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  • Small Business Sentiment Still Shaky Tuesday, 27 May 2008 | 8:35 AM ET

    The majority of small business owners think the U.S. economy is getting worse, though sentiment showed some improvement in May from its recent lows, according to a survey released on Tuesday.

  • Greenspan Says Recession Still Likely in US: FT Monday, 26 May 2008 | 8:47 PM ET
    On his last day as chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Alan Greenspan smiles as he presides over his final Federal Open Market Committee meeting at the the Fed's headquarters in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2006. He is speaking to Deborah J. Danker, at left, special assistant to the board, with Vice Chairman Roger W. Ferguson Jr., at right. Greenspan has held the post for more than 18 years and is widely viewed as the most successful chairman in the Fed's 92-year h

    Former Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan was quoted on Tuesday as saying the United States was still more likely than not to have a recession despite relative stabilization in the economy in recent weeks.

  • End of US Housing Slump Likely to Be Long, Painful Monday, 26 May 2008 | 4:41 AM ET

    "This is going to be another difficult spring," said Mark Zandi of  Moody's Economy.com. "I think we are at the beginning of the end of the housing downturn, but it is going to be a long and painful end."

  • Buffett: Banks Are to Blame For Subprime Debt Crisis Sunday, 25 May 2008 | 10:20 AM ET
    Warren Buffett

    Blame for the sub-prime crisis lies at the feet of banks who took too many risks in mortgage lending, Warren Buffett told a Madrid newspaper. Earlier, the billionaire investor said he expected a "long, deep" recession. 

  • JP Morgan Chase Launches Major Round of Layoffs Friday, 23 May 2008 | 3:04 AM ET

    Officials at JP Morgan Chase have launched a major round of layoffs in the firm's vaunted investment banking department, axing dozens of executives, CNBC has learned.

  • Paulson on Oil: Don't Blame Speculators Thursday, 22 May 2008 | 5:55 PM ET

    U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson told CNBC Thursday that rising oil prices are not driven by market speculation but instead reflect tight supplies and growing global demand.

  • Wall Street appears resigned to the idea that the Federal Reserve is done cutting interest rates, but a patchy economy could force policy-makers to keep their scissors handy.

  • Who's Hiring New College Grads? Find Out Here Thursday, 22 May 2008 | 12:24 PM ET

    The job market may be getting tough,  but these companies are hiring  more entry-level workers than a year ago.

  • High Food Prices Likely to Continue For a Decade Thursday, 22 May 2008 | 11:56 AM ET
    Vegetables

    High food prices will continue for at least a decade even if they drop from the levels that sparked street protests or riots in Africa, Asia and the Caribbean in recent months, government-backed international agencies say.

  • Fed's Kroszner: Mortgage Market to Recover Slowly Thursday, 22 May 2008 | 10:03 AM ET
    Randall S. Kroszner

    The US mortgage market will recover slowly from a wave of bad loans that threw financial markets into crisis and the lending system will need repairs, Federal Reserve Governor Randall Kroszner said Thursday.

  • Jobless Claims Fall, But Employment Outlook Still Dim Thursday, 22 May 2008 | 8:37 AM ET

    The number of U.S. workers filing initial claims for jobless benefits unexpectedly fell by 9,000 last week to its lowest level in a month, the government said Thursday, but remained at elevated levels to underscore a sluggish jobs market.

  • Abby Joseph Cohen Sees Interest Rates Rising Wednesday, 21 May 2008 | 5:13 PM ET

    Goldman Sachs Senior Investment Strategist Abby Joseph Cohen told CNBC Wednesday that she sees U.S. interest rates climbing, though not necessarily in the short term.

  • FOMC Minutes from Meeting of April 29-30 Wednesday, 21 May 2008 | 2:20 PM ET

    The following is the text of the minutes from the Federal Open Market Committee's meeting of April 29 to 30, issued on Wednesday.

  • Fed Sees Slower Growth But Signals Rate Pause Wednesday, 21 May 2008 | 2:04 PM ET

    The Fed cut its economic growth forecast and warned of higher inflation and unemployment but signaled more rate cuts are unlikely.  "If you had any doubt that the Fed is signaling a pause, that doubt is gone," said one economist.

  • Fed's Kohn: More Trouble From Housing, Inflation Tuesday, 20 May 2008 | 11:42 AM ET
    Donald L. Kohn

    US interest rates seem to be at the right level to help the sputtering economy without sparking inflation, but policy-makers need to be ready to adjust quickly in the face of a highly uncertain outlook, Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Donald Kohn said Tuesday.

  • What is Buffett Looking for in Europe? Tuesday, 20 May 2008 | 8:15 AM ET
    Warren Buffett

    The Oracle of Omaha is looking for European businesses with pre-tax profits of at least $75 million, but he says the bigger the better. The tour began in Frankfurt, continues in Lausanne, Switzerland Tuesday and rolls on to Madrid and Milan later in the week.

  • Economy Is Weak, But No Recession, Indicators Show Monday, 19 May 2008 | 10:06 AM ET

    The U.S. economy is weak but does not appear to be in a recession, according to a key forecasting gauge, the Conference Board reported.

  • Buffett: Fallout From Credit Crisis Not Over Yet Monday, 19 May 2008 | 9:30 AM ET
    Warren Buffett

    The fallout from the global credit crisis is not over yet, billionaire investor Warren Buffett said Monday.

  • UAW Urges Adoption of Axle Deal to Angry Workers Monday, 19 May 2008 | 4:06 AM ET

    United Auto Workers officials Sunday urged American Axle & Manufacturing Holdings workers to ratify a contract that would cut wages by almost 40 percent, shutter three plants and end a three-month-old strike with a subsidy of $218 million from General Motors.

  • Summer Job? Many Teens Are Saying No Thanks Friday, 16 May 2008 | 4:31 PM ET

    Many teens are seeking jobs that will help them get into college, so they're skipping the traditional summer employment that doesn't add anything to a resume.