a row, the latest signs that the global economic slump that drove Korea to the edge of recession may be easing.

  • Stocks End Flat but Gain Over 7% in April Thursday, 30 Apr 2009 | 5:25 PM ET

    Stocks ended flat for the day as news of a Chrysler bankruptcy filing quashed the day's gains, but logged solid gains for the month of April.

  • NYSE Traders

    The old "sell in May and go away" adage may be only partially true this year: Investors may sell a bit but aren't likely to stray very far after they do.

  • Credit-Card Bill Advances, But 'Cramdown' Fails Thursday, 30 Apr 2009 | 3:42 PM ET

    A credit card reform bill is progressing in Congress, while a bill to let homeowners use bankruptcy court as a an alternative to foreclosure appears unlikely to become law, sources say.

  • Pros Say: Recession to End This Summer (Updated) Thursday, 30 Apr 2009 | 3:40 PM ET

    Investors saw some glimmers of hope in the economy as various data and Wednesday's FOMC statement helped boost stocks on Thursday. Some bullish experts even said there may be more better days to come. Read and listen to what experts had to say... (Updated)

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